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Everythin bubble of water
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Discussion Starter · #1,141 · (Edited)
So someone made this sub-national HDI map from the data collected by the UN and Pakistan does pretty bad here. Only Punjab (0.559) & Gilgit-Baltistan (0.552) are in the medium human development (0.550+) category. KPK (0.547) & Sindh (0.545) just miss out. While Balochistan is firmly in low human development (0.462).



If I zoom in to the region surrounding Pakistan, we'll get a clearer picture:



Countries/regions with low human development areas include (from West to East):

Honduras
Nicaragua
Haiti
Guyana
Suriname
Sub-Saharan Africa (exclu South Africa, Namibia, Botswana & Gabon)
Yemen
Iraq
Afghanistan
Pakistan
Nepal
Bhutan
Bangladesh
Myanmar
Loas
Cambodia
The Phillipines

Source of data: https://hdi.globaldatalab.org/areadata/shdi/
 

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Everythin bubble of water
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Discussion Starter · #1,144 ·
Well, this is interesting:

Pakistan: DHS 2017-18 - Key Indicators Report (English)

Publication Date
August 2018

Total Fertility Rate: 3.6
Urban: 2.9 (3.2 in 2012-13)
Rural: 3.9 (4.2 in 2012-13)

Trends in Fertility:

1990-91: 5.4
2006-07: 4.1
2012-13: 3.8
2017-18: 3.6

Fertility rate by Region:

Islamabad ICT: 3.0
Punjab: 3.4
Sindh: 3.6
Azad Jammu & Kashmir (AJK): 3.7
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK): 4.0
Balochistan: 4.0
Gilgit Baltistan: 4.8
FATA (tribal areas): 4.8

Median age at first birth: 22.8 (up 0.6 from 2012-13)

Teenage pregnancy and motherhood: Percentage who have begun childbearing

Islamabad ICT: 5%
Urban Punajb: 5.4%
- Punjab: 6.2%
Rural Punjab: 7.2%
Urban Balochistan: 8%
- Pakistan: 8.1%
Urban Sindh: 8.7%
Urban KPK: 8.9%
- Gilgit Baltistan: 9%
- Sindh: 9.9%
- Azad Jammu and Kashmir: 10.9%

Rural Sindh: 11.2%
- Balochistan: 11.6%
Rural Balochistan: 12.8%
- FATA: 13.2%
- KPK: 14.8%

Rural KPK: 16%

Contraceptive Prevalence Rate (CPR)

Total: 34.2%
Urban: 42.5%
Rural: 29.4%

Urban Punjab: 45.9%
Islamabad ICT: 45.7%
Urban KPK: 42%
Urban Sindh: 39.3%
- Gilgit Baltistan: 39%
- Punjab: 38.3%

Urban AJK: 35.2%
Rural Punjab: 33.9%
- Sindh: 30.9%
- KPK: 30.9%

Rural KPK: 28.2%
- AJK: 27.6%
Rural AJK: 26.1%
Urban Balochistan: 25.3%
- FATA: 21.8%
Rural Sindh: 21.4%
- Balochistan: 19.8%
Rural Balochistan: 17.6%

Neonatal mortality: the probability of dying within the first month of life

42 per 1,000 (down from 55 in 2012/13)

Infant mortality: the probability of dying before the first birthday

62 per 1,000 (down from 74 in 2012/13)

Under-5 mortality: the probability of dying between birth and the fifth birthday

74 per 1,000 (down from 89 in 2012/13)

Percentage receiving antenatal care from a skilled provider

Total: 86.2%
Urban: 94.3%
Rural: 82.1%

Urban AJK: 97.2%
Urban Punjab: 96.1%
Urban Sindh: 94.5%
- Islamabad ICT: 93.6%
- Punjab: 92.3%

Urban KPK: 92.2%
Rural Punjab: 90.4%
- AJK: 89.6%
Rural AJK: 88.3%
- Sindh: 85.7%
- KPK: 80.1%
- Gilgit Baltistan: 79.6%

Rural Sindh: 77.9%
Rural KPK: 77.4%
Urban Balochistan: 76.8%
- FATA: 71%
- Balochistan: 55.5%

Rural Balochistan: 46.6%

More here: https://dhsprogram.com/pubs/pdf/PR109/PR109.pdf
https://dhsprogram.com/publications/publication-PR109-Preliminary-Reports-Key-Indicators-Reports.cfm
 

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Everythin bubble of water
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Discussion Starter · #1,146 ·
Human Development in Pakistan

Human Development Indices and Indicators
2018 Statistical Update

On 14 September 2018, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Human Development Report Office launched the 2018 Statistical Update for Human Development Indices and indicators. These indices measure progress in key dimensions including health, education, income and gender.



Human Development in Pakistan

Pakistan has experienced a marginal increase in the value of HDI from 0.560 last year to 0.562 in 2017. However, over the years Pakistan has indeed seen greater progress in its Human Development indicators, with the HDI values increasing from 0.404 in 1990 to 0.562 in 2017. Overall, there has been an improvement in Human Development in Pakistan, however, this progress is lower when compared to other countries in South Asia.

The gap between values of HDI for India and Pakistan has increased to 0.078, while the difference between the HDI values for Pakistan and Bangladesh has increased to 0.046, with both India and Bangladesh far exceeding Pakistan’s HDI value figures. The HDI value for the South Asian region stands at 0.638, which is 0.076 points above Pakistan’s HDI value of 0.562.

Bangladesh, which was below Pakistan in early 1990s, has overtaken Pakistan by 14 places and is now ranked at 136 compared to Pakistan’s ranking of 150 in the 189 countries. Similarly, India has moved 20 places ahead of Pakistan and has taken the 130th position in the Human Development Index country rankings. Nepal has also overtaken Pakistan, jumping to the 149th place. The key message here is that Pakistan has the slowest growth in human development amongst all South Asian countries except Afghanistan.


What is contributing to the slow progress of human development in Pakistan?

While Pakistan is currently passing through a difficult phase of economic sustainability, the fact remains that Pakistan is faring well on per capita income basis when compared to other countries in the region. With a per capita Gross National Income (GNI) of US$ 5,311, Pakistan is slightly behind India (17.87%) and ahead of all other countries in South Asia. However, this progress in GNI per capita is being pulled back by the Country’s social indicators. On the education dimension of HDI, the expected years of schooling are 8.6 years, which is quite low compared to 12.3 years for India, 12.2 years for Nepal and 11.4 years for Bangladesh. The country also fares low in terms of health indicators. Pakistan’s average life expectancy at birth was recorded to be 66.6 years in 2017 which is below other South Asian countries such as Nepal with 70.6 years, India with 68.8 years and Bangladesh with 72.8 years.

Pakistan has a Gender Inequality Index value of 0.541. It roughly loses 3.73% of the HDI value due to gender inequality. There are disparities across all three dimensions of human development. The expected years of schooling for women are 7.8 against 9.4 years for men. Similarly, women’s access to health facilities is lower compared to that of men. The labor force participation for women is 24.9% as compared to 82.7% for men. It is the lowest in the region after Afghanistan. Overall in terms of the Gender Inequality Index, Pakistan is only ahead of Afghanistan in South Asia. The higher gender inequality has huge economic and social implications for the country as women constitute around 49% of the total population.

Overall, while Pakistan has shown progress in human development like other countries. However, this progress is very slow and doesn’t commensurate with the size of its economy and per capita income. More significantly, Pakistan is falling behind its neighbours and comparable countries in South Asia.

http://www.pk.undp.org/content/pakistan/en/home/blog/2018/human-development-in-pakistan.html
 

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Everythin bubble of water
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Discussion Starter · #1,147 ·
Countries With Highest Life Expectancies: Spain and Japan Lead, India and Pakistan Fare Equally in 2040

Americans Lose in 2040 Global Life Expectancy Rankings




In 2016, the U.S. ranked 43rd among 195 nations with an average lifespan of 78.7 years.

By 2040, Americans are forecast to only live 1.1 more years to 79.8, while dropping 21 spots in the global ranking of 195 countries to 64th, as other nations make faster gains, according to recently released data from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

The drop in the U.S. is the most for high-income countries. Indeed, life expectancy in the U.S. is expected to be only slightly better than that of Bangladesh, a country with considerably lower income. Yet, Bangladesh will have made a significant stride of having 6.7 more years in average life span by 2040.

The study data also showed that China will do better than the US by surpassing the 80-year mark by 2040. People in Russia, Kazakhstan and other central Asian countries may have life expectancies between ages of 75 and 80.

Indians and Pakistanis fare equally, according to the study. Life expectancies in both countries were just below 75 in 2040.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...ectancy-rankings-map?utm_content=neweconforum

https://www.latestly.com/lifestyle/...-pakistan-to-fare-equally-in-2040-444607.html

Life Expectancy in 2040 (selected countries):

Spain: 85.8
Japan: 85.7
Singapore: 85.4
Switzerland: 85.2

France: 84.3
Australia: 84.1
New Zealand: 83.8
S. Korea: 83.5
UK: 83.3
Turkey: 83.1
Canada: 83.1
China: 81.9
Cuba: 81
USA: 79.8
Bangladesh: 79.3

Lithuania: 78.9
Jamaica: 75.6
Russia: 75.6
Pakistan: 74.5
India: 74.5

Philippines: 74.2
Kenya: 73.9
Ghana: 72.3
South Africa: 69.3
Eritrea: 68.6
Sierra Leone: 66.9
Afghanistan: 65.2

Somalia: 63.6
Zimbabwe: 61.3
Lesotho: 57.3

In South Asia

2040


Maldives: 80.6 (range: 82.9-77.7)
Sri Lanka: 80.1 (82.6-77.1)
Bangladesh: 79.3 (81.9-75.2)
Bhutan: 78.6 (80.8-75.1)
Nepal: 76.8 (79.9-72.6)
Pakistan: 74.5 (78.1-70)
India: 74.5 (76.6-69.5)
Afghanistan: 65.2 (71.8-59.8)

Current

Maldives: 78.9
Sri Lanka: 77.1
Bhutan: 73.8
Bangladesh: 72.6
Nepal: 70.9
India: 68.6
Pakistan: 67.6
Afghanistan: 57.9

Projected increase

Afghanistan: +7.3
Pakistan: +6.9
Bangladesh: +6.7
Nepal: +5.9
India: +5.9
Bhutan: +4.8
Sri Lanka: +3
Maldives: +1.7
 

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Everythin bubble of water
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Discussion Starter · #1,148 ·
Measuring human capital: a systematic analysis of 195 countries and territories, 1990–2016

Summary

Background


Human capital is recognised as the level of education and health in a population and is considered an important determinant of economic growth. The World Bank has called for measurement and annual reporting of human capital to track and motivate investments in health and education and enhance productivity. We aim to provide a new comprehensive measure of human capital across countries globally.

Methods

We generated a period measure of expected human capital, defined for each birth cohort as the expected years lived from age 20 to 64 years and adjusted for educational attainment, learning or education quality, and functional health status using rates specific to each time period, age, and sex for 195 countries from 1990 to 2016. We estimated educational attainment using 2522 censuses and household surveys; we based learning estimates on 1894 tests among school-aged children; and we based functional health status on the prevalence of seven health conditions, which were taken from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2016 (GBD 2016). Mortality rates specific to location, age, and sex were also taken from GBD 2016.

Findings

In 2016, Finland had the highest level of expected human capital of 28·4 health, education, and learning adjusted expected years lived between age 20 and 64 years (95% uncertainty interval 27·5–29·2); Niger had the lowest expected human capital of less than 1·6 years (0·98–2·6). In 2016, 44 countries had already achieved more than 20 years of expected human capital; 68 countries had expected human capital of less than 10 years. Of 195 countries, the ten most populous countries in 2016 for expected human capital were ranked: China at 44, India at 158, USA at 27, Indonesia at 131, Brazil at 71, Pakistan at 164, Nigeria at 171, Bangladesh at 161, Russia at 49, and Mexico at 104.

Assessment of change in expected human capital from 1990 to 2016 shows marked variation from less than 2 years of progress in 18 countries to more than 5 years of progress in 35 countries. Larger improvements in expected human capital appear to be associated with faster economic growth. The top quartile of countries in terms of absolute change in human capital from 1990 to 2016 had a median annualised growth in gross domestic product of 2·60% (IQR 1·85–3·69) compared with 1·45% (0·18–2·19) for countries in the bottom quartile.

Interpretation

Countries vary widely in the rate of human capital formation. Monitoring the production of human capital can facilitate a mechanism to hold governments and donors accountable for investments in health and education.

2016

Expected Human Capital


Sri Lanka: 13
Maldives: 12
Bhutan: 9
Nepal: 7
India: 7
Bangladesh: 6
Pakistan: 6
Afghanistan: 4

Expected years lived between age 20 and 64 years (0-45 years)

Maldives: 43
Sri Lanka: 42
Bhutan: 41
Bangladesh: 41
Nepal: 40
India: 39
Pakistan: 39
Afghanistan: 34

Functional health status (0-100)

Sri Lanka: 59
Maldives: 58
Bhutan: 54
Bangladesh: 48
Nepal: 47
Pakistan: 45
Afghanistan: 45
India: 43

Educational attainment (0-18 years)

Sri Lanka: 13
Maldives: 11
Bhutan: 11
India: 10
Nepal: 9
Pakistan: 9
Bangladesh: 8
Afghanistan: 7

Learning (0-100)

Sri Lanka: 75
Maldives: 74
Bhutan: 70
Nepal: 69
Bangladesh: 69
Pakistan: 68
India: 66
Afghanistan: 64

Very interesting report. Full report: https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S0140-6736(18)31941-X
 

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Paiwasta Reh Shajr say..
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Pakistan population growth & other statistics

^^ good for Bangladesh at 3.8%, pop growth at about 2. We can learn lot from that muslim majority country.

https://www.citypopulation.de/Pakistan.html

To start this is an amazing updated link from Germany, a wealth of info.

Just click on a city, province and get detailed data, without which most decisions for progress can not be made.
 
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Paiwasta Reh Shajr say..
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So someone made this sub-national HDI map from the data collected by the UN and Pakistan does pretty bad here. Only Punjab (0.559) & Gilgit-Baltistan (0.552) are in the medium human development (0.550+) category. KPK (0.547) & Sindh (0.545) just miss out. While Balochistan is firmly in low human development (0.462).
Maybe technically, but they are shown in red on map. With the population explosion, esp. in KPK, Balochistan and even in rural Sindh - its no surprise.
 

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Paiwasta Reh Shajr say..
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Look at how high fertility rate is in Pakistan compared to the rest!! :eek:hno:

would love to see Pakistan at 2% within 5-10 yrs, else the country would be in serious trouble. j&k, west Punjab can do it, why not Pakistan. BTW kpk is definitely not at 2.

India's highest birthrate is lower than Pakistan's lowest :(
 

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Everythin bubble of water
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Discussion Starter · #1,153 ·
Maybe technically, but they are shown in red on map. With the population explosion, esp. in KPK, Balochistan and even in rural Sindh - its no surprise.
Yes, that's why I said "they just miss out". As they are very close to reaching medium human development. KPK & Sindh should get there within a year or two.

^^ good for Bangladesh at 3.8%, pop growth at about 2. We can learn lot from that muslim majority country.

https://www.citypopulation.de/Pakistan.html

To start this is an amazing updated link from Germany, a wealth of info.

Just click on a city, province and get detailed data, without which most decisions for progress can not be made.
would love to see Pakistan at 2% within 5-10 yrs, else the country would be in serious trouble. j&k, west Punjab can do it, why not Pakistan. BTW kpk is definitely not at 2.
East Punjab you mean? Since West Punjab is in Pakistan.

Pakistan's situation is embarrassing compared to India & Bangladesh. Those countries, especially Bangladesh, have focused a lot more on social & human development than Pakistan has. And KPK is not at 2, it's as 3.9, 2 just refers to it key.

India's highest birthrate is lower than Pakistan's lowest :(
Not quite and these are fertility rates, which are different from birth rates.

India's highest is Bihar at 3.4, while Pakistan's lowest is Islamabad at 3. Although Bangladesh's highest is Sylhet at 2.73, which is lower than Pakistan's lowest!

Another problem is that Pakistan's provinces are HUGE! So they hide glaring disparities between different parts of the provinces. Unlike India, Pakistan hasn't created smaller provinces/states by dividing bigger ones.
 

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Humanity at work : Lahore’s ‘Rizq Bachao’ movement comes to capital



ISLAMABAD: Even as the government has set up its own shelter homes in the twin cities of Islamabad and Rawalpindi to provide a roof to and food to the homeless and destitute, one social organisation which has gained a reputation for collecting surplus food from restaurants and wedding halls has opened its own centre in the federal capital where the destitute can eat good meals at lower prices.

‘Rizq Bachao’, is a mobile application-based service started by three students from the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS) including Huzaifa Ahmed, Musa Amir and Qasim Javed, with the aim of redistributing leftover and surplus food from restaurants and wedding halls to address hunger and malnutrition.

The service was launched in Lahore in 2015 and received praise and even corporate support. It has finally made its way to the federal capital, opening up a physical outlet near the Bari Imam Darbar shrine in Muslim Colony.

https://tribune.com.pk/story/1892468/1-humanity-work-lahores-rizq-bachao-movement-comes-capital/
 

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Ban on entry of maids, servants in elite clubs lifted



ISLAMABAD: Prime Minister Imran Khan on Wednesday ordered to remove a ban on entry of maids and servants in elite clubs and the practice would start from the Islamabad Club – an exclusive, semi-government club located in the heart of the capital.

Minister of State for Interior Shehryar Afridi made the announcement on Twitter.

https://tribune.com.pk/story/1900103/1-ban-entry-maids-servants-elite-clubs-lifted/
 

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Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi has deposited gifts worth millions of rupees received from Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman in the Toshakhana, Foreign Office sources told DawnNewsTV on Wednesday.

FO documents dated January 9 and 10 state that the gifts were given to the foreign minister during Prime Minster Imran Khan's visit on Sept 19, 2018.

According to the documents obtained by DawnNewsTV, Qureshi had received a Rolex watch, a gold pen embedded with gems, a pair of gold cuff links, a gold-chain rosary (tasbeeh) inlaid with precious gems, and a gold ring.

The total value of the gifts, assessed by an approved appraiser, amounts to Rs6.35 million.

A breakdown of the estimated value of the gifts is as follows:

Rolex watch: Rs4.85m
Gold pen with gems: Rs950,000
Gold cuff links: Rs135,000
Rosary: Rs205,000
Gold ring: Rs210,000

"The foreign minister has desired that the Toshakhana may retain [the gifts] and the sale proceeds may be deposited in the government treasury, as per prescribed procedure," an FO document states.

Related Slideshow: News in Pictures (Provided by Photo Services)

Full Screen
1/113 SLIDES © Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images
A journalist reads a local edition of the International New York Times in Islamabad, Pakistan, on Feb. 12, 2019, which shows a single-column blank space on the front page. An opinion piece in the newspaper criticizing Pakistan's army was censored by its local publisher, replaced by a blank space, in a country where it can be dangerous to reprimand the military.
Gifts are routinely exchanged between heads of states or officers holding constitutional positions on the eve of a state visit. According to Toshakhana rules, these gifts remain the property of the state unless sold at an open auction. If the original recipient wants to retain the present, they have to pay a fee determined by the Cabinet Division.

According to a news report from 2010, the then President Asif Ali Zardari is alleged to have set a record within a year of assuming office by taking one-third of all expensive gifts presented to all former presidents and prime ministers. Of the gifts of the value of Rs160 million, Zardari reportedly took away items of Rs62 million value during the first year of his presidency.

https://www.msn.com/en-xl/asia/asia...ifts-in-govt-toshakhana/ar-BBTwtGB?li=BBJGzsi
 

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10 Years :)
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Engro holds Water Day drive



Engro has reaffirmed its commitment to support the sustainable Development Goal 6 which is crystal clear on conserving the water so that the same can be provided to all by 2030. On the World Water Day 2019, Engro conducted a graceful campaign at the plant site advocating the Sustainable Development Goal # 6 which helped create awareness among the employees, stakeholder’s and guests to make sure that we take adequate steps at all levels and at all places. Speaking on the occasion, Plant Manager Zarkhez, Wajid Hussain Junejo, unveiled the strategy and plans to support the SDG6 to ensure availability of water for all by 2030.
 
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