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I love the early rendering of the new Moyer Tower. That area is going to look very nice.

I read the article that this tower may spark a new trend of highrises in downtown. Will we ever see something near 600'?

The Broadway Tower, is this still on? This tower looks to be around 400'+ from the renderings.
 

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OHSU sells waterfront parcel
Portland Business Journal - 10:27 AM PST Monday


Oregon Health & Science University is selling a one-block parcel in the South Waterfront District to Pacific Retirement Services Inc.

Medford-based Pacific Retirement Services plans to build a a 30-story residential tower at the site.


The 507,300-square-foot continuing care retirement community, to be named Mirabella, at Block 31, will be located two blocks south of OHSU's new Center for Health & Healing. Plans call for the building to have 224 independent living residences, 16 assisted living apartments, 20 skilled-nursing private rooms, 21 special care memory-support private rooms and 244 parking spaces.


Construction is set to begin in spring 2008, with completion planned for summer or early fall 2010.
 

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OHSU plans senior tower as 'living lab'
Aging - The 30-story building in South Waterfront would double for research
Tuesday, January 23, 2007
DYLAN RIVERA
The Oregonian

Oregon Health & Science University on Monday launched a partnership to build a senior housing tower that will put hundreds of prospective patients at its South Waterfront doorstep and create what the university calls a "living laboratory" for university researchers.

The university is selling a block in the new neighborhood to Medford-based Pacific Retirement Services Inc., which plans to build a 30-story senior housing building that would offer a range of retirement living options, from apartments to nursing home level care.

The arrangement will strengthen OHSU's relationship with Intel, OHSU officials said, as the two can work to develop devices and techniques aimed at making aging easier. Ideas range from computerized gadgets to remind patients to take medication to new drugs or treatments for dementia-related illnesses.

Yet it's not clear whether building a senior housing tower helps the university deliver in any significant way on its long-standing promise to develop a bioscience industry with 6,000 jobs.

Bioscience-based economic development on the waterfront was the central theme of then-OHSU President Peter Kohler's successful pitch to the Legislature in 2001 for $200 million in taxpayer-backed bonds to fund the construction of a new research building on Marquam Hill and the recruitment of about 100 new faculty members.

Many outside observers at the time were skeptical of Portland's ability to attract significant interest from biotech employers, and Monday's announcement did little to reduce that skepticism.

Joe Cortright, a Portland economist who has researched site-selection criteria for the biotech industry, said the new partnership would reinforce housing momentum on South Waterfront and perhaps hospital revenues. But, he said, it is unlikely to attract or create many bioscience employers.

"The really talented entrepreneurs and scientists are much more likely to be created and flourish in places where there are strong biotechnology clusters, and that's not in Portland," he said.

Pacific Retirement will pay $8 million for the block and, once its operation is up and running, will kick in a $3 million license fee to OHSU.

The 325-foot tower will equal in height the elliptical John Ross tower, its neighbor to the south.

The joint venture of a medical research center with a senior housing property appears to be rare, OHSU officials said.

OHSU's director of research, Dan Dorsa, said the partnership with developers of the retirement community related to OHSU's strategic priorities in research, including efforts to advance technology to improve care of the elderly.

"This doesn't mean we're diverting from our interest in standard biotech on the South Waterfront or elsewhere," Dorsa said.

Eric Dishman, manager of Intel's Digital Health Group in Hillsboro, said he hopes the building will help the company take new technologies for seniors from the testing lab to real-life situations, something the high-tech niche desperately needs more of.

Intel already uses Pacific Retirement communities in Medford and in Portland to test new devices, Dishman said. For example, the company has made a "caller ID on steroids" that helps Alzheimer's patients remember a person who is calling them on the phone. A screen shows the caller's picture, along with reminders about recent topics of discussion between the patient and the caller.

University researchers are keenly interested in having proximity and access to a retirement community where new drugs, devices and nursing techniques can be tested, said Steve Stadum, executive vice of OHSU. When the university first thought of soliciting ideas for such a center in the South Waterfront in May 2005, researchers from a variety of schools clamored for an opportunity to be involved.

A committee representing nursing, engineering, Alzheimer's research and other disciplines reviewed the proposals and selected Pacific Retirement from among a handful of finalists, Stadum said .

The project won't have doctors' offices built into it, though medical offices in the OHSU Center for Health & Healing are two blocks away.

Pacific Retirement has not set prices for rooms in the building, called the Mirabella. Building plans include a small swimming pool, informal dining venues throughout and a 25th-floor dining room, with views of the river and the Portland skyline.

The sale of the land to Pacific Retirement is all but final but won't close until late June. Construction could start in 2008 and be completed in 2010.

Ted Sickinger contributed to this story. Dylan Rivera: 503-221-8532, [email protected]
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/business/11695263127380.xml&coll=7
 

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^medical buildings always seem to take an incredible amount of time to construct. The new Providence Cancer Center off the 84 has been under construction for a year and a half now and is still not set to open until next year.
 

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these pictures are of a building that same develeper that is building park avenue west build a couple years ago
Moyer's last beautey





these are the buildings that are going to be replaced by park avenue west













and i liked this one it has so many different types of architecture plus american spirit!

this is the underground parking garage below a park















close up

closer up



close up









meier and frank remodel



















i like this reflection it looks like god is looking over the city



the cars are so reflective





















so reflective















and i'll close with some more reflection
 

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wonderful pictures!

i ESPECIALLY like your photos of the construction sites

its always interesting to see how deep the foundations go


What is the building they are putting in near the fox toweR?

how tall is it going to be?
 

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^410' Park Avenue West by Moyer. There is a rendering on post #122

wait

im confused


i thought that the park avenue west was just started?

that site looks like it has been being prepped for some time...

i thought they were taking some buildings out for the park avenue west.. or have they already done that?


sorry for the confusion im a n00b
 

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^I think you are thinking of Park Block 5



this is Park Block 5 (Marilyn Moyer Plaza). It will be 7 stories of underground parking that connects underground with the parking structure at the Fox Tower. On top of the parking will be a park that has yet to be fully designed, but will be European Plaza in style.



this is the future site for Moyer's Park Avenue West. Those buildings on the block will be demolished this year with construction of the new tower set to begin as early as fall. (you can see park block 5 on the right corner of the pic)
 

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AHhh yes Mark thank you for clearing that up!

wow 7 stories of underground parking? thats excellent! and a park on top?

very nice :)

I was getting excited thinking that there was going to be a THIRD tower going in, in that area..............
 

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there is, on the Smart Park garage (10th and Yamhill). The PDC issued an RFP and is going through the selection process. Gerding-Edlen has been looking at the block, rumored at least, to build Portland's new tallest.
 

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I'm amazed at what is going on in Portland right now. That would be awesome if all these towers get built. If these are all built (including the new tallest and of course the Park block 4 at 35 stories along with everything else in the downtown area), Portland's skyline will be completely transformed.

I'm also very intrigued about the Tanasbourne high rise district. I'm curious if I'll be able to see the any of that development from my house in Beaverton! It's only about a mile and a half away so I'd bet I'd be able to see a lot of the highrises if not most of the towers.
 

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I'm also very intrigued about the Tanasbourne high rise district. I'm curious if I'll be able to see the any of that development from my house in Beaverton! It's only about a mile and a half away so I'd bet I'd be able to see a lot of the highrises if not most of the towers.

Its close to me as well, it is going to transform the area.....


they will be extending Stucki road over the Sunset and adding on and off ramps...

they will also be extending 173rd over the Sunset and adding on and off ramps

i bet they will make that whole area kind of like the Bethany BLVD and Cornell overpasses and make one off ramp and one on ramp on either side of the highway......
 

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^do you have any more information on that project than what the Oregonian printed? As much as I'd like to see our burbs rise, it seems like the housing market, for the time at least, has depressed so much there's no banks lending money for condos in tested markets, let alone new territory. It could get done if this project is privately funded by some ambitious developers dream. Or, maybe they are possibly laying the groundwork for when the market trends back up...in any case, I've only seen one story about the project.
 

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^do you have any more information on that project than what the Oregonian printed? As much as I'd like to see our burbs rise, it seems like the housing market, for the time at least, has depressed so much there's no banks lending money for condos in tested markets, let alone new territory. It could get done if this project is privately funded by some ambitious developers dream. Or, maybe they are possibly laying the groundwork for when the market trends back up...in any case, I've only seen one story about the project.


no i havent found anything yet.

ive looked around but so far i dont think there is alot of progress being made on it....and i dont think there is anyone to contact yet....maybe it will pick up over the next year?


Well i bet it will get pushed through by the planning commission or something

especially with the addition of the new hospital and the potential street car AND the new PCC campus, and they are improving the road connections in the area its gonna be a pretty dense little area

i was thinking of moving into one of those condos in 5 years when they are finished!



but i dont know if i will be able to afford them they were saying it was going to be geared towards the higher income bracket.....which means they will be expensive....and people like expensive things!
 

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OHSU's biggest gift ever puts dream campus closer
The $40 million windfall kick-starts plans for a South Waterfront medical school complex
Friday, February 09, 2007
JOE ROJAS-BURKE and TED SICKINGER
The Oregonian

Oregon Health & Science University's uncertain but ambitious plan to expand its medical school on Portland's South Waterfront got a boost Thursday when the university announced an anonymous $40 million donation -- the largest gift ever received by the state's only medical school.

The gift not only launches the next phase of OHSU's expansion, but it also propels the building boom in the city's biggest new real estate development.

OHSU President Joe Robertson, who announced the award Thursday at an employee gathering, said the money would anchor financing of a medical school building on a 20-acre parcel of riverfront land given to the university by the Schnitzer family in 2004.

"We're now at a point where we can build a building," Robertson said. "This changes the whole landscape."

Robertson said Perkins+Will, a commercial architecture firm, had estimated that OHSU could build the first building of a new interdisciplinary medical school complex on the waterfront for about $50 million. OHSU's medical, dental and nursing schools have outgrown their warren of offices and classrooms on Marquam Hill.

OHSU officials declined to answer questions about the donor's identity or the donor's ties with OHSU. Michael MacRae, spokesman for the OHSU Foundation, said the donor insisted no details be disclosed. He said expanding medical education "was something the donor felt really strongly about, that this was the best way those resources could be used."

Robertson stressed it was still too early to say what the first building would look like, when it would be finished and how its ongoing operation would be financed. The expansion will be subject to extensive public reviews and probably will require the city to undertake major road and utility upgrades for the land.

Shortage of caregivers

Medical school costs are covered largely by student tuition -- now $26,063 a year for Oregon residents and $36,983 for out-of-state students -- and a 7.8 percent tax on the earnings of faculty physicians. Robinson, president since September, has said that tackling the state's looming shortage of health-care workers is a top priority.

Over the next 10 years, state officials estimate, Oregon will need to add 59,000 medical providers -- about 5,900 a year --to fill projected demand for registered nurses, physical therapists, counselors, dentists, doctors and other caregivers.

Employment Department economist Brenda Turner said Oregon will need about 200 additional physicians a year -- nearly twice the number graduating each year from OHSU. Turner said the department can't pinpoint the potential supply of those doctors because it has no good way to project how many doctors are likely to move to the state and how many trained here will practice elsewhere.

Gov. Ted Kulongoski's budget recommends $11.2 million to expand OHSU's capacity to train medical students. With outside funding uncertain, OHSU has turned to collaborations as a way to expand its output of doctors. The medical school has already begun expanding beyond Portland by establishing satellite campuses for medical students in Eugene and Corvallis.

Students at those satellite campuses, however, will need to complete their training on the main campus in Portland, where OHSU's medical school is already full.

Nontraditional model

OHSU's officials say the Schnitzer campus will depart from the siloed model of the traditional medical school, offering an interdisciplinary environment where medical, nursing, dental, pharmacy and engineering students share research and classroom space and a core curriculum, and collaborate with researchers and physicians on the South Waterfront.

Nearby, OHSU recently opened an outpatient center, linked by tram to its main campus on Marquam Hill.

A $40 million gift is rare in Oregon's philanthropic world. The state has far fewer donors with the liquid wealth to make a cash donation of that size than its neighbors to the north and south.

OHSU has received only two other eight-figure gifts in its 120-year history. In 1987, Tektronix Inc. co-founder Howard Vollum endowed a neuroscience institute with a $14 million gift. In 2004, the Schnitzer land donation was valued at $33.9 million.

Stephen Sanders, president of the OHSU Foundation, said the university wasn't actively soliciting donations for the new campus, or launching a silent phase of a new campaign as institutions often do before formally unveiling their plans. Sanders said the foundation wouldn't even start a feasibility study on the campaign until late this year.

But Sanders said the cash windfall would "accelerate the planning."

OHSU only recently completed its $500 million Oregon Opportunity Campaign. While successful in meeting its overall goals, the campaign struggled to hit funding goals for two new buildings.

OHSU probably will seek some form of taxpayer support for the Schnitzer campus, said Keith Thomson, chairman of OHSU's board of directors. That's far from guaranteed: The university's annual budget appropriation has consistently dwindled since it became a separate, "public" corporation in 1995.

The state already kicked in $200 million in OHSU's last fundraising campaign, paying to construct a research building on Marquam Hill and to recruit nearly 100 scientists and physicians.

The university may not be shy about going back to the well, but it's less clear whether legislators will pour more money into Portland's South Waterfront.

The $40 million gift probably will be awarded to OHSU over a period of years, said MacRae, the OHSU Foundation spokesman. "It remains to be resolved exactly how that would work," he said.

Joe Rojas-Burke: 503-412-7073, [email protected]
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/business/1170996913146170.xml&coll=7
 
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