SkyscraperCity Forum banner
1 - 20 of 61 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
18,164 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Italians once looked down on Spain as a poor country cousin. Now the roles are revers
March 7 issue - Touchy, touchy. How to rile Italians these days? Suggest they're losing ground to Spain in the European power sweepstakes. Jacques Chirac made this mistake a couple of weeks ago when he implied that Italy had lost its standing as a locomotive driving Europe into the 21st century. "Unfortunately, Italy is seceding from the nucleus that guides Europe," the French president reportedly told the former head of the European Commission, Romano Prodi—adding that Spain has taken its place. Ouch.

Italian hackles were raised in January as well, when European leaders gathered in Toulouse, France, to unveil the new pride of European aviation, the Airbus A380—the world's biggest passenger plane. All the major backers of the 10 billion euro project were there: Gerhard Schröder of Germany, Chirac of France, Tony Blair of Britain, Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero of Spain. Where was Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi of Italy? Never mind that Italy contributed only 4 percent to the A380's development. The perceived snub in Toulouse, scolded the Corriere della Sera in Milan, was "material evidence" that Spain has blazed past Italy to join the Big Three on Europe's center stage.

Chirac and the editors of Corriere are hardly alone. According to a recent survey presented at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Italians are more pessimistic about their future than citizens in any other country surveyed. Not only has Italy lost its way, they believe, but—worse—it has lost out to its Mediterranean rival, Spain. While Italy has stagnated over the past decade, Spain has boomed. It has created 4.5 million new jobs, more than twice the number in more populous Italy, and is growing at twice the European average. Poverty, declining in Spain, has risen in Italy, while iconic industries such as auto manufacturing and filmmaking have stumbled. Even ladolcevita isn't as sweet as it used to be. "Instead of looking toward the future, Italy looks toward the past, complaining," says Alber—to Marini, a thirtysomething screenwriter who left Italy to work in Barcelona.

Spain's stellar progress has made Italy's failings feel all the more embarrassing, to the point where Italian journalists have been elevating otherwise random setbacks into something approaching a national identity crisis. Zaragoza beats out Italy's Trieste for the right to host World Expo 2008. Valencia wins the race against Naples to hold the America's Cup in 2007. Such slights are fueling a massive inferiority complex, Italian style. "We used to look at Spaniards as our poor cousins," says Maurizio Belpietro, the editor of Il Giornale of Milan. "Now we see that it's not like that anymore." Or listen to Italian architect Alessandro Scarnato, who spends much of his time in Barcelona: "We imagine them taking siestas. Then we get here and see all they are doing. They're Latin, but they have something that we don't."

The Italians have a name for that something: dinamismo. Call it zest, pizzazz or sheer civic exuberance. Whatever, Spain has it—and the contrast couldn't be more glaring. A visitor to Rome needn't be conversant in the latest economic data to feel Italy's pain. Tourists see splendid monuments to past greatness, the flagship stores of great fashion houses, cafes filled with elegant Romans sipping their cappuccinos or aperitivo. But those same Romans are in a funk. Their purchasing power slipped when the Italian lira made way for the euro in 2002, and their salaries, many of them now frozen, haven't come close to catching up. Rome's inadequate public-transportation system may do wonders for the moto business, but it's a source of embarrassment to Romans riding Madrid's 12-line Metro network. Mafia wars rage anew in Naples. "I know many Italians in Madrid and Barcelona, and when their companies told them to go back home, they quit and looked for other jobs," says Giacomo Bonora, 35, an Italian banker in Barcelona.

It wasn't that long ago that those roles were reversed. Postwar Italy was Spain's rich cousin, transforming itself from a relatively underdeveloped, largely agricultural country into a modern industrial economy. It was a founding member in 1958 of what has become the European Union and quickly managed to be, as a former U.S. ambassador to Rome quipped in 1981, "a poor country full of rich people." Spain didn't become a modern democratic state until a generation ago, after nearly four decades under Francisco Franco, and wasn't allowed into the EU until 1986.

Since then, Spain has been rejuvenated and energized by a social and economic transformation—not to mention handsome stipends from the EU, which still amount to about 1 percent of the country's GDP—even as Italy has slipped. Ten years ago, Italy's share of world exports was 4.5 percent. By 2003 that had dropped to 3.3 percent. Italy may be bigger than Spain (58 million citizens compared with 40 million) and boast a bigger economy (per capita GDP is on a par with France's and Britain's), but it lags in economic growth. Compared with much of Europe, which has retooled itself to partake in the IT revolution, Italy seems stuck in a time warp, held back by (among other things) an insufficiently well-educated work force: according to a 2002 European Commission report, only 10 percent of Italians ages 25 to 64 had post-secondary-school degrees, compared with 23 percent in Germany, France and Spain.

Even the cachet of a MADE IN ITALY fashion label has faded. Italy used to address export difficulties by devaluing the lira. Now, as the euro strengthens against the dollar, a growing number of brands and fabric mills are choosing to produce their goods more cheaply outside Italy. (This happened long ago in the Italian olive-oil industry. Most Italian-labeled olive oil is—you guessed it—Spanish.) More basically, some Italian clothing firms simply haven't shown the savvy of their Spanish competitors. Madrid-listed Inditex—which includes the Zara chain and boasts of opening a store a day around the world—recently posted a 39 percent rise in net profits. The Italian equivalent, the Benetton Group, has moved into more-protected sectors such as motorways and telecoms, and is rumored to be considering selling off its clothing division, whose profits are dwarfed by Zara's.

The banking and telecom industries expose Italian weaknesses and Spanish strengths. Language has been a huge advantage for Spain, which has used its linguistic connections to mount an economic reconquista of the Americas, including the United States and Latin America. Partly because of this, Banco Santander Central Hispano and BBVA are now among Europe's largest. Among telecoms, Spain's Telefonica has also became a European behemoth.

Italy has a more glorious cinema history. But that's the problem: it's history. Again, the prevalence of Spanish speakers—400 million worldwide—helps to explain Spain's success. Italy last won an Oscar in 1998 for Roberto Benigni's "Life Is Beautiful." Since then, Spain has won two, and the Spanish director Alejandro Amenabar's "The Sea Inside" was a nominee for another one this year. Italian film receipts were twice Spain's a decade ago; Spain recently moved ahead. It is becoming rare for Italian films to play in Spanish cinemas. Yet even a remarkably grim film, Pedro Almodovar's "Bad Education," which details the adult impact of child sexual abuse by a clergyman, was one of the year's biggest moneymakers in Italy. Receiving Italy's foreign-film award, the Cinta di Oro, Almodovar commented that Italy is "more generous" to his films than his homeland. That might be due in part to the uninspired quality of Italy's own films. Italian cinema, says screenwriter Marini, "keeps making comedies with the same actors, reproducing the same things and pretending they are new."

Politics, anyone? Spain has, by and large, been a model of political stability and good governance. Italy, by contrast, is the perennial joke. Its traditional of revolving-door governments has given way to something widely regarded as even worse. Abroad, three and a half years of opera buffa under Silvio Berlusconi has eroded Italy's standing with its neighbors. At home, popular confidence in government has eroded.

Italy's day in the sun may come again. History moves in cycles, after all. Still, it's hard to escape the feeling that Italy has slipped irretrievably into Spain's shadow. As if to make the point, Real Madrid beat Turin's Juventus in last week's Champions League football matchup. And while Italy's Parliament dithers over a badly needed economic-stimulus package, the Spanish are considering abolishing their lengthy traditional afternoon lunch break, the siesta, in order to maximize workday productivity. Now there's a sign of the times.

With Mike Elkin in Madrid and Benedict Caparoso in London

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7037095/site/newsweek/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Pues yo no lo veo exagerado no es que España haya pasado en todo pero ha crecido notablemente y lo peor para Italia es que ha bajado, hace varios años que los indices economicos españoles son los mejores en Europa e incluso los grandes (vease Francia) miran con recelo, Italia hace 15-20 años estaba en todos los sitios en Europa, como nos ibamos a imaginar de otra forma la situacion con el airbus donde Italia no participa. Creo que Italia tiene una división muy importante entre el norte y el sur, que les ha hecho mucho daño. No olvidemos que hablamos de un país que era lanza de Europa en los 70 y 80, y que tiene mas de 15 millones más en población que España.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
827 Posts
Yo la verdad es que estuve el año pasado en Florencia, Milán, Venecia y Siena y al volver a España lo primero que pensé es "vuelvo a la civilización", por exagerado que parezca. Flipé de lo desordenado, del caos y de la suciedad en general de las ciudades. A mi sí me dio la impresión de ser un país más pobre que España, por lo menos esto es lo que se palpa en las calles. Y encima dicen que el sur es aún peor. Esto no quita no obstante, que menos Milán, las ciudades que visité me encantaran.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,465 Posts
El articulo es exagerado, pero los italianos tienen un serio problema de mentalidad en lo que se refiere a dinamismo economico. Y digo esto despues de haber vivido 5 meses en Italia y tener magnificos amigos y amigas alli.

De todas formas yo confío en que Italia renazca en su dinamismo y que dentro de poco vuelva a crecer con confianza, la situación no es tan mala.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
18,562 Posts
Cardiaz said:
Pues yo no lo veo exagerado no es que España haya pasado en todo pero ha crecido notablemente y lo peor para Italia es que ha bajado, hace varios años que los indices economicos españoles son los mejores en Europa e incluso los grandes (vease Francia) miran con recelo, Italia hace 15-20 años estaba en todos los sitios en Europa, como nos ibamos a imaginar de otra forma la situacion con el airbus donde Italia no participa. Creo que Italia tiene una división muy importante entre el norte y el sur, que les ha hecho mucho daño. No olvidemos que hablamos de un país que era lanza de Europa en los 70 y 80, y que tiene mas de 15 millones más en población que España.
Supongo que te referirás a los índices de crecimiento, que por otra parte son bastante matizables y no se dan de forma regular por todo el territorio del Estado.

No sé si la culpa del caso italiano la tendrá su inestabilidad política, gobiernos de seis partidos no deben de ser buenos para la salud del ciudadano.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
39 Posts
carabazatowers said:
Ojalá España entera estuviera como Barcelona...
Dios noooooo...!! ;)
@cara, no tengo yo tan claro que en el contraste Lombardía-Sicilia con Catalunya-Extremadura sea precisamente esta última pareja la que salga perdidendo... el lastre de la mafia para el desarrollo económico es aún más grave en la realidad que en la ficción.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
708 Posts
El problema Carabaza es que las regiones más pobres españolas son muy extensas, y en su mayoría con baja densidad poblacional (exceptuando, quizás Andalucia), lo que contrasta con focos de riqueza superconcentrada, como Euskadi, Barcelona o Madrid. Logicamente esto da una sensación de poco aprovechamiento del pais; España tiene mucho camino que recorrer para llegar a ser el 5º grande y dejar de ser el más grande de los pequeños. Con respecto a Italia, le pasa algo parecido que ha España con respecto al Sur-Norte, con la excepción, de que los ricos son mucho más ricos y los pobres solo algo más pobres.
El artículo es un poco exagerado, y mirandolo con imparcialidad, es lógico que España crezca y cree puestos de trabajo con una tasa suoerior a la italiana o a la media de la UE, pues solo hay que pensar de los parametros económicos y de paro que partimos. Y todavía nos queda camino (yo veo una verdadera convergencia dentro de 10-15 años siendo optimistas). Lo de Italia solo me parece un ciclo económico, pues la pujanza industrial que tiene el norte italiano no lo tenemos en España ni juntando Madrid+Barcelona+Euskadi+Valencia+Sevilla. :runaway:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
39 Posts
Dr. EKG said:
Lo de Italia solo me parece un ciclo económico, pues la pujanza industrial que tiene el norte italiano no lo tenemos en España ni juntando Madrid+Barcelona+Euskadi+Valencia+Sevilla. :runaway:
Lo cual implica que lo de España también lo es.
Cuando algún pavo en un mítin soltaba lo mucho que crecía España como si fuéramos lomásdelmundo, se cuidaba muy bien de tapar lo que tú muy bien recuerdas en tu post, a saber, que España ESTÁ OBLIGADA a crecer a lo loco, porque parte de mucho más atrás, si no quiere caer en un paronama como el que pinta ese articulista. Vengo oyendo hablar del pesimismo italiano desde principios de los años 1990, cuando se desvaneció la efímera ilusión del sorpasso de Ferrari...

Por otro lado, que Italia le dé la sensación a la prensa amarilla que está por los suelos, cuando el panorama de crisis y pesimismo es similar en Francia y Alemania, viene dado por el hecho de que, contrariamente a esas dos, Italia fue incluida en el grupo de grandes potencias Europeas, a pesar de no ofrecer el mismo empuje que París, Londres o Berlín para tirar de Europa, más que por el dinamismo de un par de regiones de entre veinte, fundamentalmente por el prestigio cultural del país: una España filipina o una Grecia en ruinas se podían abandonar a su suerte después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial pero, ¿un Occidente con sole mio, villas toscanas y palacios venecianos estalinistas?.. nah

En cualquier caso, es cierto que, en España, los "motores económicos", y particularmente Catalunya, nunca han tenido la fuerza que aún mantienen los de Italia, tanto por culpa de Madrid como de la propia Barcelona: la aristocracia romana se ha reído toda la vida de la burguesía de Milán, mientras la hidalguía madrileña ha estado entretenida, hasta entrada la transición, en que la Pequeña Polonia no se les despegara - en todos los sentidos- antes de decidirse ella misma a despegar -literalmente- y tirar fuerte también del carro, mientras que el eterno deber patriótico nacional de Catalunya es ir a la Corte rogando y con el mazo dando.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,322 Posts
pues digo lo mismo q he dicho en el thread original, q me parece una solemne gilipollez. cmo habeis dicho, españa crece mas q italia porque tb parte desde batnte mas atras. la finalidad de la UE, al menos de los apises mas retrasados, cuando se unen a ella, es precisamente la convergencia con los mas desarrollados. por lo tanto españa nunca sobrepasara a italia (ni a francia, alemania...), y es de suponer q tampoco se alejara de estos paises, simplemente sus economas es de esperar q se vayan igualando
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,220 Posts
Hace 15 ó 20 años Italia estaba mejor que ahora, hoy día tiene peor aspecto que España, varias de las autopistas son malas y los trenes están peor que hace 20 años ya así con muchas cosas.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
39 Posts
snijder said:
Hace 15 ó 20 años Italia estaba mejor que ahora, hoy día tiene peor aspecto que España, varias de las autopistas son malas y los trenes están peor que hace 20 años ya así con muchas cosas.
Pues no quieras pensar como pueda estar TODA EUROPA si la UE y los "agentes sociales" siguen trapicheando como hasta ahora los próximos 20 años.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
708 Posts
Cynick de todas quiero puntualizar, que a pesar de no tener la pujanza del norte de Italia, España tiene dos nucleos tremendamente ricos, como son Madrid (cuarta ciudad europea tras Londres, París, Frankfurt y Milan) y Barcelona que es la séptima. El problema lo veo más en repartir la riqueza; me explico, España tiene repartida la mayoría de su riqueza en un 20 % de su territorio, y en un 40 % de su población; sin embargo Italia tiene zonas muy pobres, pero su riqueza está extendida por un 40-50% de su territorio ( y ya no te hablo de población, pues el norte de Italia está mucho más poblado).
PD: No creo que Madrid este haciendo tan mal las cosas, pues en 22 años de CCAA se ha convertido desde la nada, en el 2º nucleo económico de España a apenas un par de decimas de Cataluña. El problema no es de Madrid y Catal´ña, sino de la falta de dinamismo de la mayoria de la extensión del pais ¿causas?, las que todos sabemos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
708 Posts
eievar, la convergencia es para poner en "igual de condiciones económicas a cada pais", después de retirar los fondos de cohesión, ya sera labor de cada estado "estar uno por encima del otro·, pero no por ley España dentro de 50-70 años tiene quue estar por debajo de Francia o Italia (quien sabe).
Saludos.
 
1 - 20 of 61 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top