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Even as the water's edge is being transformed in every borough, two photographers are revealing the hidden worlds that lurk along the city's rim.

Source : New York Times



Diane Cook and Len Jenshel
Lighthouse and George Washington Bridge, Manhattan A puddle meanders across the foreground like the river itself, and the tiny lighthouse, dwarfed by the bridge, becomes a symbol of all that technology renders obsolete. "There's a level of complexity to the picture that makes you look again," says Diane Cook, photographer, "and that's what we strive for."



Diane Cook and Len Jenshel
Wolf's Pond Park, Staten Island Only the watermelon, left to cool by picnickers, hints at the human activity behind the lens. "If we put a lot of people in the pictures, then it's going to become about those specific people," says Len Jenshel, photographer. "We want people to look at the pictures and imagine themselves there."



Diane Cook and Len Jenshel
Riverside Park South, Manhattan "We were intrigued by these new plantings popping out of the snow and the fencing that implies restoration, and then this still-unrestored float bridge in the distance," Ms. Cook says. "It's an image that talks about so many of the things that are going on along the waterfront."



Diane Cook and Len Jenshel
North Brother Isalnd, The Bronx "Before I took this photo," Mr. Jenshel says, "I thought the tool shapes were where the paint had faded, but then I wondered if they had been painted on." Either way, the presence of some ghostly hand is palpable.



Diane Cook and Len Jenshel
Harlem River Boat Club, Manhattan In search of Bette Midler's new boathouse, the photographers stumbled on this ramshackle private boat club, its members mostly retired police officers. "Their great fear," Mr. Jenshel says, "is they are going to get torn down."



Diane Cook and Len Jenshel
Astoria Pool, Queens The personal and the aesthetic guided Ms. Cook's vision here; she found the "marvelous Deco pool" more interesting without the Triborough Bridge above it. It was also the place her parents met; she took them back there for their 55th wedding anniversary.



Diane Cook and Len Jenshel
Red Hook, Brooklyn "When I photographed this sugar refinery," Ms. Cook says, "there was talk in the community of wanting to turn it into a cultural center, but now I've heard it's been purchased and there's talk of condos and offices."



Diane Cook and Len Jenshel
Bungalows, Rockaways, Queens Distrust of authority runs deep in many outlying waterfront communities. "It took 45 minutes of sweet-talking for us to get through the fence," Ms. Cook says, "and another hour to allow them to let us take pictures." In the distance, the A train nears the end of its journey.



Diane Cook and Len Jenshel
Tubby Hook Cafe, Dyckman Street Pier, Manhattan The literal and the intuitive meet in the couple's photographs of this place. "I saw these great parakeets in a bird cage," Mr. Jenshel says, "and the blimp is coming, and all of a sudden I had this flying association, but parakeets can't fly because they're caged. Then I also see the people fishing over there in the caged area."



Diane Cook and Len Jenshel
Midland Beach, Staten Island "There's just something lovely about fishermen being out on this pier that they're not supposed to be on and the moon rising and the tide coming in," says Ms. Cook, who waded in ankle deep to steal this moment of illicit romance.
 
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