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Mosquée Sheikh Zayed, Abu Dhabi

La mosquée Sheikh Zayed est, avec sa superificie totale de 22 412 m² et sa capacité à accueillir jusqu'à 40 000 visiteurs, la plus grande mosquée des Émirats arabes unis, et la sixième au rang mondial. Son nom vient du Cheikh Zayed ben Sultan Al Nahyane, le premier président des Émirats arabes unis et commanditaire de l'édifice. C'est aussi la plus grande structure en marbre construite à ce jour par l'homme. Elle contient le plus grand lustre et le plus grand tapis au monde.

Sa construction s'est étendue de 1995 à 2007, soit 12 ans de travaux pour un coût total d'environ 2 milliards de dirhams (environ 400 millions d'euros) et est le fruit d'une collaboration d'ingénieurs et d'artisans internationaux, et de 2 500 ouvriers travaillant sur place sous 40 °C.
Sheikh Zayed Mosque - UAE by Daniel Nahabedian, on Flickr

Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque by Aamir Yunus, on Flickr

Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque by Aamir Yunus, on Flickr

Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque by Aamir Yunus, on Flickr

Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque by Aamir Yunus, on Flickr

Inside Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque! by Saad Al-Enezi, on Flickr
 

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Mosquée Jama Masjid, New Delhi, India

The Masjid-i Jahān-Numā commonly known as the Jama Masjid of Delhi, is one of the largest mosques in India.

It was built by Mughal emperor Shah Jahan between 1644 and 1656 at a cost of 1 million rupees, and was inaugurated by an imam from Bukhara, present-day Uzbekistan.

The mosque was completed in 1656 AD with three great gates, four towers and two 40 m high minarets constructed of strips of red sandstone and white marble. There are three domes on the terrace which are surrounded by the two minarets.

The architectural plan of Badshahi Masjid, built by Shah Jahan's son Aurangzeb at Lahore, Pakistan, is similar to the Jama Masjid.

The courtyard can accommodate more than 25,000 persons.
Jama Masjid, India by Srini Sundarrajan, on Flickr

Jama Masjid,Delhi, India by Gajendra Pal Choudhary, on Flickr
 

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Istanbul: Nuruosmaniye Mosque





The Nuruosmaniye Mosque is an 18th-century Ottoman mosque located in the Çemberlitaş neighbourhood of Fatih district in Istanbul, Turkey. In 2016 it was inscribed in the Tentative list of World Heritage Sites in Turkey. The dome of the mosque is extremely distinct, and the fourth largest in the city of Istanbul, behind the Hagia Sophia, Süleymaniye Mosque, and Fatih Mosque, respectively. The Nuruosmaniye mosque is part of a larger religious complex, or Külliye, acting as a centre of culture, religion, and education for the neighborhood. The first imperial mosque of Istanbul that integrated both Baroque and neoclassical elements in its construction, Nuruosmaniye Mosque was built in the Ottoman Baroque style. The mosque's muqarnas and its curved courtyard show the influence of the Baroque. The mosque is located on Istanbul's second hill, site of the mosque of Fatma Huton; that mosque was burned due to a fire. In Constantinople, the area of the Nurosmaniye Mosque was close to the Forum of Constantine, where the Column of Constantine still stands. Surrounding the mosque is Istanbul's Grand Bazaar. After the construction of the Sultan Ahmed Mosque, the Nurosmaniye mosque was the first imperial mosque to be built in 100 years.















































 

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Istanbul: Yeni Valide Mosque




Located in the Üsküdar district, in the Asian sector of Istanbul, the Yeni Valide Mosque was built in the 18th century. Commissioned by Sultan Ahmed III, it is recognized for being one of the first mosques to use the crushed dome.













































 

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Istanbul: Gazi Atik Ali Paşa Camii




The Gazi Atik Ali Pasha Mosque is a 15th-century Ottoman mosque located in the Çemberlitaş neighbourhood of the Fatih district in Istanbul, Turkey. Its construction was started under the orders of the future Grand Vizier Hadım Atik Ali Pasha in 1496 and was completed in 1497, during the reign of Sultan Bayezid II. The mosque is located near the entrance to the Kapalıçarşı (Grand Bazaar), the Column of Constantine, and the historical Nuruosmaniye Mosque.



























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Istanbul: Blue Mosque




The Blue Mosque is an Ottoman-era mosque located in Istanbul, Turkey. A functioning mosque, it also attracts large numbers of tourist visitors. It was constructed between 1609 and 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I. Its Külliye contains Ahmed's tomb, a madrasah and a hospice. Hand-painted blue tiles adorn the mosque’s interior walls, and at night the mosque is bathed in blue as lights frame the mosque’s five main domes, six minarets and eight secondary domes. It sits next to the Hagia Sophia, the principal mosque of Istanbul until the Blue Mosque's construction and another popular tourist site. After the Peace of Zsitvatorok and the crushing loss in the 1603–18 war with Persia, Sultan Ahmet I decided to build a large mosque in Istanbul to reassert Ottoman power. It would be the first imperial mosque for more than forty years. While his predecessors had paid for their mosques with the spoils of war, Ahmet I procured funds from the Treasury, because he had not gained remarkable victories. The construction was started in 1609 and completed in 1616. It caused the anger of the ulama, the Muslim jurists. The mosque was built on the site of the palace of the Byzantine emperors, in front of the basilica Hagia Sophia (at that time, the primary imperial mosque in Istanbul) and the hippodrome, a site of significant symbolic meaning as it dominated the city skyline from the south. Big parts of the south shore of the mosque rest on the foundations, the vaults of the old Grand Palace.





























































 
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