SkyscraperCity banner

41 - 60 of 5238 Posts

·
Federer Express!!!
Joined
·
716 Posts

·
Wanderlust
Joined
·
357 Posts
Hi, do any of you guys know what the name of this bridge is?
<img src="http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid112/p8811a34be784bc9177c907707edc18dc/f8fc6933.jpg"></img>
 

·
Registered non-User
Joined
·
7,358 Posts
Thats in the Philippines? Never knew we had a suspension type bridge. i have no idea.

hahaha, look at all those carabao in the water. must be in the Philippines!:D
 

·
Here Since 2002
Joined
·
7,261 Posts
Espana bridge and Jones are quite similar..


THAT is in the Philippines? man..
 

·
Member, Winifred Fan Club
Joined
·
2,973 Posts
SunKing said:
Hi, do any of you guys know what the name of this bridge is?
<img src="http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid112/p8811a34be784bc9177c907707edc18dc/f8fc6933.jpg"></img>
This bridge was actually in Manila and the picture was taken before WWII. I don't remember what it's called, though. But that's the Pasig river in that picture and was replaced by one of the current spans. I believe that's where the current bridge that goes to Quiapo (I forget the name also) is now.
 

·
Member, Winifred Fan Club
Joined
·
2,973 Posts
From Tsinoy.com


HERITAGE - 03/18/2002
Jones Bridge’s Diary
by Anson T. Yu

Since Manila was built on a river delta, it is no surprise then to find that the city is linked together by a network of bridges. And for the residents of Binondo, none is closer to their hearts than Jones Bridge. The bridge has been a part of their lives that it would be inconceivable to think of what life would be like without it.

How about you? Every time you cross this historical landmark, don't you wonder how the Jones Bridge came to be? If you do, read this "diary".

When Binondo was established in 1592, it was linked to Intramuros with a ferry service. Until in 1632, a seven-arch bridge known as the "Puente Grande" or the "Grand Bridge" was inaugurated. It faithfully served the residents of both Intramuros and Binondo till the great quake of 1863 destroyed it.

While a new bridge was being constructed, several rafts were tied together to form a pontoon bridge. This was used to keep traffic moving across the Pasig River. The new bridge began its service on the New Year of 1876, when it was inaugurated as the "Puente España" or the "Bridge of Spain".

Rizal wrote the bridge into literary history when Placido Domingo crossed the bridge on his way to his class at the University of Santo Tomas in "El Filibusterismo". (This was when UST was still located in Intramuros.)

When the Americans came at the beginning of the 20th century and brought along automobiles, car ownership grew. It became apparent then that the Puente Espana was proving inadequate in handling the increased load of traffic.

Along with Daniel Burnham's plans of transforming Manila into a showcase of American colonialism, the bridge was demolished to make way for "Jones Bridge". This was named after William Jones, an American congressman who authored a law advocating full independence for the Philippines.

Perhaps, this was meant to compliment the neo-classical design of the new government buildings in the area. Old photos of the bridge showed that it was very ornate, with elaborate railings and lampposts. Underneath the mid-section of the bridge were two statues on each side.

Unlike other bridges in Manila, Jones Bridge can boast of a gastronomic link. Before well-known restaurateur Ma Mon Luk opened his first mami restaurant, he used to peddle his famous chicken mami at the foot of the bridge every afternoon.

He would arrive with his wares in two large metal containers slung from a bamboo pole. One container would keep the broth, kept warm by the live coal underneath. The other held the noodles, pre-sliced chicken meat, bowls, Chinese soupspoons and scissors.

Wait a minute! Scissors? Yes, that was why people then called the dish "gupit" and not mami as we do today. The reason was that Mr. Ma would hold the noodles up high with his left hand and used the scissors to cut the noodles into a bowl. He also did the same with the chicken meat.

It was said that his mami would attract students from Ateneo and Letran. Also, over a hot bowl of noodle, many a fight over a basketball game was averted. Mr. Ma would counsel the losing team by saying: "Just keep cool! Let's all eat 'gupit'!" Then, he would sit with the boys and tell them stories of the hard life in China at that time.

During the Second World War, the bridge was renamed "Banzai Bridge" by the Japanese, but somehow the name never caught on. When the Japanese sensed that they were losing the war and began their exodus to the south of Manila, they destroyed every bridge over the Pasig River in a bid to slow down the Americans.

Jones Bridge was no exception. After the war, the bridge was rebuilt with American-aid money. It was around that time when the design of the bridge was streamlined with its ornate railings and lamppost removed and replaced with simpler fixtures.

Bombing during the war destroyed one of the statues. The remaining three were removed from the bridge during the renovation work: two were placed at a courthouse's lobby and the other one now rests in Luneta Park next to Rizal Monument.

After years of wear and tear, the bridge underwent extensive refurbishing and renovation in the late 1990's. This was part of a campaign by the former First Lady Amelita Ramos to revive the Pasig River. New lighting fixtures were installed, while the steel railing were replaced with cement railing in an attempt to improve the overall visual appeal. But somehow, it has failed to recapture its original look.

Already a hundred years old, the bridge has faithfully served the residents of Binondo and the rest of Manila day-in and day-out. But in the last few years, I noticed that the bridge has found new use other than ferrying people across the Pasig.

Young boys from nearby shantytowns have taken to jumping off the bridge, not as a suicide bid but as form of diving. Who knows, one of those young boys may grow up and win an Olympic gold medal in a diving competition. This may further add shine to the story of Jones Bridge.
 

·
Member, Winifred Fan Club
Joined
·
2,973 Posts
SunKing said:
Hi, do any of you guys know what the name of this bridge is?
<img src="http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid112/p8811a34be784bc9177c907707edc18dc/f8fc6933.jpg"></img>

So yes, as my preliminary web research confirms, this suspension bridge is in Manila, on the site of the current Quezon Bridge. This pridge was called the Puente Colgante (or hanging bridge).

Found on tsinoy.com:
January 4, 1852 - The first suspension bridge spanning the Pasig River is built. The Puente Colgante &#150; also known as the Puente de Claveria &#150; was demolished in 1938 and replaced by the Quezon Bridge.

Found on Ernie Baron's Knowledge Power:
Patungo sa Quiapo, madadaanan naman ang Quezon Bridge. Itinayo ito noong matapos ang giyera. Sa lugar na ito unang itinayo ng mga Kastila ang tulay na tinaguriang Puente Colgante noong 1852.
Ngunit para lang sa mga tao ang tulay na ito at bawal tumawid ang mga sasakyan. Ginamit ang nasabing tulay hanggang noong 1930s.


Found on newsflash.org:
In the 1930s, the Puente de Colgante gave way to the Quezon (Quiapo) Bridge, one of the earliest metal suspension bridges in the world and, unknown to many, was designed by the company of Gustav Eiffel, who built the world-famous Eiffel Tower of Paris.

So as we can see, we used to have a suspension bridge in Manila. But despite how pretty a suspension bridge can be, it had to be destroyed because it was a pedestrian only bridge (as Ernie Baron explained). Not to worry, though, because the bridge that was built to replace it, the Quezon Bridge also has a great history of its own... it was has links to Gustav Eiffel's firm.

And there you have it.
 

·
Member, Winifred Fan Club
Joined
·
2,973 Posts
SunKing said:
Hi, do any of you guys know what the name of this bridge is?
<img src="http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid112/p8811a34be784bc9177c907707edc18dc/f8fc6933.jpg"></img>

So yes, as my preliminary web research confirms, this suspension bridge was in Manila, on the site of the current Quezon Bridge. This bridge was called the Puente Colgante (or hanging bridge).

Found on tsinoy.com:
January 4, 1852 - The first suspension bridge spanning the Pasig River is built. The Puente Colgante – also known as the Puente de Claveria – was demolished in 1938 and replaced by the Quezon Bridge.

Found on Ernie Baron's Knowledge Power:
Patungo sa Quiapo, madadaanan naman ang Quezon Bridge. Itinayo ito noong matapos ang giyera. Sa lugar na ito unang itinayo ng mga Kastila ang tulay na tinaguriang Puente Colgante noong 1852.
Ngunit para lang sa mga tao ang tulay na ito at bawal tumawid ang mga sasakyan. Ginamit ang nasabing tulay hanggang noong 1930s.


Found on newsflash.org:
In the 1930s, the Puente de Colgante gave way to the Quezon (Quiapo) Bridge, one of the earliest metal suspension bridges in the world and, unknown to many, was designed by the company of Gustav Eiffel, who built the world-famous Eiffel Tower of Paris.

So as we can see, we used to have a suspension bridge in Manila. But despite how pretty a suspension bridge can be, it had to be destroyed because it was a pedestrian only bridge (as Ernie Baron explained). Not to worry, though, because the bridge that was built to replace it, the Quezon Bridge also has a great history of its own... it has links to Gustav Eiffel's firm.

And there you have it.
 

·
Registered non-User
Joined
·
7,358 Posts
Thanks, boyflood:) indeed great research. Too bad it was only pedestrian, would have been cool if was still standing today. It looks great, and if it had colorful lights like the bridges today, it would be awesome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,001 Posts
thanks boybaha for the research, very interesting about the history behind quezon bridge, so eiffel were involved with several projects in manila, example is san sebastian church. does anyone have a photo of quezon bridge? thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,001 Posts
thanks sunking! i thought that was the one, that's my favorite bridge in manila. during the centennial, imo this bridge have the best light effect, ultraviolet light, i think the light was done by architect jorge yulo or ed calma? not sure.

does anyone know if the lights for this bridge still being maintained?
 

·
Here Since 2002
Joined
·
7,261 Posts
ok.. i thought the quezon bridge was the suspension one? that bridge you posted looks like the current Ayala bridge
 

·
Wanderlust
Joined
·
357 Posts
renell said:
ok.. i thought the quezon bridge was the suspension one? that bridge you posted looks like the current Ayala bridge
The suspension bridge is the Puente Colgante, this is the Ayala Bridge:


Ayala Bridge was constructed during the building boom of the 1920s, which is considered to have been Manila's most glittering decade. It was at about the same time that the nation's government center (around present-day Rizal Park) was being developed into a showcase of Neoclassical architecture. Ayala Bridge is counted among the four bridges (the others are Jones Bridge, Quezon Bridge and MacArthur Bridge) that are historically identified with the Pasig River, Manila's main waterway.

Ayala y Compania collaborated with the Eiffel company in the construccion of the Ayala Bridge. Also, Gloria's lolo, Juan Macaraeg aided in building the bridge.
 

·
Registered non-User
Joined
·
7,358 Posts
Quezon Bridge and Ayala Bridge are not suspension bridges. They are cantalever (sp?) bridges, i believe. But yeah they are quite nice bridges. They just need to make it well kept always. There is a lot of rusting taking place.

I like how Ayala bridge links to a hospital island in the middle of Pasig River.:D
 

·
Registered non-User
Joined
·
7,358 Posts
Check this out: Underpass on C-5/Kalayaan intersection. Good project because it does get quite tight over there. Especially once BGC gets going.


"The C-5/Kalayaan interchange will be an underpass along C-5 Road and an overpass bridge along Kalayaan Avenue. Both C-5/Lanuza and C-5/J.Vargas interchanges will be straight flyovers along C-5. The project was deemed necessary to address the traffic congestion on major intersections along C-5 alignment."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
this is interesting... under the Metro Manila Interchange Construction Project 5, it includes the detailed designs of a new set of interchanges:

The project involves the construction of grade separated structures at major intersections along EDSA and C-5 as follows: 1) EDSA/ North Ave.-West Ave. Intersection 2) EDSA/Roosevelt Ave. Intersection 3) C-5/Kalayaan Avenue Intersection 4) C-5/Lanuza St.-Julia Vargas Intersection and Detailed Design of the following: 1) C-3 (Araneta Ave.)/Quezon Ave. Interchange 2) C-3 /E. Rodriguez Ave. Interchange 3) C-3/Sgt. Rivera Ave. Interchange 4) C-2 (Gov. Forbes Ave.)/R-7 (España St.) Interchange
http://www.neda.gov.ph/opm/LoanData.asp?ProjectVar=MMICP V

cool! there will be an interchange at Espana corner Lacson (formerly Gov. Forbes)... I reckon that won't be a depressed structure due to the flood-prone nature of the area... but I wonder how they'll fit a flyover in such a way that it won't conflict with the MRT-4 alignment along Espana.
 
41 - 60 of 5238 Posts
Top