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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In this city there are many corporative building like Xerox and Ernst & Young
and Phoenix is the Golf Capitol of United States.
But it is poor of distractions and amaziness that are found in abundance to Los angeles, New York and San Francisco. To part if it appeals to the life style of cowboys and the deserts and the canyon surrounding.
This are only a few photo collection.
You please yourselves of what the convent passes
Central Ave










Madison Square Garden: not like this of New York


Downtown at Night

Grand Canyon

Bad Place
 

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Nice pix. Phoenix's skyline is tiny for a city of over a million. It looks like a suburb of L.A. or SF. Why are the buildings so short? Is the airport too close to downtown or something? Very suburban.
 

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wow thats a bleak looking city!
 

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Nameless said:
Those pics don't really do it justice though.
I agree. Phoenix is far from being 'urban', but there really is something to be said for the desert beauty and openness of the city.
 

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I am going to quote Phoenix resident Don B., to illustrate what life in Phoenix is really like. Hope you don't mind Don, I thought you summed it up well.

Don B. said:
Phoenix has a good quality of life. Traffic here is not as bad as in most cities of comparable size. With around 4.1 million people spread out over about 1,500 square miles, it is not the densest city in the world, and the automobile does rule here.

It is very clean and smooth, compared to older American cities. With no freezing and thawing, pavement and roads tends to stay intact for far longer than in other places.

Phoenix has a pleasant climate, with highs in the 60s (all temps in Fahrenheit) in the winter, 80s in the spring and fall, and around 100 to 110 degrees from June through September. Most of the summer averages around 107 degrees. It's pretty nice here from October to May. People that live here actually find the winters somewhat nippy, as anything below 70 degrees is considered "cool" by Phoenix standards. Having lived here for 14 years, I can tell you that the temps don't bother me until we start hitting about 105 degrees, which usually begins in early June. This usually stops in late September.

Most homes in Phoenix have pools, so water sports here is huge almost year round. Water volleyball is very popular at parties, especially in the summer.

Phoenix is very casual and laid-back. Ties are the exception, not the norm, even in law offices (I know because I work for one). Standard business attire is a nice shirt and slacks.

Because Phoenix is a resort town with many winter visitors (it is estimated that over one million people come here to live from October to May), we have many fine resorts and restaurants, not to mention a lot of hotels and motels. Tourism is big business here.

Most of the people that live in the Phoenix metro area today are refugees from other American cities, including California, the upper midwest and the northeast. I'm from Kansas City originally and that is not unusual. Also, about a third of the metropolitan population of 4.1 million is from Latin America, most recent arrivals from Mexico. Over 40% of the city of Phoenix's population of over 1.4 million is hispanic. Spanish is the second language of the city, no doubt. Many neighborhoods, mostly on the south and western sides of the metro area are largely hispanic, with many carnicerias, mariscos, joyerias and llantera shops catering to that need. Needless to say, Mexican food is the number one cuisine of Phoenix, with many low and high-end restaurants to satisfy that need.

Because of irrigation and water supplies from the Colorado River (via the Central Arizona Project canal), the system of reservoirs and lakes in Arizona (mostly in the Salt River and Verde River watersheds) and groundwater pumping, Phoenix is an agreeably green and treed place. If you have not been here, forget everything you think you know about Phoenix. There's no sand and it is not 40 miles of kitty litter, as I used to think ignorantly when I lived in Kansas City. Even the true desert is far more lush and vibrant than most would ever image.

Here's a couple of pics:












Don't get me wrong - Phoenix has many issues, including water, dangers from wildfires, pollution, excessive sprawl, and not a very dynamic downtown. But it is far from a hellhole as many would be wont to paint it.

--don
 

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Phoenix is a great place for laid back people to live.

As for infrastructure, density, etc., I don't see it as a problem. Driving in air conditioned cars is quite understandable when it's 50 degrees (122F - I believe that was the high this past summer - hottest city I've heard save Dubai) outside. I've only been during springtime, and it was gorgeous.

The desert is wonderful hiking territory if you don't mind potential snakes. :p
 

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lauderdalegator said:
Nice pix. Phoenix's skyline is tiny for a city of over a million. It looks like a suburb of L.A. or SF. Why are the buildings so short? Is the airport too close to downtown or something? Very suburban.
For city in its location, I actually find it to be very big.
 

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Why do people move here?

Very Barren, very remote...its like these people were banished to the end of the earth.
 

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Why do people move here?

Very Barren, very remote...its like these people were banished to the end of the earth.
 

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It's funny how Phoenix likes to claim the grand canyon as its own. The Grand Canyon is nowhere near Phoenix. It's about a half days drive on the other end of the state, somewhere between Phoenix and Las Vegas.
 

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lauderdalegator said:
Nice pix. Phoenix's skyline is tiny for a city of over a million. It looks like a suburb of L.A. or SF. Why are the buildings so short? Is the airport too close to downtown or something? Very suburban.
My guess is that Phoenix is known for being a new-economy/service-economy type of city, as opposed to a an old industrial town like Cleveland or Philadelphia or even Houston whose corporations like to build monolithic office towers downtown. The new economy companies prefer squat suburban office parks instead of skyscrapers.
 
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