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Investors Eye Accra Plains
Friday, 22 October 2010 15:24

The Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA) has so far received several notices of interest from investors willing to partner government to irrigate the Accra Plains.





This follows the completion of the US$20million Kuwaiti Fund earmarked to conduct feasibility studies on the 156,000 hectare Accra Plains in JuneMr. Daniel Lamptey, Chief Executive Officer of the Irrigation Development Authority (IDA), disclosed this to B&FT on Wednesday.
He said the Tunisian company contracted to undertake the feasibility study has presented the final report to the Minister of Food and Agriculture, and since then a number of investors have expressed interest.


“So far, two groups of Chinese investors have expressed their interest and an Indian group is negotiating with the Ministry while the consulting firm, Studi, has found a partner to develop the first 500,000 hectares on a build, operate and transfer basis (BOT).”
According to Mr. Lamptey, MOFA wants to organise the investors to partner government to operate the project on a public, private, partnership (ppp) basis, so that the investor can produce as the main producer and the out-growers would be the peasant farmers within the catchment area - who would then have the benefit of imbibing new technologies in irrigation.


Mr. Lamptey was hopeful that by next year some form of construction would start on the 5,000 hectares earmarked under the feasibility study. Each investor is to go by the terms prescribed in the feasibility report.


Mr. Lamptey indicated that the investor will install lift-pumps to lift water from the Volta River and push it through the pipes to a storage device that will then channel the water to canals which will redistribute the water around the 5,000 hectare plain.
http://www.proghana.com/index.php/201010225190/Business/investors-eye-accra-plains

A perusal of the final report of the study under the Executive summary indicates that the bulk of the irrigated scheme will go to private developers (agribusiness) who will support the bulk of production investments (investment in plot and development) and post-harvest( storage, packaging, processing and marketing).


“Government intervention is limited to structural investments necessary for the installation of private developers.” The total cost of developing the 5,000 hectares is estimated at US$100million and the area has been set aside for rice cultivation and vegetables.”

By Konrad Kodjo Djaisi
 

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This is one of the bets projects i've heard in Africa all year. That is IF it happens.

For those who dont know Ghana, Accra is situated on a coastal dry zone which starts in Ghana and extends into Benin. The soil is flat, fertile but rainfall erratic.

The Akosombo dam built in the 60s was supposed to irrigate the land surrounding Accra but it never happened. Instead, the water from the dam goes through Accra and gets dumped into the Atlantic ocean. Now the project may become a reality.

This would represent one of the largest agriculture projects ever undertaken in SSA.
Even if half of the 150,000 hectares was developed it would still be an important project.

This will be VERY attractive to investors because they have a ready market of 2-3 million people right there in Accra city so transport costs will be kept to a minimum.
 

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Investors Eye Accra Plains
Friday, 22 October 2010 15:24

The Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA) has so far received several notices of interest from investors willing to partner government to irrigate the Accra Plains.


“So far, two groups of Chinese investors have expressed their interest and an Indian group is negotiating with the Ministry while the consulting firm, Studi, has found a partner to develop the first 500,000 hectares on a build, operate and transfer basis (BOT).”
I think thats supposed to be 5000 hectares
 

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The Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MOFA) has so far received several notices of interest from investors willing to partner government to irrigate the Accra Plains.

his follows the completion of the US$20million Kuwaiti Fund earmarked to conduct feasibility studies on the 156,000 hectare Accra Plains in JuneMr. Daniel Lamptey, Chief Executive Officer of the Irrigation Development Authority (IDA), disclosed this to B&FT on Wednesday.
He said the Tunisian company contracted to undertake the feasibility study has presented the final report to the Minister of Food and Agriculture, and since then a number of investors have expressed interest.

“So far, two groups of Chinese investors have expressed their interest and an Indian group is negotiating with the Ministry while the consulting firm, Studi, has found a partner to develop the first 500,000 hectares on a build, operate and transfer basis (BOT).”
According to Mr. Lamptey, MOFA wants to organise the investors to partner government to operate the project on a public, private, partnership (ppp) basis, so that the investor can produce as the main producer and the out-growers would be the peasant farmers within the catchment area - who would then have the benefit of imbibing new technologies in irrigation.

Mr. Lamptey was hopeful that by next year some form of construction would start on the 5,000 hectares earmarked under the feasibility study. Each investor is to go by the terms prescribed in the feasibility report.


Mr. Lamptey indicated that the investor will install lift-pumps to lift water from the Volta River and push it through the pipes to a storage device that will then channel the water to canals which will redistribute the water around the 5,000 hectare plain.

A perusal of the final report of the study under the Executive summary indicates that the bulk of the irrigated scheme will go to private developers (agribusiness) who will support the bulk of production investments (investment in plot and development) and post-harvest( storage, packaging, processing and marketing).


Government intervention is limited to structural investments necessary for the installation of private developers.” The total cost of developing the 5,000 hectares is estimated at US$100million and the area has been set aside for rice cultivation and vegetables.”

By Konrad Kodjo Djaisi
 

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I checked and they plan to complete the whole project by 2017. Thats what I like about agriculture- it can be undertaken relatively quickly and the results are fast.
 

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This is really encouraging, but I can't believe the water was/is being dumped in the Ocean :bash:. How stupid!!!

Any idea as to how many farmers are to benefit from this?
 

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This is really encouraging, but I can't believe the water was/is being dumped in the Ocean :bash:. How stupid!!!

Any idea as to how many farmers are to benefit from this?
Yeah, well its Africa, could you expect common sense? The whole plan from the beginning in the 60s was to construct farms around Accra to be irrigated. But Nkrumah was to busy trying to turn Ghana into a Soviet style industrial nation so he ignored agriculture.

One problem that will arise however is that the river normally dumps silt into the sea, without this, erosion is bound to increase.

I dont think they know how many farmers. This study cant have been THAT detailed as it was only $1.4 million. The pilot scheme will be 5000 hectares (so 12500 acres). I think this will be commercial farming only but the full plan, once expanded, will also involve an outgrower scheme for local farmers.

What makes this so exciting is its proximity to Accra. Its in greater Accra state so even the furthest farm will only be 2-3 hours away by road (its a good network in the capital). One problem with earlier schemes is that they've been in distant areas. The Afram plains further North has also been earmarked by experts as a potential breadbasket but the roads in this region are abysmal so it would take $$$$ to get it up to an acceptable standard.
 
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