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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thread naming

To help me out, to make the forum look tidier and for the foreseeable future (while I'm sorting the threads out) could all threads for new developments take this format rather than starting a thread with number of apartments in it or square footage, or hyphens or just a street. We all put into this forum so we all need to help each other out.

Name of development | Street | Area | Height | Floors | Status

Example:
Burlington House | Tariff Street | Piccadilly Basin | 34m | 11 fl | U/C

If not all of the information is available for the above then use initiative and name it as per another thread with a similar development.

Any questions give me a shout.

Cheers

AJD1984
 

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Is it time for a rebrand of Chinatown's name?

The area is pretty run down at present, and the notion of a 'China town' is an archaic one now. Chinese people live all over the city, there are Chinese restaurants all over the city, there are other such amenities dotted all over the place. Also, a lot of the restaurants in "China" town are Korean, Singaporean, Thai etc etc, not just Chinese.

So is it time to breathe some life, creativity and innovation into China Town by re branding it, and giving the area a new name? Similar to Northern Quarter, Spinningfields, St Johns etc and the successes they've had in area rebranding. I think it would be good to keep the arch as a nod to the area's past, and also because it's an interesting feature
 

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Needs investment. The curve on the graph showing inward Chinese investment (and visits from China) and the decline of Chinatown is bewildering. I'd like to have a Japantown somewhere in Manchester, but that seems improbable.
I also cringe when I hear the words 'Curry Mile' mentioned.
 

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Is it time for a rebrand of Chinatown's name?

The area is pretty run down at present, and the notion of a 'China town' is an archaic one now. Chinese people live all over the city, there are Chinese restaurants all over the city, there are other such amenities dotted all over the place. Also, a lot of the restaurants in "China" town are Korean, Singaporean, Thai etc etc, not just Chinese.

So is it time to breathe some life, creativity and innovation into China Town by re branding it, and giving the area a new name? Similar to Northern Quarter, Spinningfields, St Johns etc and the successes they've had in area rebranding. I think it would be good to keep the arch as a nod to the area's past, and also because it's an interesting feature
Rebranding China town is only going to be like putting a plaster over the problem and not actually fixing anything. China town needs investment and some good, reputable businesses and restaurants.
 

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All city’s have some less manicured areas. They often make brilliant parts of city’s with true character. China town has loads of character that I’m sure eventually will be capitalised on. It won’t be long before the arty types discover cheap rents in warehouse style accom that is loved and the whole character of the place will be change. I worry about when that eventual evolution happens what character of Chinatown will remain other than the arch.
 

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The rents in China Town aren't cheap - they're in line with everywhere else in the city centre, so I don't know how the "arty types" are going to gentrify the place. IMO China Town would be vastly improved by just building on the surface car park (where the junkies seem to hang).

You could build two new buildings, a̶n̶d̶ ̶r̶e̶s̶u̶r̶r̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶m̶i̶d̶d̶l̶e̶ ̶p̶a̶r̶t̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶S̶t̶ ̶J̶a̶m̶e̶s̶'̶ ̶S̶t̶r̶e̶e̶t̶,̶ and leave a small square where the pagoda/arch are, with less trees and with active frontages from the new buildings on all sides acting as a natural deterrent.

Something like (apologies for crap paint job):

 

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It is a case of to save it, let it die. Aside from a couple of restaurants and the odd supermarket there really is nothing else there of any substance. It’s no longer a destination, the novelties you can find in some of the supermarkets and shops can all be found elsewhere. Unless you want cheap Chinese food or buffet then most people opt to go to Tattu or Yang Sing as their Chinese choice, Asian cuisine are now widely commonplace with Wagamama (Japanese I know) and Yo! all mainstream. The British born Chinese (BBC) are now third or fourth generation and the traditional ties to Chinatown somewhat diluted except for special occasions ie New Year. Clearly the businesses are reluctant to invest in refurbishments and renovations of premises as many of them look exactly the same as they didin the 80s/90s. The invasion of the drug addicts will add to the the already negative connotations people have of the area which will only get a lot worse before it starts to get better.

The massive wealthy mainland China student population are more inclined to eat M&S food or visit San Carlo than go to Chinatown as they see it as a caricature of Chinese culture, like the English going to eat at an Irish Bar when in China. So really it’s out of place and quite old fashioned in its current state. Perhaps it could survive or would be in a different situation had it been located elsewhere, closer to the Northern Quarter or the other side of the Gay Village. It’s current state and location mean it’s fortunes will not really change as far as I can see.

The building stock would make fantastic office accommodation if the restaurants stayed at ground level and got their act together and worked as a community. It’s going to be an interesting evolution to watch over the next few years.
 

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London China Town does be buzzing with both locals and tourists. First because it's London, duh. Apart from that a major difference is London's China Town is bigger. Cleaner, safer (ish), pedestrianised. Much more of a wider choice. A more themed area with atmosphere really pulling the tourists in.


Manchester Chinatown is down in the dumps. Sad, feels empty, no atmosphere, closed down and broken down restaurants. Little tourist have a reason to go there and that's only due to the appearance. Not mentioning the drug and homeless issues.
 

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The rents in China Town aren't cheap - they're in line with everywhere else in the city centre, so I don't know how the "arty types" are going to gentrify the place. IMO China Town would be vastly improved by just building on the surface car park (where the junkies seem to hang).

You could build two new buildings, a̶n̶d̶ ̶r̶e̶s̶u̶r̶r̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶m̶i̶d̶d̶l̶e̶ ̶p̶a̶r̶t̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶S̶t̶ ̶J̶a̶m̶e̶s̶'̶ ̶S̶t̶r̶e̶e̶t̶,̶ and leave a small square where the pagoda/arch are, with less trees and with active frontages from the new buildings on all sides acting as a natural deterrent.

Something like (apologies for crap paint job):

The car park needs to go, replaced by a Square not a building and creating a destination. A bit of pedestrianisation of the surrounding street wouldn't go amiss either.

I don't understand this compulsion to throw a building up everywhere homeless people gather. The homeless problem isn't going to get solved by a bricklayer but by housing and mental health policy
 

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I am not suggesting the buildings instead of a square, I just feel any square needs active frontages, so requires buildings where the blank walls are. These can be a lot smaller than suggested in my drawing.

I am against the idea of building on places where homeless people gather as a solution as you suggest. Especially, I think that building over Piccadilly Gardens would be a terrible idea and in fact think it needs less buildings (in particular the removal of 1PG) - it feels hemmed in by clutter - but I think that in the China Town situation restoring the old street fabric (whilst leaving room for a square of some kind) and therefore adding new spaces for different businesses, could go a long way to revitalising China Town.

Mainly I am interested on building on everywhere where surface car parks gather or preferably turning them into squares/parks.
 

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Needs investment. The curve on the graph showing inward Chinese investment (and visits from China) and the decline of Chinatown is bewildering. I'd like to have a Japantown somewhere in Manchester, but that seems improbable.
I also cringe when I hear the words 'Curry Mile' mentioned.
Maybe a Japan Town could be the bottom end of Cheetham Hill Rd..? A massive, big Japanese restaurant has opened opposite the M&S at Manchester Fort..Even looks Japanese from the outside!
 

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Needs investment. The curve on the graph showing inward Chinese investment (and visits from China) and the decline of Chinatown is bewildering. I'd like to have a Japantown somewhere in Manchester, but that seems improbable.
I also cringe when I hear the words 'Curry Mile' mentioned.
The "Curry Mile" died a good few years ago. It's more the "Shisha Mile" or "Middle East Mile" now.

There's less South Asian and more Middle Eastern businesses there now.
 

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The "Curry Mile" died a good few years ago. It's more the "Shisha Mile" or "Middle East Mile" now.

There's less South Asian and more Middle Eastern businesses there now.
went to go to the punjab recently after a few pints, couldn't find it and thought I was really drunk or something. turns out it's closed and been replaced already. absolutely gutted. was my fave for many years :(((

I need a replacement
 

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Been working all over the city these past few weeks which means I've had a lot of time to see it all in a way I haven't really had time to since I moved back here a year ago

Have to say, I absolutely love the direction this city is heading in. We're spreading out in all directions with some really exciting and dynamic architecture which is already captivating people. Everybody I speak to, many not from the North, can feel the buzz about the place - it really does feel like the centre of the universe at the moment (even more so than usual!) People from all over identify with the bees and love the way they've been decorated all over the city. I see tourists taking pictures of bollards with bees on, and posing for a selfie with the bee sculptures that've been installed over the city.

Ancoats and New Islington is just marvellous, I love the canal basin they've built at NE and the Italian-style square they've laid out at Ancoats.

The riverside developments all along the Irwell are exciting too, and all the tall buildings proposed either side of the river in the next few years will just look amazing as well - a canyon like nothing else in the UK. I also quite like how narrow our river is compared to other cities' rivers. It makes everything more 'cosy' and closed in compared to wider rivers that feel can quite windswept and exposed. With a bit of TLC, boundary treatment and a cohesive set of riverside promenades together with bars and restaurants all along the water, the Irwell all the way down to Pomona and the Quays could be something fantastic
 
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