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Are there any useful station plans that can help with navigation when entering stations or changing between lines? The corridors at St Lazare/CdG-Etoile/Bastille/Republique seem to be really tangled and hard to navigate

Why were they built like that?
In older stations, transfer corridors were often thought to be crossed in both directions initially. This started to cause some problems in the 1950's, when the passenger trafic rised and the train frequency was much lower than it is nowadays. This was leading to very crowded trains generating huge waves of passengers. The situation was sometimes so critical that people had to queue in order to leave the platforms. You can see that well in that picture:



In order to better control flows, they even installed gates at the entrance to platforms to prevent people from coming in when the train was arriving (those gates were deeply hated by everyone in those days).



I think it's in the same period they decided to generalize one-way corridors as much as possible, so that passengers wouldn't clog the people coming in the opposite direction. Many of those corridors weren't meant to be used this way at first, which explains why they sometimes look a bit like a maze, but signage is usually rather good. As a matter of fact, there could be real shortcuts if you would take some corridors in the opposite way, but you risk a fine if you do that! I'm often tempted though. :D


I actually remember several corridors getting built occasionally here or there in the metro, it's not that frequent indeed. Minato ku probably knows more about that.
 

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Nutfield sounds even funnier in English :gossip:
Except it's not nutfield at all.

First of all these are the names of two different municipalities (one is Noisy-le-Grand, the other is Champs-sur-Marne). Since the station is at the border of both municipalities, it is called "Noisy-Champs").

Then Noisy, Nuciacum in Medieval Latin, has nothing to do with nuts (nux/nucis in Latin). That's a folk etymology. The more likely origin is much more typical and mundane: the name of an ancient Gallo-Roman landlord (the name "Nautius" has been suggested), with the typical Gallo-Roman place ending -acum, which, in the Paris Region, ended up being pronounced and written -y (hence the many place names ending in -y in the Paris Region).

This -acum ending was found all across Celto-Roman Europe, it gave -y in the Paris Region, it gave -og in Wales, -ack/-ick in Cornwall, -ach and -ich in Germany (the city of Jülich for example), -ik/-ijk in Flanders, -ac in Southern France (which is why what the French know as Tolbiac the German know as Zülpich, it's the same place, Tolpiacum in Latin, with typical t>z evolution in German, and -acum>-ich evolution, whereas the French name is not based on the Paris Region dialect, hence the reason why it kept a form closer to Latin, whereas in the Paris Region it would probably have become something like Touchy). Another example is the frequent Gallo-Roman place name Campaniacum (estate (-acum) of Campanius), which gave Kempenich in German, Champigny in the Paris Region dialect, Campigny in coastal Normandy (where the hard c of Latin was preserved, whereas the Parisian dialect softened it into ch, hence castle in English vs château in French, since the English word is based on coastal Normand dialects whereas the French word is based on the Parisian dialect), Campagnac in Southern France, closest to Gallo-Roman as always, Champagné in Western France, etc.

As for Champs-sur-Marne, it is the very frequent Gallo-Roman place name "Campus", which means countryside, cultivated lands, and this particular one is the "cultivated lands upon the Marne river".

Noisy-le-Grand was the seat of a royal residence during the Merovingian kings, hence the moniker "le Grand" (to distinguish from Noisy-le-Sec, which was originally called Noisy-le-Petit).

Champs-sur-Marne has a beautiful 17th century château which was built by two successive landlords who were among the financiers financing the wars of Louis XIV. The first one almost ended up in the Bastille for embezzlement, but died just before his arrest warrant was issued. As for the second one, he was also accused of embezzlement after Louis XIV died in 1715 and had his properties confiscated by the Regent.



That's what's fascinating about all these Parisian suburbs. They all have a great history behind.

The park of the Château de Champs is beautiful and freely accessible to the public. It extends down the hill all the way to the Marne river.



 

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Guys, I plan to release a Paris Metro map from 30 June 1952, and I would like to know what corrections I need to make:

Link to draft map (sorry I cannot embed from Google Drive).
More than 10 years ago, I've created a slideshow with 132 slides showing all the evolution of the metro from 1900 to 2005: not only extensions and evolutions of services but renamed stations as well. I've just reuploaded a PDF version here:
https://www.international-football.net/files/metro/paris-metro-evolution-1900-2005.pdf

If you download it and open it with Acrobat reader, the slides creates an animation in simply scrolling the mouse.

Here is the slide for June 30th, 1952:





I haven't checked all stations names but it seems to fit with what I did for the metro. However, I don't have suburban rail and that's probably where they may be some corrections. I think "ligne des Coteaux" from Issy to Puteaux should better be considered separate from St-Lazare to Versailles RD line as it had its own tracks. You've also forgotten Saint-Nom-la-Bretêche as a destination of that Versailles line which is a terminus on a separate branch.

That's about all I could see. Here's a link to a rather detailed 1972 map of metro and train which does fit with yours for rail services (and it moved little over those 20 years):
https://bibliotheques-specialisees.paris.fr/ark:/73873/pf0000856476/v0001.simple.selectedTab=record
 

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Out of the slideshow, I've just created a little animated gif showing the evolution of the Paris metro every 5 years from 1900 to 2005:

 

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I know I have to correct Censier - Daubeton to Censier - Daubenton as well, it has been slow because my health remains really poor.

EDIT: New draft is posted. <-- Superseded by post #6348.
 

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That Croix Rouge restaurant will probably have the most polluted air of any restaurant in the world. Thanks, but I won't be a client!

PS: Air pollution inside the Paris Métro reaches 12 times the levels of outdoor air pollution.
Why this incredible air pollution inside the Paris Metro?
 

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Paris Metro corridors

In older stations, transfer corridors were often thought to be crossed in both directions initially. This started to cause some problems in the 1950's, when the passenger trafic rised and the train frequency was much lower than it is nowadays. This was leading to very crowded trains generating huge waves of passengers. The situation was sometimes so critical that people had to queue in order to leave the platforms. You can see that well in that picture:



In order to better control flows, they even installed gates at the entrance to platforms to prevent people from coming in when the train was arriving (those gates were deeply hated by everyone in those days).



I think it's in the same period they decided to generalize one-way corridors as much as possible, so that passengers wouldn't clog the people coming in the opposite direction. Many of those corridors weren't meant to be used this way at first, which explains why they sometimes look a bit like a maze, but signage is usually rather good. As a matter of fact, there could be real shortcuts if you would take some corridors in the opposite way, but you risk a fine if you do that! I'm often tempted though. :D


I actually remember several corridors getting built occasionally here or there in the metro, it's not that frequent indeed. Minato ku probably knows more about that.

as of my knowledge, the in- and outbound were separate build from very early time, but I must agree - have no luggage when travelling with metro and need to intersect. long ways with up and down steps...

the acces doors to the platform "portillon automatique" were not established at all stations! only heawy used ones at the entrance to the platform to stopp movement and hold the peplle to jump into the train, because this became a problem. However these are out of service sinde a long time.
 

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Just like in any other underground railway station. Dust from tunnel, dust from trains and rails in a closed room, no space for flying away.
It is not something special for Paris.
I would expect the rubber tyred lines to be worse than the conventional lines, which is more specific to Paris
 

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I know I have to correct Censier - Daubeton to Censier - Daubenton as well, it has been slow because my health remains really poor.

EDIT: New draft is posted.
Thanks for this Antje.

I have a question about the stations that you picture in gray. What does that mean precisely? Among those, we can see some which have been permanently closed in 1939 (Croix Rouge, Saint-Martin, Arsenal) and others which have been reopened later (Liège, Varenne, Rennes).

Were they all closed in 1952?
 

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If I recall correctly, it was only in 1967 that the final decision was made to close Arsenal, Champ de Mars, Cluny, Croix Rouge and Saint-Martin. I will add a note to the map.
 

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Haxo, the Paris metro station which never opened.
A bit creepy...



Technically, it is not the only station which has been built yet never opened. We can mention as well Porte Molitor
, Orly-Sud
, Elysées La Défense
and La Défense Michelet
 
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