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Hazel Grove somehow isn't conducive to it's name. I always thought it was a posh part of Stockport before I went there on a job once. I'm not saying it's a shithole or owt but it just doesn't match it's swanky name ifyaknowattameanlike...:devil:
 

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According to relatives who live nearby.....................................................
They're supposed to be hazel branches...erm...geddit Hazel Grove???
Part of the planning deal with Sainsburys I understand.
Depressingly I understand some public money went into this.

Pointless?
Yes.
 

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Erm pointless art.

Well that is about art.

There are some structures which are literal.

A big obese statute of Empress (sic) Victoria in Piccadilly Gardens is what you get.

A big obese statute of a big obese English monarch.

Then of course if you wish you can interpret the art, give it or not meaning.

For the gaggle of middle aged baldies in city tops singing "Rule Britannia" as I drove down Portland Street, said marble and iron structure probably represents Britain at it's greatest.

For my uncle Pat watching the Olympics in Trim now, Vicky's portly frame represents English
Establishment indifference during the Great Famine.

Now it's another question about whether it is good nor bad.

I might suggest the baldies might love the symbolism, but dislike it's antique fashion.

Pat might think it's a grand old thing and loves such statues. But is delighted the pigeons shayte on her.

My pointed polemic is that art is never pointless for all, except for the individual who defines it as such.

My bet is for many the pointless is in fact not so.
 

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10th February 2008
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Erm pointless art.

Well that is about art.

There are some structures which are literal.

A big obese statute of Empress (sic) Victoria in Piccadilly Gardens is what you get.

A big obese statute of a big obese English monarch.

Then of course if you wish you can interpret the art, give it or not meaning.

For the gaggle of middle aged baldies in city tops singing "Rule Britannia" as I drove down Portland Street, said marble and iron structure probably represents Britain at it's greatest.

For my uncle Pat watching the Olympics in Trim now, Vicky's portly frame represents English
Establishment indifference during the Great Famine.

Now it's another question about whether it is good nor bad.

I might suggest the baldies might love the symbolism, but dislike it's antique fashion.

Pat might think it's a grand old thing and loves such statues. But is delighted the pigeons shayte on her.

My pointed polemic is that art is never pointless for all, except for the individual who defines it as such.

My bet is for many the pointless is in fact not so.
Mr Parks.

If I knew what it symbolised it wouldn't be pointless.(to me)

I even made up things in my head about it while waiting for the traffic lights to change to green.

Don't get me wrong I'm all for public art(B of The Bang, etc), as long as it has a meaning or reason for being.

As of today, I still don't know what it is, and what it's supposed to symbolize.

To tell you the truth I was thinking of cashing in the metal at the nearest scrap metal yard.

It's just hit me!



Mixed reaction to Hazel Grove art installation



A public art installation that was five years in the planning was finally unveiled in Hazel Grove at weekend.

The metal structure, which represents hazel trees, attracted lots of public reaction, even before the unveiling by deputy mayor Anthony O'Neill on Sunday.

The 'grove' of seven, 20ft metal hazel trees was created for Sainsbury's by sculptor Adrian Moakes with the project managed by Stockport Council.

Mr Moakes said: "From some angles it looks like a mass of branches elegantly blowing in the wind. From others, quite appropriately, some local people have related it to the Olympic flame.

"As you enter or leave the village along the busy main road, the overlying impression is of a distinctive avenue of trees – a Hazel grove."

The design was originally chosen in 2007 after an open competition and developed through public consultation events at Sainsbury’s and the Hazel Grove Partnership. It was then followed by an extensive period of refinement and further design development, planning approval, structural engineering analysis and tendering.

Bethell Construction won the contract to fabricate and install the work, which has been welded together by one of Stockport’s oldest family businesses, Luke Lister Blacksmiths.

A Sainsbury’s spokesman said, "We are delighted at the sculpture being unveiled. The design was selected by the Hazel Grove community, and we’re particularly pleased that it was made by local Stockport blacksmiths, Luke Listers."

Passing members of the public weren't sure what to make of the installation.

Passer-by John Gradwell, of Great Moor, said: "Has it got something to do with Christmas? It looks to me like a herd of reindeer, but with no sign of Rudolph. What a pity they didn't put real trees there instead."

Another member of the public, Dorato Cerone, from Reddish, said: "It might be art but it doesn't do it for me.

"It would have been better to have put in proper shrubs or trees."
I need time to think. Hazel Trees. Hmmm.
 

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Just give it your own meaning Jean Paul Jrb.

Let it represent what you wish in your own imagination.

Has it got a reason? Yeah maybe it exists to artistically represent literally the Hazel tree from which Hazel Grove gets it's name.

Maybe its reason is to tidy up a corner or help identity the place to turn for a supermarket for hard working soccer dads as they busy themselves for another days work.

In the post modernist era, art doesn't need to either symbolic, representative or even have a specific purpose or meaning. Pseud bolix I agree, but think about it. It's does not need one.

Just make it up brother.
 

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10th February 2008
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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Just give it your own meaning Jean Paul Jrb.

Let it represent what you wish in your own imagination.

Has it got a reason? Yeah maybe it exists to artistically represent literally the Hazel tree from which Hazel Grove gets it's name.

Maybe its reason is to tidy up a corner or help identity the place to turn for a supermarket for hard working soccer dads as they busy themselves for another days work.

In the post modernist era, art doesn't need to either symbolic, representative or even have a specific purpose or meaning. Pseud bolix I agree, but think about it. It's does not need one.

Just make it up brother.
Got it!

It's the Caesar Augustus Hybrid Larger tree, where I can go and pick as many bottles as I want, instead of paying £2.09 per bottle across the way at Sainsbury's.

TBH I'm on Rossini Birra from Aldi's ATM. Very nice indeed. Light and refreshing. Exactly what an Italian Birra should taste like.

Cheers that man. :cheers:
 

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I might try that.

The Birra.

That is.

Not the rather poor attempt at art.

If so, I will sit under it, drying in the cold air, smelling of my urine, drinking Old Tom as a situationist retort to the Stockport metal skinny trees.

My time will come.

When does Aldi open?
 

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10th February 2008
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I might try that.

The Birra.

That is.

Not the rather poor attempt at art.

If so, I will sit under it, drying in the cold air, smelling of my urine, drinking Old Tom as a situationist retort to the Stockport metal skinny trees.

My time will come.

When does Aldi open?
8am.

PS. It's a 66cl bottle as well. :) 4.7% vol. Definitely worth a try. One for the Mancunian Beer thread mi thinks.
 

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I actually drew the steel fabrication drawings for the artist that designed the sculpture. I don't know what they represent either but do think it's turned out ok. I'll pass on all your positive comments! :)
 

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^^^^ Monsieur Debord.

Pointless, erm no.

Tax breaks for supermarkets. Possibly.

Crap. yes.

But as a cremated French situationist, oddly and rebelliously re located in Manchester, I am sure you have another subversive plan for the apparent anvil or truncated wooden cowboy thingy outside Morrisons.

Good one you Mark the artist. You see, SSC Mancunia does attract the good, the clever and the creative laced with knowledge, occasional vitriol and surrealism.
 
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