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You Ain't No Patron Saint
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pasay is an entrepot for everyone's commerce, a port of call for airlines of all nations, a destination for cargo, a junction for currencies, and an inviting place for anyone to make some cold, hard cash. Natives and foreigners of all kinds, like traders of old, are forever coming and going.


The urge for profit, the taste for good living, the flair for the best there is, the drive, the energy, the mayhem- everything is here. East and West merge in the city streets. The circumstances are truly exciting. Their chances of wealth are real. Opportunities knock not once but often, and with much urgency. There is a raffish and vagabond element in the chase for the gold that holds the future in thrall.


There seems to be a single-minded obsession with the making of money, any which way one can. There is also the perpetual pursuit of an underlying security, which makes everything more tense, more nervous. Everyone, rich or poor, of every age and race, is frankly out fir the big break. Pasay is not a place of pathos, perhaps not the right environment for the pious that crowds the nearby Baclaran church. Pasay has always been a venue for free enterprise, a town of services, trade, finance, insurance, real estate, transport, manufacturing, entertainment, public utilities, and so on and so forth. The stress of Pasay's industriousness is best seen when the day's work begins and ends and the transport system are strained. Then the light come on and Pasay braces for the night. The night is another day.


Like it or not, Pasay offers a brazen bazaar for instant opportunism. It swarms with speculators of every sort, building properties and selling them, buying into one another's business, selling each other out, plotting joint ventures or scheming takeover bids. It offers a window of entry for foreigners. Today they have their fingers in every pot - investment firms, banks, hotels, restaurants and stores. The Japanese, for instance, are back in full force and confidence. Their products dominate the landscape. Toyotas, Nissan and Hondas are everywhere; so are Sony's and Panasonics. The Philippines stock market would be thinner without their yen; the bars and massage parlors would languish were it not for their patronage.


Know more about Pasay : http://www.pasay.gov.ph
 

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You Ain't No Patron Saint
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Transportation

From a pilot's vantage point, one sees the sprawl of Pasay's usual urban landmarks: multi-story structures of glass and steel towering over low-level houses, amid pockets of tropical vegetation.

Height and distance of course lend enchantment, Prowling around on foot, however, reveals a city that seethes and hisses like a cauldron, enmeshed in a labyrinth of streets and anguished with the ills that perplex most cities-population pressure, housing shortages, slums, smog, juvenile delinquency, crime, inadequate water supply, and the curse of the automobile. The pace of life is so unremitting and the sense of survival so unrelenting that one gets overwhelmed by the sheer volume of human commotion and mechanical motion. And yet not far from the chaos can be found a way of life (opposite page) essentially unchanged for centuries.


On the surface, Pasay looks modern, without a trace of the past, at least as far as there is any visible, tangible evidence of it. But the harrowed earth and the fish traps (page 12) speak of past datus and dayang-dayangs. Where the city now spreads, small villages once thrived, and in some parts, still for (opposite). Rice was once cultivated in fields now under cement and shrines dedicated to gods of fertility and abundance stood among groves now buried under high-rises. But perhaps without knowing it, the farmers of today are drawing upon these deep wellsprings from which a great part of their cultural - not just their religion - flows. Pasay still has roots that run deep into its past. Beyond a cluster of trees, people still tend their chickens in coops, grow fruits, water their plots with sprinklers (opposite below, ) and sow and reap according to the dictate of nature. Village life remains resilient and ancestral.


But the people who wake up to the crowing of cooks are a vanishing tribe compared to the swelling numbers of those who jar themselves from sleep by click, phone, or the racket of radio. They leap out of dwellings of various sizes and costs, rush through doors and gates, and burst forth onto the streets, causing a huge ceaseless rumble and tumult all through the day. Cars and buses rush by like grunting, charging bulls, and then groan to sudden stops to load or unload. The avenues are choked with the metal flow of vehicles (above). The streets whirl like a vortex of frenetic activity. Jumbo jetliners sheiks down like giant seabirds, not quite two hundred feet above the light railway trains, or LRTs hurtling from one turbulent station to the next. One can only imagine the flaring tempers that arise from this chaos. Crowded street in Pasay subject its citizens to stress in many forms, not least in the agile competition for elbow room, which calls for a series of bumping, halting, and quick sidestepping any which way one is inclined.


Everywhere in Pasay one confronts the salary man culture: the never-ending pursuit of middle-class security and status symbols; the new religion of "my home," "my car," "my children's school." But it is this driven sector, this vast rather homogeneous, and uninspiring mass of commuters, who are largely responsible for keeping the wheels of the economy turning relentlessly forward, filling and emptying its cornucopia of goods and services.


The ways to go around are varied. Most public transport is by bus, jeepney, LRT, and tricycles. The Traffic is an agony. Parking is a headache. The city is always a street behind, a flyover short. There is catching up to do. On weekdays, congestion at rush hour keeps speeds on Pasay's main arteries down to 11 KPH - about as fast as a bicycle. The lowly two-wheeler would have a somewhat more auspicious setting on a village's main street but it is an appropriate symbol of the past when pitted against the soaring future in the form of a jetliner, parked within spitting distance from it (opposite page). This is just one of so many striking contrasts that collide with each other at every turn in this city.


Both the domestic and international airports are in Pasay and these serve to conduct the city's intercourse with the outside world. Pasay greets an advantage of two searches of better chances in foreign lands. At any given time there are a dozen aircraft parked before the terminal. The tricolor of Philippine Airlines aircraft predominates. PAL, as locals call it, is the nation's official carrier, noted for its pretty, smiling, and stewardesses. Next to the PAL Boeings and Airbuses are aircraft from JAL, Cathay Pacific, Singapore Airlines, Thai Airways, Lufthansa, United and Northwest. Most are long-haul 747s or new Airbuses.


Pasay is a crossroad, a junction, a meeting point. The standard icebreaker would be "Where are you from?' People come by bus and train; others by car and airplane. They come from every part of the country and the world. Arrivals and departures spark a good deal of the social machinery but "machineries" might be more accurate, according to economic classes. Both classes are driven by the motor; work, the duly to make a living, the ambition to acquire status step by step, the need to affirm earning purposes, but the yields are worlds apart. Wealth and poverty are close neighbors in Pasay, and this much they have in common: the sight of one another is frightening.


The vast majority of Pasay's poor citizens are jampacked in places that are often defined by the way people conduct their daily lives. The city is full of Ilocanos, Pampangos, Bicolanos, Ilonggos and Cebuanos, and vernacular accents and high-pitched chatter is heard among the tenements, even as their rival music clash through the walls. They are squeezed into rooms, surrounded with all the standard manifestations of modern accessory: the garish bric-a-brac, the gaudy furniture, the potted plastic plants massed on tables and shelves, although a good number of the shanties triumphantly flaunt their television aerials.


Housing projects struggle to keep pace with the exploding population. Villages on the perimeter of the airport complex - Villamor, Aero, and Rivera - are small, quiet communities where the sing-song cries of street vendors replace the roar of traffic. Here, their separateness is maintained by street too narrow for large vehicles and by the absence of street names, providing a sense of cozy isolation for the inhabitants.


So do the old residences that continue to defy the encroaching structures of glass and steel and the frenzied pace of a surging metropolis. Most of the owners lead quiet lives. Their houses, sometimes situated on busy streets, lie hidden behind tall fences. They face in, not out. But in a city convulsed by a fury of construction, they provide a continuity that transcends the endings and beginnings of the physical city. In their defiance they present a way of life as profound as their appearances. Many of these houses are reminders of long-gone days.
 

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You Ain't No Patron Saint
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
HOTELS

Everywhere in Pasay one confronts the salary man culture: the never-ending pursuit of middle-class security and status symbols; the new religion of "my home," "my car," "my children's school." But it is this driven sector, this vast rather homogeneous, and uninspiring mass of commuters, who are largely responsible for keeping the wheels of the economy turning relentlessly forward, filling and emptying its cornucopia of goods and services.

Many of the business firms in Pasay are engaged, in one way or another, in the visitors' trade, whether as an extension of the transport industry, or as a useful adjunct to real estate, or even as a source of foreign currency. Pasay has become a great center for international congresses and trade exhibitions and symposia of every imaginable type and size. There are hundreds of these gathering every year. Filipinos, by nature hospitable and gregarious people, enjoy organizing meetings and conventions of cardiologists, surgeons, accountants, economists, businessmen, lawyers, retailers, Jaycees, Rotarians, and scuba divers. They move people about by the hundreds with the precision of ballet troupes and with that genuine Malayan delight in ceremony.


To house this multitude Pasay has three five-star hotels - the Westin Philippine Plaza by the bay and the Heritage and Hyatt along Roxas Boulevard. The Philippine Village Hotel is a stone's throw way from the Ninoy Aquino International Airport and the Traders (formerly the Holiday Inn) is right across from the Cultural Center. Most of them were built in 1976, in anticipation of the arrival of delegates to the International Monetary Fund conference. Great fortunes have been made from the hotel industry, and several merchant and sugar families have been hoteliers at one time or another. In obscurer sites, especially among the winking and knowing streets of San Rafael, are a great number of motels, ranging from modestly respectable lodging to houses of frank disrepute.
 

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You Ain't No Patron Saint
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
RESTAURANTS

High above, on the roofs of tall building, brilliant neon signs proclaim a variety of logos and products. Glowing, flashing and bustling, ritzy hotels and restaurants on Roxas Boulevard beckon to big-spending local and foreign businessmen with expense accounts. In between them, Carinderias and beer joints, speckled with paler lights, send their own signals for the weary worker to take it easy and to have a drink before turning home.

Elsewhere the city dazzles with the riot of small neon signs flashing messages in all the color of the rainbow. Vast panoply of neon advertisements lends the whole area a gaudy glow. Huge signs march one behind another far down the boulevard, their design determined by the variety of their entertainment - cinemas, bowling alleys, carnival rides, restaurant, beer joints, dance hall, and massage parlors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
PLACES OF INTEREST

Far from the dragon sounds of Pasay's frenetic streets is the Nayong Pilipino, or Philippine Cultural Village, a thirty-five hectare oasis of rustic tranquility that helps make life tolerable amid the frenzied pace of an otherwise overwhelming city. Closed to wheeled traffic, only a selected number of jeepney (above) is allowed to take visitors around this civic nature reserve. The park is planned to hundreds of species of flowers and trees where a startling variety of birds nest and breed (opposite page). Here Pasayeños come in ones and twos and in groups to breaths the fresh air, collect their thoughts, and be themselves.

But the Nayong Pilipino is more than just a park; it is the Philippines in a nutshell. Around the wide lagoon in the center, created by workers who kept digging until they reached the water table, are six regions depicted by landmarks and landscapes typical of each. The Mountain Province is recreated on an elevated clearing with rice terraces, Ifugao huts and hills planted to pine trees. Mainly Vigan, The capital of Ilocos Sur, represents the Northern Province, which was a powerful bishopric during the Spanish times. The Vigan house in the heart of the village was built out of parts actually transported beam for beam, railing for railing, tile for tile, from its original site.


The perfect sulphur cone of Mayon Volcano and the ruins of the Cagsawa Church synthesize Bicolandia. The Tagalog Region displays a plaza reminiscent of old pueblos while the Visayan section features a house of Spanish Design, with a paseo shaded by trellised walks. The Muslim region is recreated through a Maranaw Mosque and a Tausug stilt house.


Tourism was the impetus for the park's development. The buildings were obviously intended to become attractions unto themselves. Inside a number of them are weavers working at their looms and carver chiseling at wood. But if nothings else, the structures so perfectly blend with the surroundings, and in moments of weather changes and personal distress, they offer shelter, convenience, and comfort.


Everybody is welcome to partake of the park's serenity and grace. There are wooded acres, nooks and byways that can be enjoyed by tourism, sportsmen, health faddist, retirees taking their ease, and youths letting off steam. People can relax with family and friends, play cards or chess, or indulge in two national pastimes - eating and gossiping.


There is a lot of activity everywhere but it is relaxed activity. Although children swarm over the "Chocolate Hills," most adults avoid anything more strenuous than a gentle row on the lake. Strollers walk at a sedate pace, watch open-air performance and concerts, or just let the hours tick way in some secluded, sun-dappled corner. The quietude that envelops the place is a miracle of the fact that one can live in the heart of Pasay and yet a short ride away lies a park that is oblivious to the ruckus of the city, a bucolic setting that preserves a small town's intimate charm, a sanctuary that provides a sense of cozy isolation where one finds a truly quiet corner.


The pleasures of Roxas Boulevard are varied, from costly to cheap to free. The palm-fringed thoroughfare continues to hold sway over the crescent of Manila Bay, taking visitors for a breezy welcome ride to the heart of the metropolis from the airport, which is a short left turn from its southern end. When the tide is low, men, women and children hike up their clothes and gather shells and clams from the shallows. In summer, they their clothes off and swim in the waters. Every now and then, in the mornings, strollers and joggers are treated to a movie in the making. In the afternoons people gather and jockey for space on the entire stretch of the seawall to get the best seat in town for one of the greatest shows on earth, for free - the famed Manila Bay sunset.
 

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You Ain't No Patron Saint
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ENTERTAINMENT

Whatever prose has been crafted about the sunset is hand-hewn with wonder. The setting is plain: water, weather, sky, and land. But the sun works with a will to stage an awesome drama.

The sun on its way down into the sea takes the viewer by the eye and the hair of the skin. It paints the city with soft pink at five in the afternoon and burns up to a fiery orange at six. The wind ripples the waters and the sun scatters luminous rubies on the ruffles. The trees along the bay all take on the same color, turning rose and purple while the wind shakes their leaves which hand down to the ground their crimson forms. The shadows of the viewers leap up on the sides of the trunks or are flung upon the ground as the light, the day's final benediction, touches their faces with the cooling fingers of sea breezes.


Then suddenly the sun drops. The drama has no act for twilight after sundown. But long before the sun goes down the theater revels in the changing cloud and color display. It covers well half the heavens and the glowing colors changes rapidly, reflected by the entire bay. The rays of white light streak toward the shore in long slanting lines across a world growing dim in grays and finally to mysterious black as the last bright streak fades from the sky when the final curtain comes down.


But before darkness sets in Pasay turns on its lights. Orange beacons like illuminated pumpkins, nark the long roads and avenues while smaller light flash, on has ever flown into Pasay at night is likely to forget the tingle of the experience as the sea unfolds around one's windows, as the myriad lights glitter, first from the lights of the ships at sea and then from the buildings rushing by. One then lands on the light lined runway between two flickering subdivisions, and with the deep dark blue of the bay on one side and the starry blue of the sky for a backdrop, and with all the lights all around, one feel being inside an illuminated bowl.


While fine art, layered and webbed with reference, must be returned to and contemplated upon, performance art offers easier access. The pleasure it evokes is direct and immediate. A single sun radiates on the world of dance and music, and almost everybody can partake of its warmth. The social reach is wider than that of fine art, and it finds the ground for its flourish on hybrid forms of short-impact effects verging on spectacle.

Spectacular performances are often staged at the Cultural Center and the Folk Arts Theater. Through the years, the main theater has served as the venue for local presentations of the Repertory Philippines, Manila Symphony Society, National Philharmonic Society, Hariraya Dance Company, Karilagan Cultural Arts International, and the world-famous Bayanihan Dance Company. In addition, the parks and playgrounds of the Nayong Pilipino are readily convertible into theaters where performing troupes regale their audiences with songs and dances of the different regions.
 

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You Ain't No Patron Saint
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Dati ang Pasay Public Market ang isa sa pinakamadumi at mabahong public market ngayon ito na ang isa sa pinakamaganda Public Market sa buong Pilipinas. Sana ma-maintain ito ng maayos.

 

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You Ain't No Patron Saint
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Home of the following

SM Mall of Asia


PICC


NAIA


GSIS Building (Philippine Senate)



Star City


Nayong Pilipino
 

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You Ain't No Patron Saint
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
additional buildings and offices

World Trade Center


Villamor Airbase


CCP


Coconut Palace


Cuneta Astrodome
 

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Pasay is still one of the most important cities in our country. These developments could rival Makati, Ortigas or QC in the future. I just hope do they something drastic to rehabilitate most their depressed areas.
 

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^^ todo ang haba... :lol:
 

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merung ngang sari sari store somwhere sa antipolo na hinde ko alam yung pangalan nya, pero mas mahaba sa superkalifragelisticexpialidocious hahahahah
 

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Pasay opens business district in reclamation area

By Julie M. Aurelio
Philippine Daily Inquirer

Posted date: March 07, 2008

MANILA, Philippines – A new business district with classy hotels, entertainment centers and docking facilities for yachts and cruise ships is expected to rise in Pasay City’s reclamation area.

Mayor Wenceslao Trinidad signed Wednesday afternoon a memorandum of agreement with the West Marina Bay Development Inc. for the development of idle bay areas or reclaimed shorelines in Pasay.

The P15 billion Pasay Near Shore Development Project is expected to be bigger than the SM Mall of Asia complex that occupies 1.2 square kilometers.

“This MOA is evidence of the confidence of developers in the present city leadership, another big step towards making the city the center of commerce and trade,” Trinidad said.

The project will be developed in three phases on a build-operate-transfer scheme. Each phase will cost P5 billion.

The project will be located just behind the SM Mall of Asia and would cover at least 5 square kilometers, Trinidad said.

“We envisioned this eight years ago. This, apart from what is already in place at the city’s Central Business District, will help us become the prime business and tourist destination in Asia,” the mayor said.

Trinidad signed the contract with Greg Alcera, WMBDI president; Vice Mayor Antonino Calixto and WMBDI officers Mario Concepcion, Alexander Elma, Sheila San Diego and Alvin San Diego.

The project is covered by the city council’s resolution No. 2267 signed Feb. 29, allowing the mayor to appoint any reputable developer as the “integrator and pioneering proponent for the development of existing bay areas near the city’s Central Business District under a Build-Operate-Transfer scheme.”

Source: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/inquir...y-opens-business-district-in-reclamation-area
 
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