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@Minato
Are crowds regulated on the RER (and on the metro system). I mean when it gets seriously overcrowded, have the authorities introduce a system to control crowds (like porticos, red lights, or man stopping the crowds).
In normal times I mean, not during strikes.

I was quite surprised to see people surprised when guards forbid them to get on the platforms when it got extremely busy... Are parisian not accustomed to crowd control during normal times?
 

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Manuel, personnaly I have never seen anything like this, when the RER is very crowded you either push your way through or just wait for the next one.

macpolo, why are you bringing politics into this?
 

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@Minato
Are crowds regulated on the RER (and on the metro system). I mean when it gets seriously overcrowded, have the authorities introduce a system to control crowds (like porticos, red lights, or man stopping the crowds).
In normal times I mean, not during strikes.

I was quite surprised to see people surprised when guards forbid them to get on the platforms when it got extremely busy... Are parisian not accustomed to crowd control during normal times?
Porticos have been put in place in 1921 in the corridors of the metro.
I remenber when I was young (20 years ago), in the corridors of St Lazare (L13) there were 2 lanes (separated by a barrier) for the 2 directions (St Denis or Asnières) and 2 porticos that were opened alternatively.

It was like this, I think there are still here in some stations but they should not work anymore...



In 1947:

 

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These porticos were strongly despised by the population. Indeed, they were closing access to platforms at the arrival of trains, before they were stopped. Thus, they were felt by passengers as a useless feature which was only there to annoy them.

According to the RATP, these porticos were supposed to make trains stopping time in station shorter considering that it would cut a continuous flow of passengers. One must remember that at the time the system was saturated. Indeed, even if the annual ridership was far lower than today, trains needed more time to accelerate and slow down, doors weren't fully automatic and there wasn't screens for drivers to help them figuring out the good moment to close the doors. As a result, there were agents in each train who went on the platform at each station to get a quick glance on it and make a sign to the driver once it was ok. Well, all this to say that at the time, there were generally only a train every 4 or 5 minutes depending on lines during rush hours. That's about twice less as nowadays.

Anyway, when the MP59 and the MF67 rolling stocks replaced the old sprague trains, train frequency could significantly increase. As a result, the old procedure of porticos became indeed something having no other purpose than to annoy people. And these porticos first stopped being used, and now are even totally dismantled.
 

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RER C



The line runs from Pontoise (C1), Versailles – Rive Gauche (C5) and Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (C7) to Massy-Palaiseau (C2), Dourdan-la-Forêt (C4), Saint-Martin d'Étampes (C6) and Versailles – Chantiers (C8)

First inauguration : 1979
Length : 185.6 km (115.3 miles)
Number of stops : 84
Line C was created in 1979 by connecting the Gare d'Orsay railway terminus (now Musée d'Orsay) with the Invalides terminus of the Rive Gauche line to Versailles, along the banks of the Seine. In 1988 the Argenteuil branch opened, using most of the infrastructure of the old SNCF Auteuil line and connecting to the line's main trunk at Champ de Mars-Tour Eiffel via a curved bridge (the only one in Paris) over the Seine river.

500,000 passengers use this line everyday.


Rolling stocks
Z 5600


Z 20500


I don't know what problem have the SNCF with the RER, but this line has to many branch and is to cheaply build to be really efficient. :eek:hno:
It is not really a RER line for me.
 

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You know Minato, I used to bash a lot the RER C and D, especially because I find these lines amazingly confusing as soon as you have to use one of the many branches, and also because their frequency is not always very satisfying.
Now I am not a regular user of these lines since I live and work in central Paris, where only the lines A and B are really useful for a "stricto sensu" Parisian. And since then, I have met a lot of people commuting on these lines, who told me they were actually more satisfied with their commuting on the RER C and D than the RER B for instance. A lot of people in my office live in the south western suburbs (Versailles, Plaisir, etc.) and are quite happy with the RER C, as long as they know the trains schedule: they always get a seat, it's on time, safe and relatively clean...
 

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Of course the RER C is quite confortable and less crowded than the RER B, but the frequency outside the central section is very low.
It is like seing that you prefer the line 10 at the line 1 of Paris Metro.
But in reality wich is better the line 1 or the line 10 ?

The SNCF section of the RER B is not great, always a problem with the SNCF RER.
the RATP section is very good, but it is affected by the problem of the SNCF section. :eek:hno:
 

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Not really it is the case in the RER B. (A big difference beteween the north and the southern part)

The RER C working well but it has too many branchs, train not adapted (Only two doors per cars :weird:) and low platform.
I see that the RATP do a very well jobs in high capacity urbain trains and the SNCF do not.
Why ?

I have proof, The 5 busiest line in Paris region are all RATP or partially : RER A (busiest section RATP), RER B (busiest section RATP), line 1, line 4, line 13 The RER D and C wich are over the hundred kilometers are after these.
Why ?
Because their trains are not adapted, the frequecies (outside central section) are too low.

Imagine the RER A or B with these train, only two doors per cars and not adapted at crowd.


Of course the metro and RER A or B rolling stocks lack of longitudinal seat wich affecting the train capacity but it is a way better than the rolling stocks of the RER C and D.

I must admit that it is better with the RER E.
 

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Picture of the strike by Metropole

Gare de Lyon
Like the average rush hour but with a lower frequency (30 minutes instead of 90 second)




Magenta
I should said that I have never see crowd in this line, it have capacity of 80,000 travellers per hour for each direction but have only 200,000 passengers per day.


Anyway the strike is over. :)
 

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The worst RER line, with low frequency, delays and a murder the last week. :(

The RER D is one of the five lines in the RER Rapid transit system serving Paris.

The line officially runs from Orry-la-Ville - Coye (D1) to Melun (D2) and Malesherbes (D4). In reality, some trains continue to Creil except during rush hours, and the link between Juvisy-sur-Orge and Melun via Corbeil-Essonnes is operated by RER D

First inauguration : September 27, 1987
Length : 160.0 km (99.4 miles)
Number of stops : 59 (including Corbeil-Essonnes Melun branch, Chantilly and Creil)
Line D links the Gare du Nord with the Gare de Lyon via Châtelet - Les-Halles. The section north of the Gare du Nord opened in the late 1980s; a dedicated tunnel opened in 1995 to connect it to the SNCF network south of the Gare de Lyon, part of which was transferred to the RER.

500,000 passengers use this line everday.



Rolling stock
Z20500 at Malesherbes (southern terminal station)


Evry-Courcouronnes
 

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The RER E is one of the five lines in the RER Rapid transit system serving Paris, France.

The line runs from Haussmann St-Lazare (E1) to Chelles Gournay (E2) and Tournan (E4)

First inauguration : 1999
Length : 52.3 km (32.5 miles)
Number of stops : 21

Line E runs from Haussmann - St-Lazare via Magenta (serving Gare de l'Est and Gare du Nord) to the north-eastern suburbs. It was originally referred to as the EOLE, or Est Ouest Ligne Express.

200,000 passengers per day.



MI2N EOLE



 
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