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Feel free to name a few others...
Sure... Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, and Switzerland.... oh... and Iceland... in addition to New Zealand... Sorry... that's 7, not 6.

Runner up is Austria.

Special mention goes to Japan whom isn't on the list largely because I've never been there and so I can't say with certainty how it compares other than I've heard very very good things about the place.

Note how there is no Australia?

It's not that I don't like Australia... and... in fact, I'm Australian myself... But unless you're after some "single-young-man-work-in-the-sh*t-hole-outback-mines" get rich quick money, or are after a career move in banking, finance etc (in which case if that's what you want then you'd be much better going to London or New York), then I actually don't particularly see what is that spectacularly good that makes thousands of Kiwi's want to go live there.
 

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I understand this fascination with moving overseas, because we can often feel isolated where we are, and there is a yearning, especially when we are young, to experience a closer association with other cultures and countries. We feel like we are missing out if we don't explore living and working overseas.
Yep, and I think that part of the reason is that residents of most western countries, particularly in Europe, have high incomes, moderately large amounts of annual leave, and aren't generally fixated by spending stupid amounts of their income buying properties... as a result, it's not uncommon for Europeans to travel to another country many times per year for long weekends, holidays, visit family and so on. This notion is fuelled by the schengen-open-border policy and bucket loads of cheap flights. This is becoming a phenomenon in South-East Asia too as that geopolitical region of the world has a strongly growing middle-class.

It's less of an issue in the US, but that is largely because they have much less leave entitlements, and generally speaking, the US is as diverse in its own right for many Americans to consider it unnecessary to travel beyond the US... Even so, there is Mexico and Canada, and of course a dozen or so small countries in the Caribbean.

But here in NZ, we are too far from everywhere, and, its simply not cost effective given the tyranny of distance, to just pop across to to another country for a weekend... The idea of the "Big OE" is largely how Kiwi's offset those factors.

But yes, by and large, there are two sorts of Kiwis for the most part... Those that have travelled the world and know first hand how the rest of the world lives, and those that haven't travelled far (if at all) who think everywhere is better than NZ.
 

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Note how there is no Australia?

It's not that I don't like Australia... and... in fact, I'm Australian myself... But unless you're after some "single-young-man-work-in-the-sh*t-hole-outback-mines" get rich quick money, or are after a career move in banking, finance etc (in which case if that's what you want then you'd be much better going to London or New York), then I actually don't particularly see what is that spectacularly good that makes thousands of Kiwi's want to go live there.
Curious as to what you think makes NZ much better than Australia? In my mind, day to day quality of living is almost identical between the two countries. Both are wealthy English speaking Commonwealth countries with near-identical values. Main difference is that wages in several industries are higher in Australia, as is reflected by their GDP per capita relative to ours.

An example is nursing. A graduate nurse in NZ earns $52,460 per annum, rising to $54,034 in 2020 following industrial negotiations. This rises to $72,945 with 5 years' experience. A graduate nurse in Queensland earns $70,702 rising to $84,015 with 5 years' experience. This difference in income is not insignificant when it comes to building equity and feeling like you're in control of your financial future.
 

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Australia must have something going for it, as there is a huge number of New Zealanders living there. Any one have the latest figures, must be close to 3/4 of a million.
 

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Curious as to what you think makes NZ much better than Australia? In my mind, day to day quality of living is almost identical between the two countries. Both are wealthy English speaking Commonwealth countries with near-identical values. Main difference is that wages in several industries are higher in Australia, as is reflected by their GDP per capita relative to ours.

An example is nursing. A graduate nurse in NZ earns $52,460 per annum, rising to $54,034 in 2020 following industrial negotiations. This rises to $72,945 with 5 years' experience. A graduate nurse in Queensland earns $70,702 rising to $84,015 with 5 years' experience. This difference in income is not insignificant when it comes to building equity and feeling like you're in control of your financial future.
Your comparison is indeed quite right... At face value, typical incomes are more in Oz than in NZ...

Ultimately it's going to boil down to individual circumstances...

I had one employee who went to Oz, got a job doing basically identical work to what he was doing for me in Chch, and was indeed paid 30% more in Oz...

He came back and worked for me because for him to be able to afford to live in Sydney, despite that 30% more salary, he had to live about 2 hours travel each way...

Sydney = 4 hours travel per day (leave home 6am, Arrive back at home 7pm)
Christchurch = 20 mins travel per day (leave home 8:30am, Arrive home 6pm)

That extra time can be spent with children or other family, friends, going to the gym, a walk etc etc.

Yes, Sydney is a great place, but outside the Weekend, he had no life.

Not everyone will end up in situations like that of course, but it's a very good example of why sometimes chasing the money comes with sacrifices that simply aren't worth it.
 

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As at the 2016 Census 518,462 people in Australia were born in NZ
You're missing all the other non NZ born kiwis who moved, the latest figures I could find are from Dec 2015 where there were 634,560 kiwi citizens in Australia, I'm sure it's increased since then.
 

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Your comparison is indeed quite right... At face value, typical incomes are more in Oz than in NZ...

Ultimately it's going to boil down to individual circumstances...

I had one employee who went to Oz, got a job doing basically identical work to what he was doing for me in Chch, and was indeed paid 30% more in Oz...

He came back and worked for me because for him to be able to afford to live in Sydney, despite that 30% more salary, he had to live about 2 hours travel each way...

Sydney = 4 hours travel per day (leave home 6am, Arrive back at home 7pm)
Christchurch = 20 mins travel per day (leave home 8:30am, Arrive home 6pm)

That extra time can be spent with children or other family, friends, going to the gym, a walk etc etc.

Yes, Sydney is a great place, but outside the Weekend, he had no life.

Not everyone will end up in situations like that of course, but it's a very good example of why sometimes chasing the money comes with sacrifices that simply aren't worth it.
I agree with you that a 2 hour commute destroys any concept of quality of life, regardless of income. There is more to Australia, however, than Sydney. In some industries the job market in Sydney/Melbourne is fantastic, but in others it is very reasonable to find high paying work in Australia's middle cities, which remain affordable relative to the incomes they offer.
 

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Sydney = 4 hours travel per day (leave home 6am, Arrive back at home 7pm)
Christchurch = 20 mins travel per day (leave home 8:30am, Arrive home 6pm)

That extra time can be spent with children or other family, friends, going to the gym, a walk etc etc.

Yes, Sydney is a great place, but outside the Weekend, he had no life.

Not everyone will end up in situations like that of course, but it's a very good example of why sometimes chasing the money comes with sacrifices that simply aren't worth it.
Well transport is one of the few reasons why I've hesitated about moving to New Zealand - the reliance on needing a car to get around. There's limited public transport, expensive petrol and the traffic in the cities is no holiday either. In complete contrast to the other countries you mentioned.
 

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Well transport is one of the few reasons why I've hesitated about moving to New Zealand - the reliance on needing a car to get around. There's limited public transport, expensive petrol and the traffic in the cities is no holiday either. In complete contrast to the other countries you mentioned.
I think wellington holds its own in terms of public transport. Has always had a good suburban rail system and for a smaller urban area, on the whole seems to work well with regular services right out to the satellite suburbs of kapiti and the hutt valley. Auckland has plans under way to improve their urban rail also.
 

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I agree with you that a 2 hour commute destroys any concept of quality of life, regardless of income. There is more to Australia, however, than Sydney. In some industries the job market in Sydney/Melbourne is fantastic, but in others it is very reasonable to find high paying work in Australia's middle cities, which remain affordable relative to the incomes they offer.
Completely agree - I have family (Kiwis) in Sydney also who are both quite high income earners, live in a nice part of Sydney, and they work within 15min drive. For them, the Australian Dream gives them a lifestyle easily as good, and possibly better than what they might here considering their occupation/qualifications.

My main issue with Kiwi's fixation with the grass being greener in Oz is largely down to the fact that most of the greenery is focussed on the raw bottom line "average 30% higher income" and often, the reality is much much narrower, and in many respects, actually favours NZ.

For many places that Kiwis migrate to where they'll likely get work - namely Sydney, Melbourne, Gold Coast, then the cost of living in those places will erode that 30% somewhat... and in many cases, come with a lower lifestyle quality by long commutes (or living in outback mining towns miles from anywhere).. And then there is the perennial issue of the lack of access to social services should they fall on hard times and lose their job etc.

Don't get me wrong, Australia is a great country and has far more opportunities for career progression than NZ will ever have... just that I personally don't think the headline "30% more income" necessarily reflects an accurate measure of disparity between the countries.
 

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^^
Agree with you here, and I think the whole idea of Kiwis moving to Australia for solely financial gain is disappearing for the very reasons you've stated, coupled with a healthy NZ economy over the last half-decade.

I personally know many, many Kiwis who have moved to Oz over the past few years, none of whom I can think of moved there just for money, but for things like weather, beaches, to experience life in larger and more metropolitan cities, or just to have general change of scenery.
 

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Well transport is one of the few reasons why I've hesitated about moving to New Zealand - the reliance on needing a car to get around. There's limited public transport, expensive petrol and the traffic in the cities is no holiday either. In complete contrast to the other countries you mentioned.
I'd doubt that the majority of people considering migrating to NZ would choose not to move here just because of our lack of public transport... The US still sees very strong migrant growth despite Trump's policies and that countries woeful lack of public transport.

Most countries that we get strong migrant inflows from such as China, India etc, the idea of owning ones own car is something that such people aspire to which they often could only dream of doing in their own country... and other countries such as South Africa, owning a car is the norm since it's considered as too dangerous to use public transport over there.

Certainly European's considering migrating to NZ might consider otherwise, but getting around NZ in a private car is really not that much of a problem that many NZ'ers like to say it is... It's only really Auckland and Wellington that have traffic issues at a level where you need to factor it in to your plans... And Wellington for the most part (apart from the woes from their recent bus restructuring) does have an excellent public transport system which is as good as the average European city of similar size. Auckland is the main issue where traffic can be a problem and public transport is lacking, though this has improved drastically over the recent 10-15 years.

As for anywhere else in the country... traffic issues just don't exist to a level considered bad enough to require people to factor it in to their life. If you live in some of the more sparsely populated parts of Norway for example, then you're as likely to need a private car as you are in NZ.
 

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... and other countries such as South Africa, owning a car is the norm since it's considered as too dangerous to use public transport over there.....
This perception of unsafety is exactly the reason NZ has a yearly positive migration balance with SA of around 10.000
 

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This perception of unsafety is exactly the reason NZ has a yearly positive migration balance with SA of around 10.000
It's not a perception, its a reality.

In my experience, however, safety on public transport is not even an issue confronting South Africans who decide to emigrate to NZ, but the level of public transport available in Wellington, and to a lesser extent, Auckland, is unexpected, and on a par with many European cities, and better than anything on offer in Africa.

There are many considerations to take into account when emigrating, and salaries and public transport are but two of them, and not even top of the list.
 
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