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Kalpakkam breeder reactor to go on stream....



Thrilled to hear...wait a minute.. The Hindu was dated : CHENNAI, July 08, 2015 02:25 IST

Project started in 2004. Estimated Construction cost‎: ‎₹5,677 crore ...
The top bureaucrats running that project are either shameless or clueless to say the least. They have been proudly issuing statements to the public not only in India but all over the World (to foreign technical journals etc.) about the imminent commissioning of the reactor, since 2015! Some foreign tech journals have finally cottoned on to what is going on and are commenting negatively about this constant announcement and delay game and it is embarrassing. The FBR program is one of India's prestigious strategic program and they need to protect its reputation by keeping their pie hole shut until things are working. They need to learn from ISRO, which has done a great job in this regard.
 

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https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chennai/chennai-tangedco-to-add-2100-mw-thermal-capacity-in-2-years/articleshow/69868942.cms



After years of delay, Tangedco has stepped up work onthree

of its pending thermal power units with a view to adding2,120MW to its

existing capacity of 4,320MW inthe next two years.

Always plans or steps up on something after it comes to breaking point.

It’s shameful Chennai is suffering long blackouts in 2019. 100% unhindered power supply should be in the bare minimum requirements of a metro city or even a HDI state. Shame on TANGEDCO.
 

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The top bureaucrats running that project are either shameless or clueless to say the least. They have been proudly issuing statements to the public not only in India but all over the World (to foreign technical journals etc.) about the imminent commissioning of the reactor, since 2015! Some foreign tech journals have finally cottoned on to what is going on and are commenting negatively about this constant announcement and delay game and it is embarrassing. The FBR program is one of India's prestigious strategic program and they need to protect its reputation by keeping their pie hole shut until things are working. They need to learn from ISRO, which has done a great job in this regard.
Kalpakkam breeder reactor to go on stream....



Thrilled to hear...wait a minute.. The Hindu was dated : CHENNAI, July 08, 2015 02:25 IST

Project started in 2004. Estimated Construction cost‎: ‎₹5,677 crore ...

Last month I visited a nuclear plant (now a museum) in a remote desert in Idaho, USA, claimed to be the world's first nuclear plant for civilian purpose - commissioned in 1951. Guess what? It was a sodium cooled breeder reactor!!! Just a few hundred KW capacity. Details about the plant said "it was built to prove the genius Enrico Fermi's theory on breeding fissionable fuel". (USA had already built many conventional graphite/water moderator/coolant reactors by late 1940s but they were for nuclear submarines only).

During the next two decades USA/France/UK/Germany/Japan/Russia built fast breeder reactors >500MW capacity and all but Russia have permanently shut them down for various reasons.

I learnt that the costly and messy breeder reactors are not needed when a country has assured supply of uranium.
 

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Last month I visited a nuclear plant (now a museum) in a remote desert in Idaho, USA, claimed to be the world's first nuclear plant for civilian purpose - commissioned in 1951. Guess what? It was a sodium cooled breeder reactor!!! Just a few hundred KW capacity. Details about the plant said "it was built to prove the genius Enrico Fermi's theory on breeding fissionable fuel". (USA had already built many conventional graphite/water moderator/coolant reactors by late 1940s but they were for nuclear submarines only).

During the next two decades USA/France/UK/Germany/Japan/Russia built fast breeder reactors >500MW capacity and all but Russia have permanently shut them down for various reasons.

I learnt that the costly and messy breeder reactors are not needed when a country has assured supply of uranium.
Yes, most countries have given up on FBRs. France operated its one and only commercial FBR (Super-Phoenix, I think) and had lots of issues, radioactive leaks etc. and then shut it down. The only operating FBR reactor is in Russia, that was commissioned recently ( in the last 5 years or so)

Combine tons of highly radio-active/toxic nuclear materials, 100s of MW of heat and electricity, 1000s of liters of hot liquid sodium, water and steam and what can go wrong?! Everything and mightily so. I really hope they know what they are doing.
 

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Why thorium is a safer nuclear option

The picture is crystal clear. Human activity will soon drive the climate crisis all across our planet to the tipping point unless we rapidly transform the ways in which we produce and consume energy. While renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency measures can help dramatically cut emissions of greenhouse gases, they are not the panacea for the climate change related problems that we have created.

The scope and impacts of climate change, therefore, demand that we consider other possible low or zero greenhouse-gas-emitting sources of energy, including nuclear power. Indeed, nearly every major authority on climate change, including the International Energy Agency and the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (Fourth Assessment Report), has said that to achieve deep decarbonisation, nuclear energy must be part of the solution.

All nuclear power plants in operation today rely on controlled fission, which involves neutron-induced splitting of one of the isotopes of uranium into two lighter fragments and two or three neutrons. Despite being a clean source of energy, there exists bitter controversy surrounding the risks of harnessing energy released during fission. Some of the risks are core meltdown (as seen in the 2011 Fukushima disaster), hazards of disposing of radioactive waste, harmful effects of radiation and nuclear proliferation. These risks have made nuclear power a contentious topic bordering between our greatest hopes and deepest fears for the future.

If fission-based nuclear power plants are to play a major role in combating global warming, then we want them to be free from fears of a catastrophic, runaway chain reaction. Even more, we want a nuclear fuel that would produce manageable amounts of radioactive waste. We also want a fuel that does not possess the threat of falling into the wrong hands and becoming a deadly weapon of mass destruction.

Many countries are addressing the worrisome problems associated with uranium-fuelled reactors and exploring the possibilities of other forms of safe, clean and incontrovertible nuclear fuel. An alternative that is receiving serious attention from the nuclear stakeholders is using thorium, instead of uranium, as nuclear fuel.


Thorium is a non-fissile, “fertile”, slightly radioactive element. Being non-fissile, it cannot be split to create a nuclear chain reaction, so it must be bred through nuclear reactors to produce fissile uranium.

Thorium enjoys several advantages over uranium. First, the risk of nuclear proliferation of thorium is less than that of uranium. This comes mostly from the fact that plutonium, an essential ingredient of nuclear weapons, is not produced in thorium reactors. Thorium fuel cycle would also minimise toxicity and decay heat problems associated with current reactors.

Secondly, in the event of a runaway chain reaction, uranium-based reactors have the potential to become supercritical and get out of control, thereby causing a catastrophic accident. Since thorium reactors would operate sub-critically, runaway chain reactions that cause nuclear meltdowns would not occur.

Thorium has other advantages too. The inventory of radioactive waste produced by thorium would be much less than uranium. A thorium reactor burns nearly all of its fuel. As a result, it will produce less waste. While some trace elements in spent uranium fuels remain radioactive for many thousands of years, levels in spent thorium fuels drop off much faster. Moreover, unlike conventional reactors that run at potentially explosive, pressurised environments at much higher temperatures, thorium-fuelled reactors can be operated at atmospheric pressure.

Thorium reactors use a combination of thorium and liquid fluoride salts to power the reactor. Fluoride salts have very high boiling points, meaning even a large spike in heat will not cause a massive increase in pressure. This feature greatly limits the chance of a containment explosion. Besides, the reactors don’t require massive cooling, meaning they can be placed anywhere and can be air-cooled.

Thorium is roughly three-four times more abundant in nature than uranium. The most common source is a mineral called monazite, which contains about 12 percent thorium phosphate. Large known deposits are in India, Australia and Norway. Some of the largest reserves are found in Idaho in the USA.

With large, easily accessible reserves of thorium and relatively little uranium, India has made utilisation of thorium for large-scale energy production a major goal in its nuclear power programme. The country has successfully developed a thorium fuel cycle at the nuclear power plant in Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu. China hopes to build a fully functional thorium-fuelled reactor within the next 10-15 years. Norway is currently in the midst of testing thorium as a fuel in existing nuclear reactors. Other countries with active thorium research programmes include the United Kingdom, Canada, Japan, Germany, Russia and Israel.

If thorium is a safe and versatile nuclear fuel, then why do we use unsafe uranium? The real reason we use uranium over thorium is a result of the Cold World-era politics. Nuclear superpowers backed uranium-based reactors because they produce plutonium—handy for making nuclear weapons. The fact that thorium reactors fail the weapon-making test meant the better reactor fuel got the short shrift.

Nevertheless, if the choice is between keeping nuclear power facilities running or shutting them down and replacing them with coal-fired power plants, the nuclear option with thorium as fuel is ideal for the climate. It is the best supplement to sustainable green energy, filling the gap until nuclear fusion reactors are built. (In an op-ed piece published in this newspaper on May 26, 2019, I discussed fusion energy as the safest form of nuclear energy.)

Finally, regardless of the fear among the public and many activists about nuclear power, thorium reactors are a safer, realistic solution to humanity’s greatest problem. Without nuclear power, we would foreclose our ability to avert the environmental disaster that we brought upon us.
 

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While the farmers and others in chattishgarh,odisha,Telangana and AP have not protested when the HT transmission lines & towers were erected and many such HT lines crisscross the states and people going about unperturbed what these fellows fear in TN.Are these chaps not shock proof.:lol: Of late some fringe groups and tiny political parties in TN have become great scientists and opinion makers dispensing views and objections to almost all projects taking advantage of the disoriented nature of rural folks like the war lords in Afghanistan do to keep the people under leash.If people can be easily misled these things happen and few fellows derive sadistic pleasure.
 

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^^^ even in chennai, this varies from area to area....so it is more of distribution infra in some area lagging behind few other areas....

For eg: i reside in Thoraipakkam opposite to AKDR..power rarely goes off (touchwood :) and there is no voltage fluctuation either.....but in perungudi CBI colony (behind Apollo) there is frequent power cut as well as voltage fluctuation....

While many new substations have been established, guess in some areas the transformers and the local substations require make over/additional infra
 

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I see this only in Chennai & suburbs, this maintenance, and power cuts. Why?
Might be summer demand and stress on grid! Also I understand from many pump running hours have increased substantially around Chennai area due to ground water level. So various factors..

This time Cauvery might fail us.. it is a curse & cycle..! It is been long time we saw Cauvery full, Mettur dam full and also all lakes in north TN is surplus. SW monsoon might not even fill the Mettur dam upto 75 feet this time. But NE monsoon might bring plenty for Northern dt. So next year demand will sour from agri side.. especially Central dt.

As you said in other thread.. not just for Chennai. TN needs to prepare itself for two monsoon failure consecutive years, SW excess, NW fail or wise versa. Need to be prepared outself for whatever possibilities.
 

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Had like a 5hr unannounced power cut today in my suburb.

Mumbai and many other cities can go even an year without a power cut for even scheduled maintenance. Only natural reasons or man made disruptions brings the power down. But Chennai neighborhoods still even today gets scheduled maintenance cuts like the systems are from dark ages. Not to say other parts of the state. I have no idea why they need 5-6 hours of scheduled maintenance power cuts every month. Bunch of incompetents.

TANGEDCO and TNEB are a disgrace to this state.
 

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The main reason is, TANGEDCO tries to meet the needs of 10,000 people with infrastructure built for 1000 or less, years ago.

Fair to them, they don't create this scenario... Govt. policy of licensing buildings with 1.5 to 10 FSI, without corresponding increase in infrastructure is the culprit.
 

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Chennai to get two thermal power plants using natural gas

Two thermal units with a capacity of 730MW will be set up in North Chennai at a cost of Rs 5,000 crore, chief minister Edappadi K Palaniswami announced in the assembly on Monday. These power plants will be different from other thermal plants since they will be using natural gas instead of coal.

The chief minister said the government would allocate Rs 3,000 crore towards replacing equipment at thermal plants owned by Tangedco with better equipment to prevent pollution efficiently.

New sub-stations with a capacity of 230kV will be set up in Tiruvannamalai, Namakkal and Tirunelveli districts. They will be set up at a cost of Rs 510 crore. Six sub-stations with a capacity of 110kV each will be set up in Chennai, Thanjavur, Villupuram, Perambalur, Coimbatore and Salem districts at a total cost of Rs 135 crore, the chief minister said.

In cyclone Gaja-hit Nagapattinam district, 100km of overhead lines will be replaced with underground cables at a cost of Rs 300 crore. Steps would be taken to appoint 150 assistant engineers in Tangedco, the chief minister said.
 
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