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dRusenec :)
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm interested what is the situation in your country, cause this is a popular issue, especially in EU..

In BG we have a stupid govt dependant on MicroShit...with one notable exception - the HP blade cluster installed for the National Agency of Taxation. It was even in the top500 supercomputers list - http://www.top500.org/system/7882

Anyway, we don't have neither RedHat, nor Novell direct representation. We will anyways have the RedHat certification exams held in a Sofia exam center since 2007.

It's much better in the private sector though - many small and middle-sized companies already use Linux. Most hosting companies are LAMP-based. My employer (a mobile telco) relies more and more on Linux and Opensolaris. Large companies rely more and more on opensource software, not only on enterprise proprietary software.

I think Slovenia is the country where the OSS is most prevalent - I can give many examples for that. I know Romania copes better than us too. What about your country? I know GR, MK and CRO are heavily M$-dependant, unfortunately :(

Anyway, I'm proud there are linux kernel developers in my country - e.g the leader of the ntfs support project is a Bulgarian, another guy from Varna is among the largest contributors to the netfilter and lvs projects.

BTW just to boast myself...I write kernelspace code too. But I am not very proud of it, many people had kernel panics because of it :()
 

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ъхъ
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The problem of Bulgaria is yet again the politics. They don't have a clear picture of what the country needs. I've spoken with some regional leaders and NONE of them have ever heard the word open source. You just can't explain them why it's nice to even consider there's another option. Let's say that those guys knew only how to read their mail and use a browser. Imagine if you start talking about kernels, developers and so on.

Anyways, the biggest problem is the corrupted way of choosing the companies that made the informatisation of our ministries. Also, the cost of learning people use other systems and for the moment, it's better to leave the situation as it is. It's better to give the money for the optimisation of the public service than redoing the infrastructure, at no matter what level.

Concerning the IT sector, it's clear Bulgaria needs to develop on another level the resources it has. Let's see if there'll be someone with brain that will help the companies develop or not. ;)
 

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http://www.slobodensoftver.org.mk/

This is the website of the non-gov. group Sloboden Softver Makedonija. They are bunch of open source aficionados promoting it's use in Macedonia. You can find other links on their website related to the open source movement in MK.

here's something that might be interesting to you bgrs (or any other techo utopist/freak or open-source fan). It's called RepRap and it's the first rapid prototyper that's gonna be open-source and + it's going to be self-replicating. Check out it's webpage: http://reprap.org/bin/view/Main/WebHome
or the wikipedia page:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RepRap
Amazing technology, hope it'll gather many followers and develop to full potential soon. :cheers:

Anyways, I was kind of hoping this thread would get many posts since I am really keen on seeing how far are EE nations in open-source software use.
Anything to say guys??
 

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dRusenec :)
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
^^ Hm, we got many opensource orgs here, the Opensource movements in BG's official pages should be these ones:

http://opensource-bulgaria.org/
http://fsa-bg.org/

We have our large linux community at:
http://linux-bg.org

There are some very well-known BG guys that are heavy contributers to the linux projects as well as some well-known security experts like Georgi Guninski (he seems to be more interested in finding M$ bugs now though :() Most famous BG linux kernel contributors are this guy:
http://www.ssi.bg/~ja/
who did a great job for the netfilter/iptables project and is credited in the "famous" LARTC document
Or like that guy, who is the NTFS support project's leader (Anton Altaparmakov):
http://www.kernel-traffic.org/kernel-traffic/quotes/Anton_Altaparmakov.html

Russians and Poles are leading in EE though, at least from that point of view...but we are *strong* too :)

We have some regional LUGs too (we have a LUG in my hometown too).

And we have local UGs of many linux software, e.g PHP, Apache, joomla, KDE, etc.

We have a solaris UG (mostly interested in opensolaris, a colleague of mine is involved there):
http://www.filibeto.org/sun/

We have an OpenBSD UG:
http://bgbug.berlios.de/

One of the core devs in the OBSD project is a Bulgarian who lives in Canada:
http://valchev.net/peter/

The FreeBSD movement (they also have a commercial entity):
http://bg-freebsd.org/
http://bulgaria-freebsd.com/

However, our Government is very dumb and corrupt. Unless there is some clear EU directive, not much will happen here.

But as I said, open source products are widely used in the private sector here and I'm very happy about it.

Anyway, I am not an OSS freak, the Stallman type - I work with both proprietary&OS software at work. But I think the FOSS model is the future - it's just that the business model is changing and some old companies are going to die if they do not follow the trends. I'm happy because really to some extent here in EE we are part of the new future :)

Screw the old monopolies like Microsoft and Cisco :) Especially Cisco, at least M$ produce their nice X-boxes :) We now have RedHat and Vyatta, and we are quickly growing and overtaking the market :pPP
 

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dRusenec :)
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
^^ I was in the Redmond camp a long time ago..I was developing Delphi apps. Anyway, linux adoption was trendy among geeks in the end of 90s here...the old IRC&dialup times..so I gave up. Now I'm glad about this - OSS is my profession.
 

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I have a question for Romania and Bulgaria: how has your government fought piracy and was it any successful? I'm not talking about software piracy only, but music and DVDs too.
Since you're the newest EU members, and the EU is very strict about piracy I'm sure you have some experience to share with us (who BTW are struggling with this problem).
 

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Albanian government+people are heavily dependent on Windows. Open source apps are used by some geeks only. Piracy is pretty bad, so when you go into a software store and have the choice of choosing between WinXP and Ubuntu at the same price point ($5), obviously the vast majority will go with XP.

As for open source websites the only one I know is www.alblinux.net.

You have to admit that Windows is way more user friendly than Linux. So I don't see an open source adoption happening any time soon.

Personally I use OpenOffice in my laptop among other smaller apps (like firefox). I tried Ubuntu for a day once and I did not like it at all (supposedly Ubuntu is the most user friendly version of Linux...)

But now I have a fully legal copy of Vista Business, and I will not even look again at a Linux OS for long time. :D
 

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dRusenec :)
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
^^ Gotsomekicks, that's how we, Bulgarians fight piracy :)


Anyway, we got some very weird laws concerning piracy. For example, for a couple of months this year, p2p filesharing was defacto illegal, the police raided the offices of the Bulgarian trackers, ordered the ISPs to filter traffic to the trackers, arrested some big uploaders. There were protests until this funny law was dismissed.

The laws about piracy are strict for companies with police raids, etc. For individuals though, piracy is widespread.
 
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