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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.miamidade.gov/parks_foundation/million-trees.asp


I know this is a forum about skyscraper, but trees are as just important to go with the landscaping of projects being built.

Miami wants to attain a 30% canopy by the year 2020, this started in 2011 and has 3 corporate sponsors. If everyone could just plant 1 tree in there yard this would be a help also.
 

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YES,YES,YES. As a person who takes transit and walks a lot, it sucks so much how almost all the sidewalks have 0 coverage from trees in our hot environment. The difference walking under a tree makes is huge, and please no Palm Trees.
 

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Yeah, I'm so tired of the shadeless palm tree being the cheap go-to tree for most landscaping in South Florida. I get its a native tree but damnit there's other natives that are beautiful and actually offer shade.
 

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There will be a lot of tree planting in Miami after November....:nuts:
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You can almost bet where you see a canal, lake or lagoon, there was more than likely an Australian Pine Tree, they are no longer planted as they are considered invasive and they are water hogs and also for the fact they topple over easy in a hurricane. So it would be nice to see something else grow there where there couldn't be in the past.
 

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We planted three trees last year, 2 on the swale and one in our back yard. A Jacaranda and a Royal Poinciana on the swale and another Royal Poinciana towards the rear of our property. They are close to 7 -8 feet in height. Supposedly the Jacaranda should start blooming in 2 years, beautiful purple flowers.
 

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Yeah, I'm so tired of the shadeless palm tree being the cheap go-to tree for most landscaping in South Florida. I get its a native tree but damnit there's other natives that are beautiful and actually offer shade.
Screw native. Who said it had to be native... only those stuck up, way to idealistic, leftists. We should plant whatever is beautiful and shady, native or not. Banyans offer lots of shade, Poincianas, Mossy oaks, Gumbo Limbo.
 

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Lol the trees you rattled off are all natives.
 
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This sounds wonderful, but haven't similar programs in other cities vastly under-delivered ?
Good question and offhand I don't know the answer to that. I do know the program is hardly unique to Miami and has been ongoing in multiple cities.

It's obviously a great idea and Miami DOES need significantly more shade tree canopy in many areas than what is currently there, in my opinion. It just makes your immediate environment so much more pleasant and inviting. In fact, it was a decisive factor in moving from my old neighborhood here in Philly which had a notable lack of canopy to the one I'm currently in which is very leafy.

But you bring up an interesting question as to how effective the program has been.
 

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By the way, on the subject of palm trees the overwhelming majority of those you see in South Florida---including coconut palms---are not native to the region at all and were imported over the years from a variety of places around the world, including many from Southeast Asia.

This FIU study goes into more detail (for anyone like me who is geeky enough to be interested) :cheers:

http://biology.fiu.edu/news/2011/experts-analyze-florida-palm-trees/
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
By the way, on the subject of palm trees the overwhelming majority of those you see in South Florida---including coconut palms---are not native to the region at all and were imported over the years from a variety of places around the world, including many from Southeast Asia.

This FIU study goes into more detail (for anyone like me who is geeky enough to be interested) :cheers:

http://biology.fiu.edu/news/2011/experts-analyze-florida-palm-trees/
Not native is as much the problem but invasive is as if one can see what an Australian Pine does, one gets a better understanding, not only are they invasive but a water hog.
 

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I felt like chiming in, coming from the Tampa Bay area, and am surprised to see this as I'm jealous of your trees. Maybe you guys are sick of the Royal Palm, but in the Tampa Bay area, I think we need alot more of them. I have slowly seen a few planted in the interior, but besides certain neighborhoods in Pinellas, they are nonexistent, and the palms we have here for the majority look old, raggedy, and like they just suffered from a hurricane. Our landscaping crews plant pine trees in our new completed expressway construction areas such as by the airport, and I believe that is a complete sin. Besides for queen palms and a bunch of non identifiable palms, all I see here is oaks, pines, and cypresses which I think fails to remind the residents they are near the beautiful water and are in Florida. I guess our problem isn't so bad, especially from my yard having over a dozen oak tress lol
 

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I guess the grass is always greener on the other side! I love the mixture of trees around Tampa. I also like the Live Oaks around Ocala and Gainesville.
 
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