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26 Posts
Right now:

Canon 7D
Rokinon 8mm fisheye
Canon 17-55 f/2.8
Canon 24-70 f/2.8
Canon 50mm 1.8
Canon 70-200 f/2.8

Soon to buy the 5d and will probably drop the 17-55 and pick up the canon 11-24 or something on that end.
 

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Canon EOS 1200D

Canon EOS 1200D
18MP - APS-C CMOS Sensor
ISO 100 - 6400
3″ Fixed Type Screen
Optical (pentamirror) viewfinder
3 fps continuous shooting
1920 x 1080 video resolution
480g. 130 x 100 x 78 mm
Also known as EOS Rebel T5 / EOS Kiss X70
 

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Buffalo's Idealist💡
Buffalo's Idealist💡
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4,587 Posts
I have decided to jump in to the game with a Canon 20d and some decent lenses. I am on a budget and would rather have an old inexpensive body with good quality lenses for when I upgrade.
and here it is

 

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Arquitextualizado
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7,217 Posts
I have updated my gear recently:

Cameras
DSLR: Pentax K-3 :drool: The best camera buy I've ever made


I have also a Pentax K-200D, my old and beloved camera.

Film SLR: Pentax K-1000 - Nikon F50

Lenses
SMC Pentax-DA 16-45mm F4. Sharp!
SMC Pentax-DA 18-55mm. Kit lens, is ok, but not too much
SMC Pentax-DAL 55-300mm F4-5.8. It will soon be replaced with a DA*60-250mm
Sigma 10-20mm F4-5.6 EX DC J. Nice range
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SMC Pentax-A 50mm F2
SMC Pentax-M 135mm F3.5
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Accesories:
Tripod Manfrotto 290 XTA Kit
A lot of filters, and a nice LowePro Backpack.

I am heading to get the Pentax K-1 finishing 2017, waiting some price dropping. It will be a lot of money to invest, because I have also to include at least 2 new telephotos considering that all my digital lenses are APS-C.
 

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2,205 Posts
MY TOOLS:

CANON EOS 5D MKII
CANON EOS M
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CANON EF 17-40MM F4 L
CANON EF 24-105MM F4 L IS
CANON EF 35MM F2
CANON EF 40MM F2.8
CANON EF 50MM F1.4
CANON EF 85MM F1.4
CANON EF 100MM F2.8

CANON EF-S 55-250MM F4-5.6 IS II

CANON SPEEDLITE 270EX II
NISSIN DI600
 

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13 Posts
There are my kids:


Canon 60D

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Peleng 8mm f3.5
Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM
Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM
Canon EF 50mm f/1.8
Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L IS USM

and other toys, but i'm thinking in a FF 6D, so I'll need some changes :p
 

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374 Posts
Only just discovered the photo forum here. :)

Shooting with Nikon D3300 + 18-55mm VRII + 35mm 1.8g dx + 85mm 1.8g.
Everything has its use, but man, I love the primes. :)
 

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Hey guys!

I recently took a course in photography at a Dutch school.
I'm really excited to start taking photo's, but still need to buy my own camera.
Anyone have any idea which camera is best for beginners?


Thanks!
 

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Brasil | Mexico
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18,535 Posts
Hey guys!

I recently took a course in photography at a Dutch school.
I'm really excited to start taking photo's, but still need to buy my own camera.
Anyone have any idea which camera is best for beginners?


Thanks!

Read this (dated June 5th, 2015):
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?p=124558226#post124558226

*******

Hello all member, i'm nubie here, any suggest for me, which one camera for beginner. Thank you...
A DSLR camera is my recommendation (any of them). DSLR means "Digital Single-Lens Reflex" camera.

With them, you can have full control of the traditional photography settings (aperture + shutter speed + ISO sensitivity). The freedom to control these settings is key for great pictures. The vast majority of the small automatic digital pocket cameras, and cell phones, don't let you exercise control over the lens aperture, the camera shutter speed, and the sensor ISO sensitivity.

Moreover, all DSLRs allow you interchangeable lenses. That means you can change the lens, allowing you to have a versatile array of lens options, from ultra-wide angles to super-telefoto range. Cell phones and pokect cameras do not share this feature. This is as much important as the controls over these settings mentioned above. Rule #1 for serious photographers: the lens is always more important that the camera body. You will always get better image quality with a "high-end pro level lens + low-end entry level DSLR", than with a "low-end entry level lens + high-end pro level DSLR" combination.

I always recommend either Nikon or Canon. But Sony and Pentax are also doing excellent cameras nowadays. They all do really good DSLR, from a beginners level to pro level. I went with Nikon myself, once I believe Nikon offers the better system out there today (system = combination of DSLR camera capabilities and a variaty of lenses able to deliver high end image quality at a better price point).

The DSLR current models for beginners, as offered by Nikon, are:
  • Nikon D3200 or Nikon D3300: 24 megapixel sensor, entry level DSLR. Aimed for photographers buying a DSLR for the very first time. It's very user friendly, with self-explanatory menus for beginners. USD $450-500, with a Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 kit lens (3x zoom lens, from wide to normal range).
  • Nikon D5300 or Nikon D5500: 24 megapixel sensor, intermediary entry level + camera, with an articulated/flip screen for better angles, for video, and for selfies. It's very user friendly, with easy menus for most fast learning beginners. USD $750-850, with a Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 kit lens (3x zoom lens, from wide to normal range). USD $950-1050, with a Nikkor 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6 kit lens (7.7x zoom lens, from wide to telephoto range).
  • Nikon 7100 or Nikon D7200: 24 megapixel sensor, high end entry level camera. You should get this one if you already have some previous knowledge on how to control a DSLR camera, once it's aimed for more advanced users. But any fast learning beginners can catch up with it easily. USD $1200-1500, with a Nikkor 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6 kit lens (7.7x zoom lens, from wide to telephoto range).
  • Other Nikon DSLR models, like the D610, D750, DF, D810, D4s are much more expensive models, once they are full frame models (that means they have a larger sensor inside, generating even better image quality, but much more expensive as well). The D810 and the D4s are the two more pro level DSLR cameras offered by Nikon. Don't venture yourself with them, if you don't have any previous good knowledge of SLR or DSLR photography.
  • Here is Nikon's DSLR camera map: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Nikon_DSLR_cameras
  • And here is Canon's DSLR camera map as well: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Canon_EOS_digital_cameras
My recommendation would be:
  1. If you're not experienced with SLR/DSLR photography, and you think you're not a fast learner user, get either a D3200, or a D3300, with the Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 kit lens. They're both excellent cameras. Here sample shots produced by them: D3200 & D3300.
  2. If you're not experienced with SLR/DSLR photography, but you believe you're a fast learner user, get a D5300, or a D5500, either with the Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6, or with a Nikkor 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6 kit lens. The 18-140mm is a bit better, and more flexible. Here sample shots made with them: D5300 & D5500.
  3. If you want to learn enough to become a future professional in photography, get either a D7100 or a D7200, with the Nikkor 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6 kit lens. Here are sample shots taken with them: D7100 & D7200.
Furthermore, if you can, I highly recommend you also buying at least one second lens to your DSLR, so you can start to practice and understand the difference among lenses. Some recommendations are:
  • Nikkor AF-S 35mm f/1.8G DX (USD $200): No zoom here, but it is a very fast lens (given the low f/#: f/1.8). That means it's able to take photos at very low light levels, like during night time, much more easy, and without flash, than the slow lenses (the ones with higher f/#, like f/3.5-5.6). For a zoom lens to be able to achieve f/1.8, it will be a very expensi lens, like this one here. Being a fixed 35mm lens, means that you will have a wide to normal perspective, which is ideal for pictures taken outdoors, like vacation shots, group of few people, etc. Here are sample pictures with this lens.
  • Nikkor AF-S 50mm f/1.8G (USD $220): No zoom here, but it is a very fast lens (given the low f/#: f/1.8). So great for low light situations. Being a fixed 50mm lens, means that you will have a normal eye level perspective. It is great as a portraiture lens, specially for head shot portraits. Here are sample pictures with this lens.
  • Nikkor AF-S 40mm f/2.8G Micro (USD $280): No zoom here, but it is a reasonably fast lens (given the low f/#: f/2.8). Good for low light situations. But this one is a Micro lens, that means you can do macro photography, or very close focus photography, amplifying your subject greatly (in case you want to do very close up photos). Being a fixed 40mm lens, means that you will have a wide to normal perspective. The other two options shown before are faster (f/1.8), but they don't do close-up/macro work as this one. That's the trade off. Here are sample pictures with this lens.
  • Tamron SP 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD telephoto zoom lens for Nikon (USD $350-450): This is an economical zoom telephoto lens, among the best for entry level users. It features a 4.3x zoom at the telephoto end. That means the lens will be a great magnifier for far away subjects, from 70mm to 300mm, which are great focal lengths for real zoomed in perspectives of far away subjects. Tamron is a third party lens manufacturer, producing lenses for Nikon, Canon, Sony, Pentax and other. Make you get one that macthes your DSLR camera maker model. Here are sample pictures with this lens.

These are all entry level lenses, but very very much capable, with excellent image quality. No question about that. The ultra pro level lenses for DSLR are very much expensive, like these ones, for example:
I'm sharing more the Nikon side of DSLRs here, once I'm a Nikon user, and am more familiarized with Nikon myself. But Nikon is not all there is out there. Canon, Sony and Pentax are also great brands, and they all have great DSLR products for beginners (and pros) as well.

Good luck with your choice.
 
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