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Observations made by Hong Kong Observatory during partial solar eclipse today
Wednesday, July 22, 2009
Government Press Release

Source : http://fotop.net/invisible







A partial solar eclipse was visible in Hong Kong from 8.15am to 10.46am today (July 22), with the maximum eclipse occurring at 9.26am. The weather was mainly fine during the eclipse. Although the sun was occasionally blocked by clouds, the eclipse was still visible for a long period from many places in Hong Kong. Figure 1 shows the image of the solar eclipse photographed by the Hong Kong Observatory.

Affected by the solar eclipse and variations in the cloud amount, the King's Park meteorological station recorded decreases in the ultra-violet index (Fig. 2), solar radiation (Fig. 3) and temperature (Fig. 4). Temperatures over the territory (Fig. 5) generally fell slightly, and were lower than those at the same time yesterday, with the maximum fall close to 3 degrees Celsius.

Figures : http://www.info.gov.hk/gia/general/200907/22/P200907220223.htm
 

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Rush for best spots out of this world
23 July 2009
The Standard

Thousands flocked to various sites in Hong Kong to witness a partial eclipse of the sun yesterday morning.

The eclipse, which began at 8.15am, lasted for an hour and a half and more than 2,300 stargazers turned up at the Hong Kong Space Museum to take turns at the telescopes and sun spotters provided.

``I arrived at 6am. This is my first time to view an eclipse,'' 11-year-old Man Tin-hang said.

He and his grandfather were the first in line and after a brief turn at the telescope, he exclaimed joyfully: ``It's worth getting up early for!''

Attendance topped 2,056, much more than the 600 slots allocated, according to assistant museum curator So Chu-wing.

``Those viewing the eclipse exceeded 600 before 8am,'' said So, adding 293 visitors were also admitted to the museum's live broadcasting venues to watch the mainland's full eclipse on screen.

More than 1,000 people flocked to Tuen Mun's Po Leung Kuk Leung Chow Shun Kam Primary School to view the phenomenon there.

``The weather is fantastic, unlike Shanghai where the eclipse cannot be clearly seen because of the thick clouds and heavy rain,'' Hong Kong Astronomical Society vice president Huey Pang said.

The society provided equipment for the 1,000 enthusiastic skywatchers at the school who had enrolled online.

Among the equipment was an 8.5-inch reflector telescope, the largest of its kind in Hong Kong.

For those without fancy gear, the eclipse was less than spectacular. Edwin Liem, associate director at an investment bank, walked out of his Mid- Levels home at 9.15am without special equipment.

``It was sort of overcast. I couldn't tell the moon was blocking the sun even though it was darker than usual,'' Liem said. ``I was a bit disappointed as I expected Hong Kong to be a lot darker than it was.''
 

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Astronomy fans venture out for partial solar eclipse
RTHK Excerpt
June 21, 2020






Ming Pao

Hong Kong was treated on Sunday to its last major partial solar eclipse for another decade or so, with almost 90 percent of the sun blocked by the passing moon at one point.

Excited photographers and astronomy buffs gathered at prime viewing locations across Hong Kong with their specialist equipment in tow, to safety observe the eclipse through shielded telescopes, dark solar filters, and even homemade pin-hole contraptions.

“It’s so pretty!” one primary student said, as the moon’s shadow started taking a bite into the sun at 2.37pm.

Many school-children who were among a large crowd that gathered at the Kwun Tong Promenade told RTHK this was their first time to witness this celestial event.

“It’s so rare, we won’t have the chance to see it again for a long time”, another student said.

The clear skies allowed the crowds to enjoy a good view of the moon’s passage for much of the time until the phenomenon ended at 5.24pm.

More : https://news.rthk.hk/rthk/en/component/k2/1533298-20200621.htm
 
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