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I hope the cities aren't linked by unbroken development. Unbroken and excellent transport infrastructure, yes, but I really don't think we should be encouraging more sprawl (at least in terms of residential/commercial development).
 

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Discussion Starter · #262 · (Edited)
Brilliant piece about Dr. Coetzee, when travelling to Durban it struck me as well that it could be linked with PMB to form a single massive megalopolis or at least a corridor of unbroken development.

I do doubt this megacity will surpass Gauteng though, because Africa has a vast inland hinterland and GP is well-located to service and trade with this hinterland, especially via rail or road.
the question to be asked on that though is how vital in the future will south Africa be for African trade? More and more will go direct to those markets via direct ports serviced from mega ports. Durbans role is to be that transshipment hub servicing a vast and growing Africa. The same will happen on the west coast of Africa, Angola maybe.

The way goods get to out neighboring countries is unlikely to remain as it is decades I an therefore Gautengs role in that will be minimized.

I also see far more export orientated firms moving coastal.

And a final point.. KZN struggled the past 20years to grow at the rate of Gauteng mainly due to highly ineffective leadership, not from lack of potential. The right leadership and programs can and will change that as it is the province most strategically suited to the changing world around us.

And banks moving. That ain't happening. Joburg will remain with its financial focus, I can see cost of living there soaring much more than elsewhere due to surcharges they will likely need to pay on transport of goods, water fuel etc rising alot
 

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I envisage that indeed DBN will be the main conduit for imports and exports for Southern Africa, the value-add and services associated with the products will however be largely done in Gauteng IMO. So distribution of spare parts, installation, repairs and upgrading of machinery exported to SSA will be done in GP.

Plus most imports that come from Africa into RSA, come by road or rail, so things like copper from the Copperbelt, or DRC cobalt will be refined and beneficiated in Joburg rather than Durbs.

So, I'm not convinced that any of the coastal city will threaten GP's position, in fact the province has got critical mass and will continue to entrench itself, i.e. the contribution to GDP is ever rising and it might even hit 50% in about 20 yrs at the current trajectory.
 

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This is a genuine question Nostra,

Why would you have a Central DC in GP (for instance), when you are importing the product, or even exporting (as well as local distribution). It would just make sense to have the Central DC at the nearest shipping point, then if you're importing product, they come to one place and can then be distributed from there.. if you're exporting (and locally distributing) they same thing applies.. goes to one place, then any further shipment is a single transaction rather than multiple handoffs etc etc...
 

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SA's economy is 2/3 services. Of course the export of manufactured goods will continue to play an important role but this can be managed fairly easily through improvements to rail and transport infrastructure. Gauteng has massive economies of scale, and pretty much every single indicator shows that the importance of Gauteng is increasing. Specifically KZN is the province that has the biggest drop in % contribution to South Africa's GDP over the last 20 years. I don't see how you can realistically make the argument that KZN is going to become equal/more important economically than Gauteng when the exact opposite has been happening for the last two decades.
 

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I don't personally think the argument is specifically KZN, more that coastal cities will become more prominent and important, and that Gauteng will become a services centre, but the manufacturing, shipping and logistics centres will be coastal.

I also think a fair amount of the "services" that this country offers are heavily biased towards logistics and shipping of product.
 

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This is a genuine question Nostra,

Why would you have a Central DC in GP (for instance), when you are importing the product, or even exporting (as well as local distribution).
It would just make sense to have the Central DC at the nearest shipping point, then if you're importing product, they come to one place and can then be distributed from there.. if you're exporting (and locally distributing) they same thing applies.. goes to one place, then any further shipment is a single transaction rather than multiple handoffs etc etc...
Genuine answer: I'm no logistics expert, but my common sense tells me it would depend on the destination market size. There are plenty of urban centres around the GP area other than the very large GP market itself. It's not just GP, there's about 4 provincal capitals within 300km's of GP as well as 3 national capitals, i.e. Gaborone, Maputo, and further away Zim and Lusaka....


E.G. Pick and Pay and Shoprite are both Cape retailers, but their DC's in GP are larger than the ones they have in WC, simply because there is larger market up North.Yes, the maritime economy have always been more important hence all major economic centres are coastal, I put it to you (shout out to Barry Roux!) that with the advent of modern communications tech, barriers of entry and cost of business is tumbling. In future this will not matter as much, in fact the age of the inland city will be upon us.

Lastly GP still has a lot of things going for it from a structural POV. Relatively losts of energy and water, educational facilities and good population density. All these will ensure growth contines unabated, all things being equal
 

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I think the comparison between Gauteng and KZN is somewhat unfair. KZN is largely rural, with a majority of folks living on rural land, and not economically active. On the other hand, Gauteng is very urbanised with most people in one form of economic activity or another.

Industrialize the rural areas, and this will be a reality. I think KZN has lots of potential there. Maybe throw in a few more universities in some of those small towns to build more capacity.
 

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Genuine answer: I'm no logistics expert, but my common sense tells me it would depend on the destination market size. There are plenty of urban centres around the GP area other than the very large GP market itself. It's not just GP, there's about 4 provincal capitals within 300km's of GP as well as 3 national capitals, i.e. Gaborone, Maputo, and further away Zim and Lusaka....


E.G. Pick and Pay and Shoprite are both Cape retailers, but their DC's in GP are larger than the ones they have in WC, simply because there is larger market up North.Yes, the maritime economy have always been more important hence all major economic centres are coastal, I put it to you (shout out to Barry Roux!) that with the advent of modern communications tech, barriers of entry and cost of business is tumbling. In future this will not matter as much, in fact the age of the inland city will be upon us.

Lastly GP still has a lot of things going for it from a structural POV. Relatively losts of energy and water, educational facilities and good population density. All these will ensure growth contines unabated, all things being equal
Fair answer... :)

I would be thinking that in the long term, for imported product distributors, that they will have things like Central DC's feeding regional DC's.. and yes in some cases the Regional DC may be bigger in GP than in the coastal areas due to the market...

Also, in terms of modern communications, land locked cities are still at a disadvantage in some areas.. for any massively time sensitive type of international communication, you WANT to be in either Ysterfontein, or Mtunzini (so DBN or CPT) due to that 30 - 40ms time it takes for the data to get from GP to the undersea cables to go overseas...
 

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Maritzburg out to lure tourists

April 3 2014 at 08:54am
By Sharika Regchand

The KwaZulu-Natal legislature buildings in Pietermaritzburg. The endeavour to promote tourism and rebrand the city has seen the council injecting money into the annual Msunduzi Jazz Festival.

Durban - Tsogo Sun and the Msunduzi Municipality are to be partners in an effort to establish the Golden Horse Sprint as the premier racing event in the country, one up on the Vodacom Durban July and Cape Town’s J&B Met.

The endeavour to promote tourism and rebrand the city has seen the council injecting money into the annual Msunduzi Jazz Festival, which was inaugerated last year.

At an executive committee meeting on Wednesday, councillors listened to two presentations on how the events would benefit Pietermaritzburg.

The municipality decided to enter into a three-year partnership with Tsogo and Starlight Promotions – who hosted the jazz festival – which would see it invest more than R11m.

It would give Tsogo R4m this year and R2-million over the next two years. The festival would benefit from R1m this year, with the amount increasing in line with the consumer price index in subsequent years.

The DA’s Mergan Chetty opposed the decision. He said the money should be spent on housing and electricity.

“Money should be spent on lifting service… tourism has been crippled due to roads being riddled with potholes… tourism is on the decline because of poor infrastructure,” he said.

ANC councillor Jabu Ngubo disagreed, saying the partnerships would assist economic development.

Ray Ngcobo, the deputy municipal manager of economic development, emphasised the importance of tourism, saying: “We can’t deal with issues of poverty unless we jack up our economy.”

If one had to look at sectors driving the economy, tourism had overtaken gold as a contributor, Ngcobo said.

The city’s acting marketing manager, Madeline Plaatjies, said the Golden Horse Sprint was one of four major horse racing events in the country.

It was first run as the Gilbey’s Stakes in 1962. The belief was that it could become the premier race for speed, “where the fastest horses come to race”.

Plaatjies said the main focus of the partnership would be to establish the race as a brand, linked to the city.

The owners of the event wanted to shoot a campaign in Pietermaritzburg for television that would show recognisable buildings with horses running past. In the month of the flighting, the city would receive more than R7m worth of coverage. Reputable entertainers to be included in the building of the brand included kwaito star Zakes Bantwini, house band Micasa and well-known DJs.

Municipal manager Mxolisi Nkosi said three years would be sufficient to develop a brand that would attract big sponsors for the race. - The Mercury


http://www.iol.co.za/travel/south-a...g-out-to-lure-tourists-1.1670335#.Uz0QlYXQ5e4
 

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City development land audit languishes
27 May 2014
Nalini Naidoo

DEVELOPMENT in Msunduzi is being held up because a land and lease audit that was supposed to be completed more than a year ago, remains on councilメs outstanding task list.
Msunduziメs Executive Committee (Exco) has criticised officials for the lack of progress on this front. Chairperson of councilメs Economic Development and Planning Committee, Eunice Majola, said the situation was unacceptable.
The audit will give a tally of vacant land available in the city for development and details of council properties that are on lease, including those on 50 and 100 year leases. This will help council identify the most suitable sites for commercial, recreational and housing developments.
Mayor Chris Ndlela said it was like being the head of a family and not knowing how many children he had. モWe want to know what land is available as it will open doors for development and the officials are being pressurised because we want our people to get jobs and for our rates base to increase,ヤ he said.
Councillor Bill Lambert said it was time Pietermaritzburg saw more cranes in the sky. モThis land audit is of vital importance and the success of this administration will depend on what Dr Ray Ngcobo and his team at Economic Development deliver on this.ヤ
Lambert thanked Majola for raising the issue and said as head of the economic development portfolio committee she experienced first hand the difficulty of getting development moving in the city.
A case in point is the Scottsville Bowling Club, which has become an overgrown haven for vagrants and a city eyesore. In a Witness article in August 2013, then Msunduzi municipality spokesperson Brian Zuma said the delay in developing the property was because council was carrying out a land audit. Nine months since that article was written, the land audit is still outstanding.
Municipal manager Mxolisi Nkosi assured Exco members that he will be putting pressure on officials to ensure that the audit does materialise.
 

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Msunduzi to get involved in running of airport
13 Jun 2014
Nalini Naidoo

THE Msunduzi Municipality is looking at creating a municipal entity to run the Pietermaritzburg Airport.
Currently the airport is outsourced to Indiza, which also manages the Richards Bay and Virginia airports.
Municipal manager Mxolisi Nkosi said at present they have little influence over the growth and expansion of the airport.
The municipality, which has conducted a feasibility study, wants to be more creative and look at broadening the services offered by the airport and inviting other airlines to fly to and from here.
Nkosi said the move could result in jobs being created.
He said a CEO would be appointed to run the airport, whose work would be overseen by a board of members with skills in the aviation, financial and related fields. The CEO would also be tasked with ensuring the airport’s growth and development.
The executive committee gave Nkosi permission to proceed with legislative procedures to set up the entity.
Pietermaritzburg Chamber of Business CEO Melanie Veness said she would be better placed to comment after examining the results of the feasibility study. However, she said that running an airport is not a core function of a municipality.
 

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The airport has been doing very well for the last few years under private management. It's one of the few things in the city that is well run. Something fishy.
 

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Plans to develop Hesketh back on track
30 Jun 2014
Alwyn Viljoen

IN the next two years, by 2016, Mike Fogg, MD of the Hesketh Motor Club and Country Estate, hopes to see the long-held dream of a “suburb for petrol heads” realised with the development of the historic Hesketh race track in Hayfields, Pietermaritzburg.
Fogg, a former champion motorcycle racer and pioneer of vehicle maintenance leases in South Africa, yesterday told The Witness the development plans, which had first been touted “just in time for the world recession” in 2008, were now firmly back on track. “The economy has recovered significantly,” said Fogg, adding the time was now ripe to create a venue where vehicles could be not just showed, but experienced.
“We feel it is time to start selling vehicles differently, not just showing a car, but selling the lifestyle of the car in a setting for which it was designed,” he said.
Fogg said the Hesketh track has recently seen R300 000 spent on it to fix cracks and built a clubhouse, but the next phase aimed to establish a motoring venue with a skidpan, a 4x4 track, display areas, a museum, and plots for private homes overlooking the track. These will sell from R3 million.
Fogg said there will still not be any racing at the Hesketh track, as he had promised the council when he bought the track. “We have a 96 decibel limit, which is as loud as a motorbike at full bore. We strictly monitor all events and have in the past ten years only had to remove three vehicles for being too loud.”
However, one day a year the track can host an event with no sound restrictions, and Fogg says he hopes to use this day to create in KZN a national event similar to the UK’s famous Goodwood Festival of Speed. “We will call our’s a Festival of Wheels,” Fogg said.
 

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City takes a bold stand
01 Jul 2014
Nalini Naidoo

MSUNDUZI Municipality ditched its sackcloth-and-ashes image yesterday as Mayor Chris Ndlela promised citizens the city was “shedding its small town mentality”.
At a bold, first-ever State of the City Address, guests walked down a red carpet in the Royal Showgrounds into a specially decorated Olympia Hall replete with flowers, drapes and covered chairs.
Ndlela made no apology for the pomp. He said the municipality, which had once stared bankruptcy in the face, was back on its feet, financially stable and had savings in the bank.
He said the capital of KwaZulu-Natal needed to make this known “to show that it was shedding its small town mentality and was ready to work on its aspirations to become a world-class or a first-world city”.
Among the highlights in his speech, he spoke of:
• A fraud and corruption hotline being launched;
• Massive electrification projects;
• R250 million spending on infrastructure maintenance, and;
• A drive to clean up the city.
But he also listed traffic gridlocks, illegal electricity connections, cable theft and non-payment for services as among Msunduzi’s continuing challenges.
Ndlela said a key priority was never to return to the “murky waters”, of 2008 when the municipality went under administration.
“We have to ensure that there are systems in place to counter irregularities,” he said, announcing that the municipality had engaged a reputable, and independent company to run a fraud and corruption whistleblowing hotline.
Ndlela said the hotline will be launched shortly with contact numbers and would reveal statistics on cases investigated in the last three years, including criminal cases with the South African police.
He highlighted electrification projects in the city, where several informal settlements are set to have electricity by the end of this year, with others like Peace Valley to be completed the following year.
The municipality was also in negotiations with Eskom to provide electricity to the vast Vulindlela area.
Similarly the Vulindlela Water Scheme, which was negotiating with Umgeni Water to improve the maintenance of the scheme, has been transferred to the municipality.
The mayor noted that this was the first budget where the municipality had set aside a quarter of a billion rand for repairs and maintenance.
He noted that a city that did not maintain its infrastructure would have a hard time attracting investors.
He said work was also being done to attract investors to the city.
“Watch this space,” Ndlela said as he announced that the R1,6 billion Camps Drift Waterfront development was back on track as well as the Midlands Mall *expansion.
He said Pietermaritzburg needed to be clean and tidy to become a world-class city.
He called on residents to see the city as their own and play their part in keeping it clean.
Ndlela said Mandela Day this year would be used to launch a drive to clean the city.
He said illegal electricity connections and copper theft were posing huge problems for the municipality. Ndlela said if the municipality was going to deliver services to communities across the city efficiently, they needed to address illegal connections, non-payment for services, meter tampering and the shortage of skilled staff in the municipality.
After his speech, the mayor told The Witness there would always be cynics who believed nothing good happened in Msunduzi.
“There is a jaundiced approach that does not do justice to the full spectrum that is Msunduzi Municipality, but only focuses on the CBD and the urban areas.”
He said if people looked at the entire municipal area they would appreciate how difficult is was to prepare a budget that dealt with the needs and expectations of the entire population.
He believed it could be done, he said.
Just as Pietermaritzburg came together to win back its capital status, he believed the city could come together to work towards a shared vision to become a world-class city.
 

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Progress in BRT plan
29 Jul 2014
Nalini Naidoo

TALK about introducing Bus Rapid Transport (BRT) System turned to action in the Msunduzi Municipality yesterday.
The BRT proposal will be subjected to an environmental impact assessment (EIA) on the overall project as the first phase of the project.
This will not only assess the positive and negative impact on the surrounding areas, but also on the residents. The process allows for the public to voice objections and make recommendations.
EIA public meetings will be held tomorrow and Thursday in the two areas that will hold the terminal stations of the main bus route.
Tomorrow’s meeting will be at Georgetown Hall in Edendale and Thursday’s will be at Northdale Civic Centre. Both meetings will start at 5.30 pm.
The design team, traffic engineers, socio-economic and environmental specialists as well as the Msunduzi Project Management Unit will be present to answer questions.
Msunduzi team member Nomonde Gwabeni said the dedicated bus lanes system was aimed at increasing public transportation use and reducing traffic congestion.
It is part of a long-term plan to have an Integrated Rapid Public Transport Network (IRPTN) in Pietermaritzburg.
The aim of the IRPTN in turn is to integrate existing modes of transport to improve and simplify commuter trips.
Gwabeni said according to the preliminary planning, the BRT system will comprise a 17,3-km long main bus corridor between Edendale, through the Msunduzi CBD via Church Street, to Raisethorpe. There will be 15 proposed intermediate stations located between two terminal stations, the first of which will be in Georgetown, the other in Raisethorpe. There is speculation so far that the Raisethorpe terminal will be on vacant land at the corner of Khan and Chota Motala roads — the site of the old Baijoo and Maharaj School.
Gwabeni said there will be a turnaround facility 14,7 km from the first station north-east of the N3 crossing.
“This BRT system in Msunduzi will be complemented by nine depot sites that will be located in the city of Msunduzi and surrounds.
This as well as a state-of-the-art control centre for the system called a Transportation Hub, where the system will be controlled, and which will be located in the CBD,” she said. The proposed rollout of the initiative is divided into four phases spanning over five years. The construction of the trunk (Right-Of-Way) within the CBD is targeted for early 2017.
There was an outcry at initial presentations over a proposal that the whole of Church Street be closed to cars to free up the street for pedestrians and the bus systems. Residents will get clarity on this aspect of the plan at the public meetings this week.
 

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Village for KZN MPLs now on agenda

August 27 2014 at 12:02pm
By Bongani Hans

Durban - The KwaZulu-Natal legislature is under mounting pressure to explore the idea of a “parliamentary village” to cut the costs of accommodating MPLs in Pietermaritzburg hotels.


Currently MPLs check into hotels every time they are at the legislature for more than a day.

The Golden Horse Hotel, which the legislature often uses, has a standard rate of R1 500 per person per night during the week. The province has more than 80 MPLs, but only those living more than 200km from the city are allowed to stay in hotels at the legislature’s expense.

Legislature spokesman Leon Mbangwa could not say how many MPLs qualified for accommodation.

He said the legislature was considering incorporating a village in the new legislature expected to be built.

“The decision to accommodate MPLs in hotels is due to the fact that the KZN legislature, unlike other legislatures and Parliament, does not have a parliamentary village,” said Mbangwa.

However, Mbangwa said hotel accommodation could be cheaper than the proposed government village in the long run. There were strict measures to control expenditure; the government did not pay for alcohol, and breakfast was limited to R120 and dinner to R220.

“Using hotels and B&Bs is actually cost-effective as the legislature is not responsible for maintenance and rates. It also does not have to employ extra personnel for maintenance,” he said.

Recently, provincial Speaker Lydia Johnson said R6 million had been set aside for a feasibility study into the construction of a new legislature building.

Another legislature spokesman, Wonder Hlongwa, said the study would give direction on whether accommodation could be included.

“The study would look at many things, including costs, and whether the new legislature should be like the one in Ulundi,” said Hlongwa.

The Ulundi legislature building has luxury homes for MECs and MPLs and blocks of flats for administration staff.

National Freedom Party MPL Happy Khuzwayo said the hotel accommodation had led to the legislature overspending by R1.4m in the last financial year. She called on the Department of Public Works to at least buy a block of flats to accommodate MPLs.


“This month we lived at Golden Horse between August 5 and August 7 for general debate. We returned again between August 11 and August 16 and between August 18 and 20,” she said.

IFP MPL Imran Keeka said in a village, the government would not have to provide meals, as MPLs could cook for themselves.


“My view is that accommodation in the form of a block of flats should be provided,” he said.
 

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R400 million highway project to expand lanes gets the green light
29 Oct 2014
Khanyisani Dlomo

A MULTI-MILLION rand upgrade of the N3 toll highway between the Cedara interchange and Howick in the Midlands is set to get under way early next year.
The R400 million project, authorised by the department of Environmental Affairs this month, will see the highway being upgraded from the current four-lane dual carriageway to a six-lane dual carriageway over a period of two years.
This is South African Road Agency Limited’s (Sanral) plan to improve road safety and ease congestion by widening the highway there.
According to Environmental Affairs, the road widening will take place inside the median. The existing road will be widened by more than six metres over approximately 14 kilometres.
Where the road is constructed within five kilometres of the Midmar protected area, there will be no impact emanating from the project.
Sanral’s Ravi Ronny said N3 Toll Concession (N3TC) will fund the expansion works at an estimated value of R400 million.
“There will be no e-toll or toll gantries on this section as this section of the N3 is already part of a declared toll road currently operated by the N3TC.”
He said all construction work, including maintenance, is funded by the N3TC from toll fees collected at their current toll plazas. He added that there have been no objections and an environmental authorisation process, which included public participation, has been completed.
The contractor will be appointed next year.
Although the development runs through five wards in the area, Environmental Affairs communications chief director Albi Modise said no households will be affected.
“There will be no additional land required and no one will be relocated. During the environmental authorisation process, residents of the surrounding areas will not be harmed,” said Modise.
 
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