SkyscraperCity banner

161 - 173 of 173 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,556 Posts
good news from the messanger

Trust bid falls flat

Chantelle Kroehn

18Mar08


MORE than 80 years of history was erased from the Port waterfront this week as the first of the historic Jenkins St boatsheds were demolished.
The old Lawrie Diving and Marine shed and Bill Porter's sheds four structures in all dating back to the 1920s are gone.

The land to the west of the Birkenhead Bridge is being cleared in preparation for a future stage Newport Quays development.

A last-minute bid by the National Trust to heritage list these sheds and save them from the bulldozers was too late.

However, the Trust will continue in its bid to save the remaining few sheds on the riverfront strip.

Port of Adelaide National Trust chairman Tony Kearney said he was disappointed some of the sheds were gone.

``It's a loss of some of the important history of the Port, a part of Port's history that cannot be replaced,'' he said.

``The boatyards have been there in one way or another for 170 years.''

The occupants of the neighbouring Searle's Boatyards and McFarlane's Boatyards have been told they must leave by June 30.

Those sheds are then set to be demolished in the second half of the year.

Mr Kearney said the boatyards were part of the Port's unique charm.

``Without the sheds, it will be a very sterile, sanitised environment.

``With a bit of imagination and goodwill, the State Government could save one or two of the sheds,'' Mr Kearney said.

The Land Management Corporation has previously stated it is restoring historic buildings in Fletcher's Slipway.

The National Trust last month applied for both State and Local Heritage listing for the sheds in the hope one or both would be granted and demolition works would immediately stop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,604 Posts
Dolphins often come up the Port River, even past the Birkenhead Bridge. Just imagine whats at the bottom of the Port River, after 150 years of industrial waste. I must admit the water colour is already much better than 5 years ago, I reckon.
I wonder how the bridge is going, hopefully no more problems
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,231 Posts
You think thats bad, our rivers used to run orange before the clean air act. And reduction of toxic waste into rivers. Out steelworks pumped some shocking chemicals and compounds into rivers. Nothing lived in them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,604 Posts
You think thats bad, our rivers used to run orange before the clean air act. And reduction of toxic waste into rivers. Out steelworks pumped some shocking chemicals and compounds into rivers. Nothing lived in them.
haha, your part of the world invented industrialisation, so I guess a few bits of pollution may have gone into the midlands river systems over the years
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,231 Posts
haha ive only seen pictures of what they used to be like in the 60's and 50's and its horrifying. The river don and the sheaf are the giggest through sheffield and theyre just brown now but at least theres life in and around them. The river don collects some iron from an old waste metal tip thats buried under deepcar common about 8 miles out of sheffield thats clearly visiable in little tributaries that come from deepcar, all teh grass round the water is stained bright orange.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,556 Posts
Pretty exciting news, potentially our new tallest building in Adelaide (outside the CBD).

Tower, shops added to port plan

ANTIMO IANELLA
May 30, 2008 07:30pm
A 14-STOREY tower is among four apartment buildings in the revised design for the next stage of the $2 billion Newport Quays development.

The third stage of the Port Adelaide waterfront redevelopment project, worth $300 million, will feature about 500 homes – up from 421 in the previous design – and 100 marina berths.

The three 12-storey towers in the original design have been reduced to seven and nine storeys in height.

A high-density, 14-storey "iconic" building has been added. The new proposal also includes more cafe, dining and retail space, improved environmental features and a greater focus on the Port's heritage.

The amended plans were lodged with the Development Assessment Commission yesterday.

Newport Quays spokesman Todd Brown said the new design took into account concerns raised about the original proposal.

"We have spent a lot of time making sure we got it right," Mr Brown said.

"We think the new design is going to leave a great legacy for Port Adelaide and South Australia. It's stunning."

The Newport Quays consortium, made up of developers Urban Construct and Multiplex Living, have reworked the original proposal following criticism from Port Adelaide Enfield Council, residents and the National Trust over the size and scale of the project.

The new design will be released to the public soon and a decision is expected in about 10 weeks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
Government denies shelving Newport Quays project to appease voters

Premier Jay Weatherill at Port Adelaide with Newport Quays in the background.

THE Newport Quays developer has accused the State Government in court documents of shelving its $2 billion Port Adelaide development to help it win the coming by-election in the seat of former state treasurer Kevin Foley.
The Newport Quays consortium also says it has a right to "unlimited damages" because the Government's Land Management Corporation terminated its development in a "capricious or bad faith manner".

Premier Jay Weatherill announced the Government was stripping the consortium of its development rights for Port Adelaide on October 31, while denying the timing had anything to do with the looming by-election.

Mr Weatherill said at the time the Newport Quays development had been stalled for about three years and there was a need to reinvigorate Port Adelaide.

The Government now intends to develop a new masterplan for the Port, in a process which could involve numerous developers and take up to 18 months.

The Newport Quays consortium says it was given no warning of the Government's change of heart.

The Government has offered development consortium members Urban Construct and Multiplex $5.9 million in compensation; however, it is understood a damages figure in the hundreds of millions is being sought.

Newport Quays has so far built two sections of the development, which could have covered as much as 50ha, but much of the proposed project remains undeveloped due to environmental issues and planning delays.

As many as nine development precincts were to be constructed over 14 years.

Urban Construct chief executive Todd Brown says in his affidavit to the Supreme Court that shutting down the development was politically motivated.

"I am personally aware from my dealings in connection with the Newport Quays Project that there is a groundswell of constituents in Mr Foley's electorate who are not happy with the scale of the ... project," he said.

"It might be inferred that termination of the ... agreement is intended to appease disaffected Labor voters in Mr Foley's electorate in order to enhance the prospects of a new Labor candidate succeeding at the forthcoming by-election."

Support for Labor within the seat of Port Adelaide has jumped from 37 per cent in September - before the announcement was made by Mr Weatherill - to 48 per cent across all voters last week, according to polls run by The Advertiser, making a Labor win at the by-election next month all but assured.

In the Port Adelaide electorate the Newport Quays development excited the opposition of some community members, who saw it as responsible for eroding the heritage value of the area.

This, among other issues, led to Mr Foley's seat experiencing a 13.4 per cent swing to the Liberals at the last election, although he still held the seat by 12.8 per cent on a two-party-preferred basis.

Mr Brown said the consort- ium had not even been given a reason for the termination of the development agreement. "If there was a valid reason, I would expect LMC to have no misgivings about disclosing it to the consortium," he said.

Mr Brown also said the LMC had made no public statement about the issue, leaving that to the Government.

"The inference is that the true reason for the termination is political."

Mr Brown also alleges:

THE consortium was never told about concerns about the risk of explosion at the Incitec Pivot plant near the development and would have reconsidered the entire project if it had.

THE consortium was never told that the agreement may be terminated, or even that there were "misgivings" about it.

THE failure of the Government to live up to a commitment to deal with emissions from the nearby Adelaide Brighton cement plant is a key reason the project was stalled.

Mr Brown said the consortium may also pursue Urban Development Minister Patrick Conlon.

A spokesman for the Government said it "rejects all the allegations in the Newport Quays claim, and is defending the proceedings accordingly".

"The assertion that the termination of the agreement was effected in order to influence a by-election is ridiculous and offensive."

Mr Brown did not respond to The Advertiser's interview request.



http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/government-denies-shelving-newport-quays-project-to-appease-voters/story-e6frea6u-1226251785805
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,556 Posts
Beachside Semaphore just down the road, is undergoing a decent rejuvenation at the moment while Port Adelaide has simply stagnated yet again. PA has the potential, it just needs the investment and the right vision.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
Port locals to devise future plan

Artist's impression of the three-storey Dock One townhouses set for the Newport Quays development at Port Adelaide, SA.

A STEERING committee to guide the redevelopment of Port Adelaide has been established to ensure the community has a say about the plans.
The new committee will be chaired by Peter Bicknell, who has had extensive policy development in areas such as housing, employment, children's services, health and environment.

Other members of the committee include industrial designer Tom Kearney, Port Adelaide businesswoman Cath Duncan, maritime artist John Ford, Largs Bay resident and Port Adelaide Residents Environment Protection Group member Caren Siegfriedt, Michael O'Brien from the Aboriginal Advisory Panel, and local businessman Bruce McFarlane, who is also involved with the Port Adelaide Magpies Football Club.

The committee will provide advice to the State Government about the development of a master plan that will guide the future development of Port Adelaide.

In October last year, the Government terminated a development agreement with Newport Quays to adopt a new approach to revitalising Port Adelaide. "We want to make the Port a place people want to be - and there's nobody better to guide that than passionate locals who already live and work there," Premier Jay Weatherill said.

He said about 50 people had applied to be on the steering committee.

Mr Weatherill said that under the terms of reference, the committee would report to Housing and Urban Development Minister Patrick Conlon and the deputy chief executive of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure John Hanlon.

"The committee will be responsible for reviewing and providing guidance on the communications and community engagement plan, monitoring progress in the implementation of the community engagement strategy and providing feedback on draft plans," Mr Weatherill said.

http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/port-locals-to-devise-future-plan/story-e6frea83-1226332159856
 
161 - 173 of 173 Posts
Top