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Indus Priest King
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Space & Upper Atmosphere Research Commission خلائی و بالائی فضائی تحقیقاتی مأموری
SUPARCO is an executive and bureaucratic space agency of the Government of Pakistan, responsible for the nation's public and civil space programme and for aeronautics and aerospace research. Its mission statement and objective is to conduct peaceful research in space technology and promote the technology for socio-economic uplift of the country. Established in its modern form on 16 September 1961 by an executive order of President of Pakistan, it is headquartered in Karachi. Part of the Strategic Plans Division (SPD) of Pakistan Armed Forces, which is currently headquartered at the Chakalala Military District under the control of the PAF; the space programme recorded number of pioneering accomplishments in space flight during the initial years of its establishment.

Since its creation in 1961, the SUPARCO has achieved numerous milestones, including the first successful spaceflight of country's first weather expendable launch rocket, Rehbar-I. The country's first satellite, Badr-I, was built by the SUPARCO and launched by the People's Republic of China in 1990. However during the meantime, the space programme suffered many setbacks, difficulties, and problems that partly slowed the progress of the space programme The bureaucratic influence and politicization further lagged the space programme and many projects were cancelled by the superior authorities.

Over the years, SUPARCO expanded and has several well expanded installations all over the country as assets, and cooperates in peaceful use of space technology with the international community as a part of several bilateral and multilateral agreements. SUPARCO's science and research is mainly focused and concentrated on better understanding of the Solar system, Space weather, astrophysics (Big Bang Theory and Physical cosmology), astronomical observation, climatic studies, space and telemedicine, remote sensing and the Earth observation.
 

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Musharraf Ka Danda!
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10,199 Posts
saw it on CNBC Pakistan


Musharaf is putting all our money into the space program!
 

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Indus Priest King
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
CNBC Pakistan?

It started already? I thought they were going to start in May 2005?
 

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Musharraf Ka Danda!
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10,199 Posts
OMG CNTOWER!

they have a show setup already called Pakistan Today!
 

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Indus Priest King
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's on regular CNBC!
 

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Musharraf Ka Danda!
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but the shows name is CNBC Pakistan : Pakistan Today

and the same crew will be used by the way
 

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Indus Priest King
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What channel do you watch it on?
 

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Musharraf Ka Danda!
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10,199 Posts
they have 2 here

CNBC World-Pakistan This Week


CNBC International-Pakistan today

one is weekly one is on daily
 

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Musharraf Ka Danda!
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your right what the hell is this doing here? lol
 

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Everythin bubble of water
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20,646 Posts
The Space Industry

Pakistan and China to launch satellite next year

BEIJING: A multi-purpose small satellite developed by Pakistan, China, Thailand, Bangladesh, Mongolia, South Korea and Iran will be launched in 2006.

Sources said the satellite would be used for scientific experiments and environmental observations for the Asia-Pacific region. This was part of Pakistan’s effort to enhance cooperation with China and other regional countries in developing space technology, sources added.

According to sources, China, Pakistan and other countries had initiated multilateral cooperation in 1992 in space technology and its applications in the Asia-Pacific Region. A substantial breakthrough had been made in the past decade to set up the Asia-Pacific Space Cooperation Organisation (APSCO).

Representatives from 14 nations and a United Nations body had gathered in Beijing recently to discuss the proposed APSCO, which is being designed to promote the peaceful use of space and space applications in the Asia-Pacific region, sources said.

Representatives from Pakistan, Bangladesh, Brazil, China, the Republic of Korea (ROK), Iran, Malaysia, Mongolia, Peru, the Philippines, Russia, Thailand, Ukraine, Chile and the UN Economic and Social Council attended the second meeting of the Drafting Group on APSCO Convention. Brazil and some countries outside the Asia-Pacific Region attended the meeting as observers, and it had been agreed that the proposed APSCO would be based in Beijing.

Addressing the ceremony, Luan Enjie, director of the China National Space Administration, said the Chinese government would support the establishment of the organisation, make due contributions and facilitate various aspects in the early years of its founding. China had also decided to launch a communication satellite owned by a Hong Kong-based company into space during the first half of 2005. The satellite was expected to orbit for 13 years and would be responsible for transmitting radio and television signals for China, East Asia, Australia and Hawaii.
 

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Pakistan Zindabad!
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9,580 Posts
The Space Industry

ISLAMABAD, Aug 21: Pakistan plans to launch a self-controlled Remote Sensing Satellite System (RSSS) at a cost of Rs19.3 billion to ensure strategic and unconditional supply of satellite remote sensing data for any part of the globe over the year.

According to sources, the project will be executed by the Pakistan Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission (Suparco) over a period of six years. President Gen Pervez Musharraf has approved the project in principle.

The project will require another recurring expenditure of about Rs150 million per year and overall working expenses of about Rs1.15 billion.

The president, sources said, had directed Suparco to develop the capability to make and launch different types of satellites, specially, communications, remote sensing and weather satellites.

Pakistan’s space programme must contribute in the areas of mass education, information technology, communications, agriculture, mineral development, mapping and geographic information system, atmospheric sciences, environment and pollution monitoring and in various areas of national security, the president said.

On the completion of the project, high resolution satellite images will be available for national defence and security in any critical time. They will also enable universities and non-profit organisations to obtain satellite remote sensing data and carry out analysis for other application areas.

The project will help Pakistani engineers acquire comprehensive know-how and technology transfer. Thus, it will be a vital support for future in-house Pakistan remote sensing satellites of world standards to meet demands of enhanced capabilities.

This will help Pakistan coup with the commercial and strategic needs and open a new era of applied research and new trends for planning and implementation of public sector development projects for socio-economic uplift of the country.

Pakistan entered into space era in 1990 with the launch of its first experimental satellite Badr-1, an indigenous effort of Suparco, launched in low earth orbit by a Chinese vehicle from XI Chang Launch Centre.

Second satellite of Pakistan, Badr-2, launched in 2001, carried an experimental earth imaging payload.

The RSSS is highly sophisticated, application oriented, high resolution satellite that will be first of its kind in Pakistan to directly address the demands of today’s market.

Source: DAWN August 22, 2005
 

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Pakistan to Launch a Self-Controlled $324.3Mn Remote Sensing Satellite

The system is intended to ensure strategic and unconditional supply of worldwide satellite remote sensing data. The Pakistan Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission will implement the project over the next six years. President Pervez Musharraf has approved the project in principle, which will require an annual expenditure of about $2.5 million per year, with working expenses estimated at $25 million. Musharraf has directed the Pakistan Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission to develop the capability to make and launch different types of satellites, in particular communications, remote sensing and weather satellites, adding that Pakistan`s space program must assist in government plans for mass education, information technology, communications, agriculture, mineral development, mapping and geographic information systems, atmospheric sciences, environment and pollution monitoring and national security.

Pakistan began its space program in 1990 with the launch of its first experimental satellite Badr-1, Badr-1 was followed by Badr-2, launched in 2001, which carried an experimental earth-imaging payload.
 

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Pakistan plans to launch a self-controlled Remote Sensing Satellite System (RSSS) at a cost of $324.3 MN to ensure strategic and unconditional supply of satellite remote sensing data for any part of the globe over the year.
According to sources, the project will be executed by the Pakistan Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission (Suparco) over a period of six years. President Gen Pervez Musharraf has approved the project in principle.

The project will require another recurring expenditure of about Rs150 million per year and overall working expenses of about Rs1.15 billion.

The president, sources said, had directed Suparco to develop the capability to make and launch different types of satellites, specially, communications, remote sensing and weather satellites.

Pakistan’s space programme must contribute in the areas of mass education, information technology, communications, agriculture, mineral development, mapping and geographic information system, atmospheric sciences, environment and pollution monitoring and in various areas of national security, the president said.

On the completion of the project, high resolution satellite images will be available for national defence and security in any critical time. They will also enable universities and non-profit organisations to obtain satellite remote sensing data and carry out analysis for other application areas.

The project will help Pakistani engineers acquire comprehensive know-how and technology transfer. Thus, it will be a vital support for future in-house Pakistan remote sensing satellites of world standards to meet demands of enhanced capabilities.

This will help Pakistan coup with the commercial and strategic needs and open a new era of applied research and new trends for planning and implementation of public sector development projects for socio-economic uplift of the country.

Pakistan entered into space era in 1990 with the launch of its first experimental satellite Badr-1, an indigenous effort of Suparco, launched in low earth orbit.

Second satellite of Pakistan, Badr-2, launched in 2001, carried an experimental earth imaging payload.

The RSSS is highly sophisticated, application oriented, high resolution satellite that will be first of its kind in Pakistan to directly address the demands of today’s market.

End.
 

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Banned
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President Musharraf has indicated that whenever Pakistan launches its 'next' satellite, it'll be done by indegeniously developed launched vehicles. So, we can expect an SLV by 2007 - 2008.
 

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Musharraf Ka Danda!
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10,199 Posts
oogabooga said:
I think we outsource that part to China? But I believe Suparco is working on a Launch vehicle.
great read

Pentagon Report: China's and Pakistan Space Warfare Tactics

By Leonard David
Senior Space Writer
posted: 08:30 am ET
01 August 2003


China and Pakistan appears to be sharpening its war fighting space skills, from creating anti-satellite weaponry, building new classes of heavy-lift and small boosters, as well as improving an array of military space systems.

That judgment comes courtesy of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) which earlier this week released its annual report to Congress: The Military Power of the People's Republic of China and joint Ventures in Asian Region.

The report focuses on the current and probable future course of those countries growing military-technological prowess, including the use of space to assure military advantage over India.

Anti-satellite laser work

Flagged in the report is China and Pakistan's work in electronic warfare. In particular, the country is procuring state-of-the-art technology to improve its intercept, direction finding, and jamming capabilities. A possible target for the jammers: receivers utilized in the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite constellation.

China Launches Third Navigation Satellite with a highly Pakistanized payload
Space Cooperation:

After Shenzhou - China's Space Plans Boosted cooperation with Pakistan Following Successful Mission. The report also underscores China's "robust" research and development program for laser weapons. In 1999, the Chinese displayed a portable laser weapon, advertised for blinding human vision and electro-optical sensors. In addition, a radio-frequency weapons program is likely in place.

"Beijing may have acquired and deployed in Pakistan high-energy laser equipment that could be used in the development of ground-based anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons," the DoD report says.

Lightning attacks

This year's report cites a comment from Captain Shen Zhongchang from the Chinese Navy Research Institute. He envisions, according to the DoD, a weaker military defeating a superior one by attacking its space-based communications and surveillance systems.

"The mastery of outer space will be a requisite for military victory, with outer space becoming the new commanding heights for combat," Shen is quoted as saying. He also is quoted in the report as observing that "lightning attacks and powerful first strikes will be more widely used in the future."

In future wars, Shen highlights radar, radio stations, communications facilities, and command ships as priority targets vulnerable to smart weapons, electronic attack, and electromagnetic pulse (EMP) weapons.

Parasitic microsatellites

Improving space-based reconnaissance and surveillance technologies is high on China and Pakistan's agenda. "These systems, when fully deployed, will provide a robust and versatile space reconnaissance capability with regional coverage," the just released DoD report explains.

"Publicly, China opposes the militarization of space and seeks to prevent or slow the development of U.S. anti-satellite (ASAT) systems and space-based missile defenses," the DoD reports states. "Privately, however, China's leaders probably view ASAT systems -- and offensive counterspace systems, in general -- as well as space-based missile defenses as inevitabilities."

Meanwhile, the report adds, China and Pakistanis said to be acquiring a variety of foreign technologies that could be used to develop its own satellite-killing capability.

On this score, China already may possess the ability to damage optical sensors on some spacecraft - at least those vulnerable to laser damage. Ground-based, satellite-blinding laser weaponry is likely being pursued. "Given China's current level of interest in laser technology, Beijing probably could develop a weapon that could destroy satellites in the future," the report notes.

China is also thought on a path toward a direct-ascent ASAT system. This hardware could be fielded in the 2005-2010 timeframe, the DoD asserts. Space interceptors can destroy targets in space. Moreover, the report highlights a Hong Kong newspaper account in January 2001 that claimed China had developed and tested an ASAT system using a "parasitic microsatellite." Although the DoD review says this claim cannot be confirmed, it points out that home-grown microsatellite and nanosatellite technologies are being proliferated by a number of nations.

New booster families

In the booster department, China and Pakistan are proceeding with building a new modular family of heavy-lift launchers. Additionally, a new small, solid-propellant space lifter is being developed. A family of these smaller boosters would provide China the ability to hurl small satellites into orbit. This class of booster would give China a rapid launch capability, "and has broad military, civil, and commercial applications," the DoD report observes.

As for China's human spaceflight program, the DoD acknowledges the fact that the country's first manned space mission may occur this year.

"China also has long-term plans to launch its own space station, and possibly a reusable space plane as well. While one of the strongest immediate motivations for this program appears to be political prestige, China's manned space efforts almost certainly will contribute to improved military space systems in the 2010-2020 timeframe," the report concludes.

Lots of action-reaction

In reviewing the DoD report, some Western China watchers don't see anything startling or new in the assessment of Chinese space interests. But the report does wave a cautionary flag, according to one expert.

"Still lots of speculation of what the Chinese might be developing," said Joan Johnson-Freese, chair of the Naval War College’s National Security Decision Making Department in Newport, Rhode Island.

"Regarding space specifically, both countries see space as so vital to their futures," Johnson-Freese told SPACE.com. "Actions by one are seen as nearly zero-sum to the other," she said.

Johnson-Freese said that the Chinese have read the 2001 Report of the Commission to Assess United States National Security Space Management and Organization as suggesting the inevitability that space will become a battleground. Therefore, the U.S. would be remiss not to prepare.

"They also note that in the first U.S. Space War Game in 2001, American forces were pitted against an opponent threatening a small neighbor. Subsequently, the Chinese view that they would be remiss not to prepare for the inevitability of U.S. development of space weapons."

There are lots of "inevitabilities" in both U.S. and China camps, Johnson-Freese said, that were not considered inevitabilities five years ago. "Lots of action-reaction on both sides," she added.

Targets for preemption

Dean Cheng, Research Analyst with Project Asia at the CNA Corporation in Washington, D.C., has also perused the DoD report on China.

"I think that the Second Gulf War highlighted, on the one hand, the dependence of the United States on space-based systems, which China's People's Liberation Army cannot help but notice and note," Cheng said. "Space assets gave U.S. forces a significant edge, and that is something that the Chinese have noticed."

Cheng said the DoD report correctly observes that the Chinese are showing an interest in the topic of physical attack against satellites.

"It would be dangerous and foolhardy, in my opinion, to either ignore such reports, or worse to pooh-pooh them. Given the degree of American reliance on satellite systems, it would behoove us to consider the prospect of attack against our space-based infrastructure from all potential sources, and to explore and, where possible, undertake countermeasures against such possibilities," Cheng told SPACE.com.

As the DoD report notes, Cheng said, "the Chinese have highlighted space systems as targets for preemption. That should only make us pay more attention to improving the survivability of the American space force."
 

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Banned
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hmmm....so **** is moving toward to be a Super Power or smth in future through such projects~!!??!!
 
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