SkyscraperCity Forum banner
1161 - 1177 of 1177 Posts

·
10 Years :)
Joined
·
23,746 Posts
Experts discuss ways to avert workplace depression

FAST-National University on Saturday organised an awareness seminar to address the grave concerns of growing psychiatric and stress problems in the society.

The seminar “Work Place Depression” was organised by students of the NU-FAST in collaboration with support of ethics and sustainability focusing creation of a buddy support system to raise social taboos and issues.

The seminar was addressed by prominent health experts and social activists including Dr Rizwan Taj, Dr Ehsen Naveed Irfan, Dr Abdus Satar Danish, Tauseeq Haider, Nabiha Fida along with chairperson of the higher education Punjab MPA Asia Amjad and chairperson of CM Punjab Inspection Team MPA Momina Waheed.

https://nation.com.pk/31-Mar-2019/experts-discuss-ways-to-avert-workplace-depression
 

·
Everythin bubble of water
Joined
·
22,671 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1,162 ·
Good analysis by Demographer Chrissib in the international section.

Fertility rates:

Lahore: 2.70
Karachi: 2.90
Pakistan: 3.60

Fertility rates of all mega-urban regions in 1990 and now

Disclaimer: Please treat the population figures as estimates, not as precise numbers. ;)

Those metro areas of over 10 million people have always fascinated me, since they are at the top of the urban pecking order. As you can see, they are mostly not the most child friendly places however. This is even more true now than in 1990, when many megaurban regions were still above replacement level. Today, the only megaurban regions that are clearly above replacement level are all in Africa or Pakistan.

Apart from Paris, all of them are either at or below their countries' average. In 1990, Los Angeles also had an exceptionally high fertility rate. This is related to the passing of the IRCA in 1986, which legalized many illegal immigrants, who mainly lived in California. They subsequently brought their spouses, which produced a baby boomlet around 1990.

It is also interesting to compare Cairo and Delhi. Cairo today has only a slightly lower TFR than in 1990. Delhi on the other hand experienced a large decline. Due to faster urbanization in India, Delhi nevertheless outgrew Cairo.

 

·
Karachiite in Toronto
Joined
·
949 Posts
^^That was majorly due to Urban migration. Delhi replaced Mumbai as the economic hub of India and it goes without saying that given its significance as a capital it does provide better services and living standards. Its also historically and culturallly significant. Besides the air quality, Delhi is an attractive city and I'm sure any Indian would love to live there. Hell, I would love to live there Lol

Lahore and Karachi should be fine if we simply develop other major cities (like Multan, Bahwalpur, Faislabad, Peshawar, etc.). The fertility rate will subside as education and opportunities grow, proper leadership and vision for Karachi and Lahore could transform both into sustainable Megacities. Also, I remember reading somewhere that the Islamabad/Rawalpindi metro area actually saw a higher urban migration rate than Lahore and Karachi in recent years. Can't confirm if that is true but if it is then I'm glad that Karachi and Lahore aren't the only prospects for a better a life for us. We should make sure we have 10 cities with combined population of 100 million rather than 2 cities with 50 million each (a milestone that Delhi and Mumbai will see soon).
 

·
Everythin bubble of water
Joined
·
22,671 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1,165 ·
Pakistan has a domestic abuse problem – but there’s a way to turn the outrage into action

After a TV host in Pakistan made light of the issue days after the wife of Pakistani actor Mohsin Abbas Haider accused him of violence, it’s clear a cultural shift is needed to de-normalise this behaviour


Local network GNN joked about domestic violence during a skit on ‘Joke Dar Joke’ this week ( YouTube/GNN )

Several years ago, at my uncle’s funeral, a distant relative next to me, whispered: “Good riddance. His poor wife is finally free.” Struck by newly palpable grief, her words choked me. How could someone be callous enough to curse the dead even before they were buried? My uncle – as it turned out – was a chronic wife-beater and my aunt, a brave yet convention-bound woman.

More than a decade later, as #saynotodomesticviolence gains virality in Pakistan, I recalled those words. Should my aunt have confided in someone? Is there something we had missed? Would I offer newfound advice to my daughters? But first, what even comprises domestic violence? Is the “see what you made me do” alibi legitimate? And beyond the blame-game, how do we fix things? These questions are complex, unsettling, and Pakistani society has mostly shirked them.

Back then, the words at the funeral offered relief – the knowledge that for my aunt, the worst was finally over. Today, I realise that a trusted member of our extended family, intimidating his partner, signalled a graver dilemma: that domestic violence is normalised and the price for whistle-blowing, often too rancorous for victims to speak up.

As I sifted through my university years and entered the job market, stories from workmates, house-help and one time even a stranger on a flight, surfaced, signalling how domestic violence permeates society in a privileged, agnostic fashion in Pakistan, cutting across race, class and religion. The elderly lady who cooks in my mother’s home and the fashion celebrity earning a six-figure salary are both susceptible to abuse. Accounts ranged from evident coercion to invisible bruises, both equally harrowing.


In 2018, a United Nations report cut to the bottom-line: The most dangerous place for a woman is her home. According to the World Bank, almost one in three married Pakistani women report facing physical violence. So every time a victim is shamed for speaking up, or a court refuses to convict a perpetrator, or a TV show jokes about domestic violence, we are lowering the stakes and emboldening home-grown terrorism, literally.

Commonly understood reasons for domestic violence often fuel confusion: a stroke of bad luck; wrong place, wrong time; substance abuse; financial stress; laudable possessiveness; a sex game gone wrong; a man hard-wired to hurt; and the false guarantee that with time it will vanish. These myths must be dismantled. Toxic masculinity, cultivated in male upbringing across South Asia, is largely responsible for normalising, even applauding an imbalance of power between the sexes. By privileging typically “masculine” traits of aggression, control and a natural killer instinct, domestic violence offers an ego-boost, buttressing the belief that it is, after all, a man’s world. When this gets augmented with society’s blind-eye, abuse blossoms; by remaining tongue-tied, we are all complicit.

However, before judging victims for suffering, we must examine the cost of speaking up. From the outside, silence appears synonymous with cowardice but this couldn’t be farther from the truth. Often, victims are rippled by prospects of shame, fatigued with fear, yet wondering when to take the plunge. They are planning a careful exit, calculating risks, devising strategies that don’t place their children in jeopardy – none of it is simple, especially not in Pakistan – where even affluent women are labelled troublemakers for casting the die against men.


A year ago, an ex-colleague broke down mid-conversation at our dining-table – her husband would throw furniture at her in front of their six-year-old son and had recently begun choking her during role-play. Her cry was a water-shed; it stoked within me, the deepest revulsion, but I disallowed the fury to curdle into bitterness. It was an invitation to reflect on how to make the leap from outrage to action.

I realise that Pakistan needs its own revolution to stir things up but how might such a movement be ignited? The answer can be found via a two-pronged approach.

First, domestic violence must occupy a higher seat on every agenda: global, national, political and personal. Words come cheap so instead of what we’re used to, from our partners to the president, practical, life-saving solutions must emerge – policies, helplines, accountability bureaus, rapid court case resolutions, therapy units, funding for shelters. Only then can the benefits of unsilencing outweigh the costs. But foremost, what must accompany curative measures is conversation – a cultural shift that de-normalises domestic violence. So that mothers stop admiring sons for abusing wives because they suffered similarly or because “she must have asked for it”. So that we stop relying on post market failure fixes but instead, offer proactive support, which makes perpetrators rethink violent acts before they occur.

When I look back, in an ideal world, my advice to my aunt and colleague would’ve been: “Don’t walk, run”. Nothing about our world, though, is ideal. So, I’ve made their stories come alive to show that domestic violence is non-negotiable, that nothing about abuse is funny and that all of us are responsible to pick up the pieces. Only with collaborative will can we hope for bells to chime and ring in change, for a world where no one has to wait for a partner’s death to set themselves free.

https://www.independent.co.uk/voice...buse-fatima-sohail-gnn-joke-dar-a9026791.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,040 Posts
ISLAMABAD: At the end of two years of the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) government, 18 million more people may slip into abject poverty due to low economic growth and double-digit food inflation, claimed Dr Hafiz A Pasha, the country’s renowned economist.

The national poverty ratio, which was 31.3% in June 2018, would sharply jump to over 40% by June 2020, said Pasha in an article that first appeared in Business Recorder.

In absolute terms, people living in poverty will increase from 69 million in June 2018 to 87 million by June 2020, indicating 26% increase in poverty or an addition of 18 million people in first two years of the PTI government.

As per Pasha’s claim, eight million people have already been added to the ranks of the poor by the end of the first year of the PTI government. He has projected that 10 million more people will slip below the poverty line by the end of the current fiscal year.


https://tribune.com.pk/story/2115274/2-millions-fall-poverty-line/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,040 Posts
https://www.asiatimes.com/2019/12/opinion/imran-khan-a-victim-of-his-own-illusions/


If Miguel de Cervantes were alive in the modern age he would have seen his fictional character Don Quixote come alive in the form of Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan, who like the noble of La Mancha only believes in delivering emotional and unrealistic speeches without doing anything practical on the ground.

@Imad Zafar for ASIA TIMES
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,040 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,652 Posts
Who says inflation has risen in Pakistan, as the country was ranked the least expensive country in the world to live in, revealed a report.





As per the CEOWorld Magazine latest report, Pakistan was ranked the most affordable country on the globe out of 132 countries. Even war-torn countries such as Afghanistan and Syria were placed above Pakistan on the index.

CEOWORLD based its assessment on a range of living costs, such as accommodation, clothing, taxi fares, utility, internet, the price of groceries, transport, and eating out. The rankings are based on five major metrics: cost of living, rent, groceries, eating out and purchasing power.

These data are then compiled into an index, using city of New York City (NYC) as a benchmark. New York was given an index score of 100.

So, Pakistan scored 21.98 for cost of living, 4.59 points on rent index, 19.08 points on groceries index, 16.78 points on eating out index and 30.57 points on purchasing power index.



Meanwhile, Switzerland was ranked the most expensive country on earth to live in. European countries were prominent on the most expensive list, of the top-twenty nations, nine were in Europe, five in Asia, one in North America, one in Africa, two in the Caribbean, and two in Oceania.

Norway ranks second in the list of the world's most expensive countries to live, followed by Iceland, Japan, Denmark, Bahamas, Luxembourg, Israel, Singapore, and South Korea.

BRecorder
 

·
Everythin bubble of water
Joined
·
22,671 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1,174 ·
According to the Global Data Lab by the Radboud University in the Netherlands, the same University that came up with the sub-national Human Development Index:

Life Expectancy of Subnational divisions



Source: https://globaldatalab.org/shdi/life...ation=0&nearest_real=0&colour_scales=national

https://vividmaps.com/life-expectan...Oa_nTgzfYCohaQZvwsoerwXQYYr7lwS6XlW3LZybNK-lA

According to them FATA & Islamabad (ICT) have a higher life expectancy than 70. FATA I find to be surprising. Maybe it's due to the lower levels of pollution there, as high levels of air pollution has affected life expectancy negatively in many Pakistani cities.

Life Expectancy by sub-region (2018):

1) FATA: 73 (peak 74.92 in 2012)
2) ICT: 70.77 (peak 72.61 in 2012)
3) KP: 68.79 (peak 69.06 in 2012 & 13)
4) Sindh: 67.22
- Pakistan: 67.11
5) Balochistan: 67.01 (peak 68.52 in 2007)
6) AJK: 66.33 (peak 66.83 in 2013)
7) Punjab: 66.29
8) GB: 65.01 (peak: 66.73 in 2012)
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
17,209 Posts
 
1161 - 1177 of 1177 Posts
Top