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I was reading an article on a speech recently given by Chairman HEC (Higher Education Commission) Dr. Ata-ur-Rehman, in which he stated that the ratio of spending on primary education as compared to higher education is 2:1 around the world, but in Pakistan the ratio is 7:1. Out of Rs. 210 billion budget for education, only 28 Billion is set aside for the HEC, whichis testament to the above mentioned fact.

So the Government is definately doing its job by allocating more funds for Primary Education. The HEC definately should be given more funding. The federal allocation for education is only 2.4% of the GDP! When will our rulers understand that empowering the peole through education will bear more fruit then spending the national wealth on other less important things.
They are paying a fair amount of attention to education nowadays. Considering that just 7 years ago our Higher education budget was 600 million and now it is 28 billion. More can be and should be done, but this is one sector that is the progressing quite good.

Unfortunately, what is happening today should have happened decades ago. But there is no use crying over spilled milk. Actually, being very closely related to this sector, I am happy at the progress rate. Pump in too much money overnight, and you will have suboptimal utilization and corruption. You can't recover from past mistakes overnight..you just have to learn your lessons and work for the future.

I am quite sure we will reach the universal spending rate of 4% of GDP very soon but educating a nation and improving quality of education is a long term process- one that requires decades. I am sure the 8 new foreign collaborated universities would go a long way in improving our standards.
 

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Pakistan Zindabad!
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They are paying a fair amount of attention to education nowadays. Considering that just 7 years ago our Higher education budget was 600 million and now it is 28 billion. More can be and should be done, but this is one sector that is the progressing quite good.

Unfortunately, what is happening today should have happened decades ago. But there is no use crying over spilled milk. Actually, being very closely related to this sector, I am happy at the progress rate. Pump in too much money overnight, and you will have suboptimal utilization and corruption. You can't recover from past mistakes overnight..you just have to learn your lessons and work for the future.

I am quite sure we will reach the universal spending rate of 4% of GDP very soon but educating a nation and improving quality of education is a long term process- one that requires decades. I am sure the 8 new foreign collaborated universities would go a long way in improving our standards.

Amen to that! :yes:
 

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Everythin bubble of water
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Grace Clark told the conference that only 2.9 percent of Pakistanis had access to higher education. No Pakistani university was included in the 500 top universities of the world. There was a notable shortage of PhDs at Pakistani universities. The libraries and laboratories were ill-equipped and it was her observation that Pakistani libraries kept their books locked up. Many of the departments at Pakistani universities were “basket cases.”
http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_17-4-2005_pg7_37
 

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Everythin bubble of water
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The same figure of 3% can also be found at the website of "Higher Education Commission, Pakistan"

At present only 2.9% of our students aged between 18 to 23 have access to higher education (as compared to 68% of the same age group in Korea). The present plan aims at doubling the enrolment over the five year period by increasing the capacity of existing higher education institutions and, where necessary, establishing new ones.
http://www.hec.gov.pk/new/main/msg_chairman.htm
 

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Pakistan to hold int'l education conference

ISLAMABAD, Aug.25 (Xinhua) -- A two-day international conference on education is scheduled to be held in southern Pakistan's Sindh province, the Associated Press of Pakistan (APP) reported on Saturday.

Under the theme "Role of Medium of Instruction and Examination Methods in Learning Process," the conference will open at a hotel in Hyderabad of Sindh province on Aug. 28, according to the report of APP.

The Faculty of Education University of Sindh Jamshoro will organize the conference which will be attended by a large number of scholars from universities, education boards, and colleges from Pakistan, the United States, Nigeria and other countries in the world.


http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2007-08/25/content_6603628.htm
 

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List of Universities in Pakistan

For links: http://www.studygurus.com/pakistan.htm

* Agha Khan University
* Air University
* Al-Khair University
* Allama Iqbal Open University
* American University of Hawaii, Punjab Campus
* Asia Pacific Institute of Information Technology Pakistan (APIIT PAK)
* Asian Management Institute
* Bahauddin Zakariya University
* Bahria University
* Balochistan University of Engineering & Technology, Khuzdar
* Balochistan University of Information Technology and Management Sciences
* Baqai Medical University, Karachi
* CECOS University of IT & Emerging Sciences
* City University of Science and Information Technology, Peshawar
* College of Business Management ( CBM )
* COMSATS Institute Of Information Technology
* COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore
* COSMIQ Institute of Technology
* Fatima Jinnah Women University, Rawalpindi
* Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Karachi
* Foundation University Islamabad
* Gandhara Institute of Medical Sciences
* Gandhara University
* Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering and Technology
* Gomal University, Dera Ismail Khan
* Government College University Lahore
* Greenwich University
* Griffith College Dublin Ireland, Karachi
* Hajvery University
* Hamdard University
* Indus Valley School of Arts and Architecture, Karachi
* IndusTec Institute of Computer Science
* Institute of Business & Technology
* Institute of Business Administration (IBA)
* Institute of Business and Management Sciences & Computer Sciences
* Institute of Management and Technology, Lahore
* Institute of Management Sciences, Lahore
* International Islamic University
* Iqra University - Karachi Clifton Campus
* Iqra University - Karachi Main Campus
* Iqra University - Main Website
* Islamia University, Bahawalpur
* Isra University
* Jinnah University for Women
* Karachi Institute Of Economics And Technology
* Karachi Institute of Information Technology
* KASB Institute of Information Technology, Karachi
* Lahore College for Women University, Lahore
* Lahore School of Economics, Lahore
* Lahore University of Management Sciences
* Liaquat University Of Medical & Health Sciences Jamshoro
* Mehran University of Engineering and Technology Jamshoro
* Mohi-ud-Din Islamic University, Azad Kashmir
* Muhammad Ali Jinnah University
* N.E.D. University of Engineering and Technology Karachi
* National College of Arts, Lahore
* National College of Business Administration and Economics, Lahore
* National Textile University, Faisalabad
* National University of Computer and Emerging Sciences
* National University of Modern Languages
* National University of Science and Technology
* Newports Institute of Communications and Economics, Karachi
* Northern University, Nowshera
* NWFP Agricultural University, Peshawar
* NWFP University of Engineering and Technology, Peshawar
* Pak-AIMS (American Institute of Management Sciences)
* Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences
* Pakistan Naval Academy, Karachi
* Pakistan Virtual University
* Planwel University
* Preston University, Pakistan Campus
* Punjab Institute of Computer Science
* Punjab University College of Information Tecnology
* Pyramid Education Center
* Qauid-e-Awam University of Engineering Sciences & Technology
* Quaid-i-Azam University
* Qurtuba University of Science and Information Technology
* Riphah International University
* Sarhad University of Science and Information Technology, Peshawar
* Scholars Group of Colleges
* Shah Abdul Latif University Khairpur
* Shaheed Zulifkar Ali Bhutto Institute of Science and Technology
* Sindh Agricultural University
* Sir Syed Institute Of Technology Islamabad
* Sir Syed University of Engineering and Technology
* Textile Institute of Pakistan
* University of Agriculture Faisalabad
* University of Arid Agriculture
* University of Azad Jammu and Kashmir , Muzaffarabad
* University of Baluchistan
* University of Central Punjab, Lahore
* University of Engineering and Technology Lahore
* University of Engineering and Technology Peshawar
* University of Engineering and Technology Taxila
* University of Faisalabad
* University of Hazara, Dhodial, Mansehra
* University of Health Sciences, Lahore
* University of Karachi
* University of Lahore
* University of Northwest
* University of Peshawar
* University of Sindh
* University of the Punjab
* University of Veterinary & Animal Science
* Zia-ud-Din Medical University
 

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Since so many local institutes claim to be accredited with foreign colleges, does someone knows or can list the names of universities or other educational institutions that are fully recognized by universities in Europe & north America.
 

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Pakistani physicians and the repatriation equation

* By 2004, AKU had produced 1,100 doctors, 900 of whom went to the US for further training

In Pakistan, students who are accepted into medical school are congratulated - only half-jokingly - on three counts: that they will become doctors, that they will become certified by the American Board of Medical Specialties, and that they will soon be living in the United States.

Pakistan has contributed approximately 10,000 international medical graduates (IMGs) to the United States, even though it faces a shortage of physicians. Take the case of Aga Khan University Medical College in Karachi. By 2004, it had produced 1,100 graduates, 900 of whom had gone on to graduate medical training in the United States - despite the fact that doing so costs up to $20,000 (a fortune for most Pakistanis) and means leaving the comforts of one’s home and culture.

The United States represents an overpowering lure: a rigorous system of graduate medical education, a merit-based structure of professional rewards, and a culture of academic nurturing. And, of course, material rewards. In Pakistan, an intern earns approximately $150 per month (the same salary as an unskilled, illiterate worker), whereas a US intern can afford to live independently - and expect a better quality of life after residency.

Information from Pakistani medical institutions indicates that only about 300 of the 10,000 US-trained Pakistani physicians have resettled back home. Why did this minority choose to return? Aga Khan’s experience is instructive: the majority of the medical school’s 40 or so alumni who have repatriated from the United States have joined its faculty.

Motives for returning include aging parents and family ties, a desire to raise children in a familiar culture, and an emotional need to be home. But for many Aga Khan returnees, the attributes of the university and its hospital were key: teaching, research, and clinical care are patterned after the US model, and salaries permit a comfortable lifestyle. Ultimately, attractive career prospects have to be the draw.

The challenge is local capacity to absorb highly trained physicians. US-trained physicians represent a small fraction of Pakistan’s 116,000 doctors, but they return with ambitions to set new standards for clinical practice, education, and research and to influence academic medicine, health policy, and public health. To do so, they must negotiate local circumstances for which they are unprepared: exhausting clinical demands, an impoverished population, an environment in which malnutrition is a significant cause of death, collapsed health care delivery systems, and patients who respond to an unjust society with mistrust. Inevitably, they also face questions from local professionals about the appropriateness of US training for practice in Pakistan.

Discussions with expatriate physicians indicate that many more wish to return but cannot find suitable jobs. Like many poor countries, Pakistan has both severe shortages of health care professionals and a high level of unemployment among physicians - a paradox caused by inadequate and inappropriate investment in local health care systems. Elite medical academies in developing countries are frequently derided as manufacturers of a product that, out of place in its environment, enters a workforce supply chain leading to the West. The answer, however, is not to lament the irrelevance of these institutions but to advocate for more - for they can attract back highly trained professionals who have the potential to assume leadership roles. Repatriated Aga Khan graduates have won grants from major international agencies, established nonprofit research organizations, joined hospitals serving refugee populations, and led disease-control programs. Such academic institutions can play pioneering roles if they reorient their priorities to match their countries’ needs - producing professionals with a strong public health ethic, establishing rigorous graduate programs in which trainees are paid good wages, and developing relationships with alumni that can help sustain rewarding careers in challenging environments.

Exhorting physicians to serve in environments to which their skills are ill-suited will not lure IMGs home. Barriers to immigration in individual countries are almost meaningless in a globalized world. For example, as immigration laws in Western countries are tightened, Pakistani physicians are seeking jobs in the Middle East. We believe that developed countries that import physicians to meet their own demands have a moral obligation to invest in improving health care systems in countries that train substantial segments of their workforce. Such investments provide employment opportunities for the diaspora of health care professionals, benefiting health in developing countries.

As a first step, the U.S. medical community can support IMGs who want to repatriate. U.S. academic medical centers could work with institutions in developing countries to develop training programs oriented toward global health, availing themselves of growing funding opportunities for such endeavors.

One approach is to offer motivated IMGs mentoring to equip them with skills needed in their home countries. The scheme could be formalized through international cross-appointments for mentor and mentee at each other’s institutions and a bilaterally recognized role for the mentor. Such initiatives are desperately needed; properly done, repatriation of IMGs can help diminish vast disparities in health care.

Saad Shafqat and Anita K.M. Zaidi in New England Journal of Medicine. 356(5):442-443, February 1, 2007.

Dr Shafqat is an associate professor of neurology, and Dr Zaidi an associate professor of pediatrics and microbiology, at Aga Khan University Medical College
 

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^^what's the point. These ppl bring foreign exchange to Pakistan, support them, since we cannot provide decent jobs to these remarkable doctors spread all over North America
 

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Ranking of districts by literacy rates and illiterates (By 10+ and 15+ Years Age Groups)

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Pakistan Zindabad!
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Hmmm... Somebody here once told us that the literacy rate in Wah Cantt. was the highest in Pakistan because the military ordnance factories and research facilities are based in Wah Cantt and it also has the highest number of scientists and engineers than in any other city of Pakistan?
 

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Hmmm... Somebody here once told us that the literacy rate in Wah Cantt. was the highest in Pakistan because the military ordnance factories and research facilities are based in Wah Cantt and it also has the highest number of scientists and engineers than in any other city of Pakistan?
I think it is true and Wah has 100% literacy rate. There are many other small towns/villages where literacy rate is above 95%. That list is district-wise and Wah is a in Rawalpindi district.
 

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Literacy rate in Wah Cantt is 100%. It is the highest rate of literacy in any region of Asia. There are near about 115 educational institutes with near about 50000 students.

Source: http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/world/pakistan/wah.htm


From Wikipedia:

This small city (having area not more than 35 km) has two chartered Universities, one Medical College, one Engineering College and lot of schools.
 

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Musharraf Ka Danda!
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Yes, that was me who was talking about Wah's literacy.
 

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Literacy rate in Wah Cantt is 100%. It is the highest rate of literacy in any region of Asia. There are near about 115 educational institutes with near about 50000 students.

Source: http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/world/pakistan/wah.htm


From Wikipedia:

This small city (having area not more than 35 km) has two chartered Universities, one Medical College, one Engineering College and lot of schools.
Pakistan is such a different country, we have the lowest literacy rates in the world & we have a region with highest rate of literacy in any region of Asia.
 
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