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What cities call their central business districts something other than "Downtown"? Downtown seems to be so common and so synonymous with the central business district that people tend to overlook that it means "down at the south part of town" or likewise.

I know some places call their central business districts "the Financial District". Toronto is one city that does this for their skyscraper area.

Philadelphia calls the CBD "Center City". It seems to indicate that it's more in the middle, not at the lower end of the city (like New York City's Downtown is).

My city, being close to Philadelphia, also calls it's CBD "Center City" like Philly. Unlike Philly, however, it also gets called "Downtown" plenty of times.
 

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I think you'll find that only North American cities call their CBD downtown. The rest of the world calls it the CBD or city centre. In Australia it's the CBD.
 

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I think you'll find that only North American cities call their CBD downtown. The rest of the world calls it the CBD or city centre. In Australia it's the CBD.
Not all. San Francisco for example calls it Financial District. Another case is New York. There are two major CBDs in Manhattan, Financial District (downtown) and Midtown.

In some cities, CBDs lie outside the city centre such as La Defense in Paris.
 

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Midtown Manhattan is pretty much the NYC's CBD of the 21st century.
 

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It's not Cheung Wan, but Jung Wan, which roughly means 'central place'
When I look at it, there is really no perfect translation of romanizing Chinese names or terms. Just like in Kung Fu, there's Kung Fu or Gung Fu. Or Wing Tsun, Wing Chun or Ving Tsun. Or Nanking, Nanjing

In some maps, it's spelled Cheung Wan instead of Jung Wan.
 

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When I look at it, there is really no perfect translation of romanizing Chinese names. Just like in Kung Fu, there's Kung Fu or Gung Fu. Or Wing Tsun, Wing Chun or Ving Tsun.

In some maps, it's spelled Cheung Wan instead of Jung Wan.
For Mandarin names, there is an official translation that is now used throughout the world which is called Hanyu Pinyin. For Cantonese names, it is more subjective, but if you know Cantonese, 'cheung' is not the same as 'jung' as in Central. The first word in the name Cheung Kong Center is not the same as the first word in the name Central. The closest pronounciation is to 'jung', so your source is wrong.
 

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For Mandarin names, there is an official translation that is now used throughout the world which is called Hanyu Pinyin. For Cantonese names, it is more subjective, but if you know Cantonese, 'cheung' is not the same as 'jung' as in Central. The first word in the name Cheung Kong Center is not the same as the first word in the name Central. The closest pronounciation is to 'jung', so your source is wrong.
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2004-06/30/content_344262.htm

Here's a page where Central is pronounced Chung Wan. Anyway, that's all. One thing, HK doesn't call its CBD downtown. In fact another name for Central is Victoria which is seldom used today.
 

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http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2004-06/30/content_344262.htm

Here's a page where Central is pronounced Chung Wan. Anyway, that's all. One thing, HK doesn't call its CBD downtown. In fact another name for Central is Victoria which is seldom used today.
In most maps and tourist reference material, 'Central' is used and not the Chinese name. Hence I wouldn't place too much reliance in what you find as the English name of Central's Chinese name. Victoria is not used by the locals even during the colonial era despite the fact that it is listed in maps. The name Victoria does not only include Central. It actually goes west into Sheung Wan. If you walk one of the trails that go from the Peak towards HKU, there is actually a marker on the trail that shows Victoria's boundary.

A lot of Chinese cities don't use the word 'downtown'. Shanghai uses Puxi (west of the river) and Pudong (east of the river). Guangzhou's new financial district is called Tianhe, while Shenzhen's new business district is called Futian.

Seoul, however, calls its historic business district Chung-gu, which roughly means the same as 'Central'. However, there is another business district on the south side of the Han River, which they call Gang-nam, which means 'south of the river'.
 

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In Sydney, it's the "city" to most people.

In Osaka, it's just Umeda or Namba.
 

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In Australia i've found if people are planning on going to the CBD they'll usually say:

"I'm going to the city" or "I'm going into town".
 

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Although the historic city centre for London is 'The City', some attention has shifted to Canary Wharf. When I was living in New York, the commute inbound would constitute going 'into the city'.
 
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