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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
saw this in the herald this morning, anyone got any pictures of the plan?

Orakei plan labelled a 'Shanghai surprise'
5:00AM Wednesday June 18, 2008
By Bernard Orsman
A $1 billion plan by developer Tony Gapes for the Orakei headland, including 1000 apartments and two 13-storey towers, was labelled a "Shanghai surprise" last night.

Auckland City councillor Aaron Bhatnagar made the comment at the Hobson community board, signalling to Mr Gapes that he had a political fight on his hands to develop prime coastal land five minutes from downtown Auckland.

Mr Bhatnagar, a Hobson ward councillor, has been a vocal opponent of previous plans by Mr Gapes' Redwood Group at Orakei.

"We have gone from East Germany by the sea to a Shanghai surprise," Mr Bhatnagar said.

Mr Gapes, Redwood development director Andrew Showler, and Richard Harris, a director of Jasmax architects who have worked up the new masterplan for Orakei, presented the latest proposal to the board.

The masterplan, developed in conjunction with Auckland City Council planners, would turn about 40 per cent of the coastal edge into public open space with esplanades, boardwalks and jetties.

But in exchange for donating esplanade land and making public improvements at a cost of $100 million to his Redwood Group, Mr Gapes wants permission for more intense development, which he says is needed to make the project commercially viable.

A key part of the plan involves building a community based around the Orakei railway station. This would include covering the train station with buildings and a plaza with shops, restaurants, cafes, health facilities, a gym, creche and commercial facilities.

There would be 1000 apartments and townhouses, including two 13 storey blocks - one with a rooftop restaurant - towering 59m above sea level.

Narrow and busy Orakei Rd would be widened, straightened and raised to allow for rail electrification.

The Orakei Residents' Society, set up to oppose previous plans by Mr Gapes for 42 apartments at 246 Orakei Rd and 146 apartments at 228 Orakei Rd, was flabbergasted when shown the plan on Monday.

President Warren Tuohey said it would be opposed every inch of the way.

Society member Linda Sheridan yesterday said Mr Gapes must be trying to scare people back to his earlier plans by coming up with a project five times the size of what planning commissioners rejected at 228 Orakei Rd.

The masterplan goes to the council's property enterprise board before being presented to the city development committee, where it will come under political scrutiny for the first time.

Mr Gapes said the committee had the power to reject the plan but that would be a vote for ad hoc development under the current mixed use zoning rules at Orakei.

Mr Gapes said if politicians, such as Mr Bhatnagar, rejected the proposed masterplan they would be giving up public access to the waterfront, 40 per cent public space, realigned transport and other benefits.

Mayor John Banks is staying tight-lipped about the latest plans for Orakei, saying he was interested to hear what Aucklanders had to say.

Mr Banks has criticised other developments by Mr Gapes and called his 228 Orakei Rd plan "frightening".
 

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I reckon this looks awesome. However judging by the above article we can probably kiss this one goodbye
 

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Just like Sister Ray said
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- towering 59m above sea level.
:lol:This is what constitutes "towering" in NZ? Comparing these little stumps to Shanghai is absurd.

Anyway, the plan for Orakei looked fantastic. But, everyone in this country is terrified of tall buildings. Therefore we might as well forget it was ever suggested. I will be very (pleasantly) surprised if this goes ahead :eek:hno:
 

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Yeah I think I quite like it too. But once again I doubt it'll go through, as most Aucklanders are stuck in small-town mentality.
 

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Intensive development, right by a rail station, only 1 stop to the CBD?

what's to complain about? Looks great, very sensible, wealthy people with views to protect will scupper it.
 

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******
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Typical Auckland...
Old baby boomers from retirement homes think Orakei Point is some amazing Auckland landform which displays the rich volcanic history...Ahem! NO!

The place is currently a DUMP and anything is better than what is there at the moment!
It'll be great to have a nice dense seaside development around the Railway Station.
I think the plans are fantastic but as usual they will be turned down!
 
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I love it, something that should be done at all train stations BUT the VILLAGE IDIOTS will have their usual whinge again (backed by NZ Herald) .... therefore I am not going to get my hopes up.

This development could set a precedent for others to follow .. it is the sort of thing that you will find in Australian cities and I am hoping that it isn't too "advanced" for Auckland. I am hoping that there are people with vision who will embrace this and send the nimby's packing.
 

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to fly
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What I find incredibly strange about the opposition to it is that this development would be mere metres away from one of the most expensive residential streets (on par with St. Stephen's Avenue I would say) in Auckland, let alone the country, Paratai Drive. Following this logic, getting an apartment in the area wouldn't exactly be the cheapest of tasks. The development looks nice, it utilises the area well, is modern and actually is a very pleasing 'connector' before the equally pleasing residences around the Orakei area and Eastern Bays. Currently, what do we have? A real estate agent, a tile warehouse, a pool centre, a garden centre, an emerging train station and a conference centre. Room for improvement, wouldn't you think?
 

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^^

I expect the entire development to be reduced to one dairy, selling more liquor than anything else, a slightly improved railway station, and maybe a warehouse or two. The ferry will never materialise..... if you can't get any decent frequency of ferries from Gulf Harbour down the East Coast bays (I wish) to the city, I doubt whether they will manage to get a ferry running into Orakei. Expect Orakei residents in their hordes, wooden crosses in hand exorcising the 'devil' of development. :)
 
G

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^^

I expect the entire development to be reduced to one dairy, selling more liquor than anything else, a slightly improved railway station, and maybe a warehouse or two. The ferry will never materialise..... if you can't get any decent frequency of ferries from Gulf Harbour down the East Coast bays (I wish) to the city, I doubt whether they will manage to get a ferry running into Orakei. Expect Orakei residents in their hordes, wooden crosses in hand exorcising the 'devil' of development. :)
:lol: :applause:
 

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I think this development would be a positive one. Hearing all these people oppose any development (including good ones) is starting to make me feel sick to the stomach, they are so pathetic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
hey, looking at the aerial view drawing, what is going to happen to the conference centre (it's call pinto i think)? i didn't think this was own by redwood group, well it's all leasehold land any way.

i actually live in the area, i am not one of those people that oppose to all new developments, i don't mind the development further down by the garden centre and the railway station, but don't think it will be that nice so close to the road, especially it is going to be on both side of the road, because it is actually quite nice driving home along orakei road and seeing lush green and not seeing many buildings on side of the road, it's like driving in the country side and sometimes you forget you are only 5 minutes from the CBD, it will be good to see an artist impression of the development as seen from the road, not as an aerial view, the aerial view always looks impressive, but unless we own a helicopter, we never going to see it from that angle.
 

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No I didn't get your email sorry tallboy. PM me if you like and I can send you my work email address.

The more I read about this proposal the more I like it. Yes it is something a little different, and perhaps it's only been proposed to freak out residents into accepting the original plans, but really the developers would be daft to want to create anything that isn't top quality (as it's a great site for luxury apartments). It is one railway stop from the city so council should limit the parking provisions to encourage people to use the train, make sure the greenery appearance from the road remains, and that the volcanic heritage of the site is preserved.... and sweet as.
 

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It got slapped down by council at an original consultation meeting. However, Auckland City had a MoU with Redwood with regards to a strategic plan for this area, so there's a lot of need to come to some compromise. I am guessing we'll hear more soon.
 

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Developer scales down Orakei plan
4:00AM Friday Oct 10, 2008
By Craig Borley



The latest proposal is smaller than the earlier, 13-storey scheme but it is still bigger and higher than the district plan allows. Photo / Supplied

The "Shanghai Surprise" has gone from Orakei Peninsula - replaced by a proposed six-storey development that will go out for public consultation over the coming weeks.

The Redwood Group that wants to build on the peninsula has scaled back its initial plans after fierce criticism over proposals for a 13-storey site tabled in June.

Orakei residents and some councillors baulked at the earlier high-rise option, with councillor and current city development committee chairman Aaron Bhatnagar calling it a "Shanghai Surprise".

Three new plans will now be presented to the public, with the developer's favoured model including a floor space of 88,000sq m - which is down from its initial drive for 100,000sq m.

The new second and third options provide progressively scaled back alternatives, of 74,500sq m and 69,000sq m accordingly.

The preferred proposal is still bigger and higher than the district plan's allowance of 79,000sq m floor space and a 15m, five-storey height limit.

That means a council plan change would be needed to allow it.

The proposal maintains the public amenities included in the originally planned development.

These include public access around the Point's foreshore - most of which is currently fenced off - two parks, boardwalks, a jetty, and the realignment and landscaping of Orakei Rd.

That realignment would involve the road being widened from its current two lanes to four.

A strip of cafes, restaurants and boutique shops is included - part of 10,000m of retail space included in the development. Another 10,000sq m of commercial space is included.

The project also retains the proposed covering of the train lines to form an enclosed station.

Objectors to the development have cited the peninsula's volcanic origin and the development's inability to go ahead under existing planning guidelines as its main faults.

Speaking at yesterday's city development committee meeting, representatives of the Orakei Residents Society said a development incorporating less than 30,000sq m of floor space was better suited to the site.

They said the needs of a few developers should not usurp the wishes of the greater Orakei population.

But councillors responded by saying the existing law's allowance of up to 79,000sq m of floor space made suggestions of a development less than that limit redundant. Public consultation will include an attachment on the proposed development being included in Hobson and Eastern Bays wards' editions of the council's City Scene newspaper.

Information will also be available on to the council's website.

Public feedback will be delivered back to the development committee in December, with a decision on which, if any, of the three proposals will be chosen as the master plan to be made early next year. Formal and widespread public consultation would then follow.

Redwood Group development director Andrew Showler said the new option was economically feasible and was the result of ongoing consultation with the council, the Auckland Regional Council and residents.

The development couldn't possibly please everybody, he said, but the present proposal was the best chance of keeping most people happy.
 

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All they have done is remove the two 13 storey towers! It would look so much better with a variation in the height; Auckland is in disarray honestly there is so many fuckwits in this town backed up by the anti development NZ Herald!

 
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