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From what you're saying, you would not only have to build stations 1.6 km apart, but you would have to have to build a dense network of parallel metro lines 1.6 km apart to achieve saturation walking distance coverage.
We get close to that all ready south west of the CBD with the inner west, Bankstown, East Hills and Illawarra lines being within 2 - 3km apart till we get further out
 

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Perpetual Bohemian
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We get close to that all ready south west of the CBD with the inner west, Bankstown, East Hills and Illawarra lines being within 2 - 3km apart till we get further out
Yes, that's what they did a century and more ago when it didn't cost so much (particularly stations). Paris metro is another example.
 

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Perpetual Bohemian
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Unfortunately the state govt seems to conceive of metro as a way of circumventing the existing system, and is opposed to any expansion of the Sydney Trains network, even when this makes perfect sense (e.g. the SWRL extension).
Yes, it's a - fortunate - fait accompli, so not much point having an academic debate about it. Commuters will be the beneficiaries with quicker journeys, greater capacity, better coverage and more reliability. That's the most important thing. Incidentally, you don't have to space stations wider to get higher commercial speeds, you just improve train performance.
 

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Yes, that's what they did a century and more ago when it didn't cost so much (particularly stations). Paris metro is another example.
Also the new stations on the west metro at Five Dock and North Burwood are around 2km or less from the western line
A station at Leichhardt North would have been around 2km from Petersham
Same with Camellia and Parramatta/Harris Park/Granville
 

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Yes, it's a - fortunate - fait accompli, so not much point having an academic debate about it. Commuters will be the beneficiaries with quicker journeys, greater capacity, better coverage and more reliability. That's the most important thing. Incidentally, you don't have to space stations wider to get higher commercial speeds, you just improve train performance.
1. It's not academic, since even if the ship has sailed on Metro West, it's worth having this discussion with regard to other lines. It may also be worth looking into how viable it is to retrofit in-fill stations on pre-existing underground lines (my sense, though, is that it's not very viable, hence why it's important to get it right the first time around).
2. SOME commuters will have almost imperceptibly faster journeys (by less than a minute for every missed station opportunity), while other commuters will have massively slower/longer journeys. There are the residents living near missed stations, who will need to take feeder buses (or just drive, as many of them probably will), not to mention the residents who could have been housed in places like Camellia/Silverwater, but who will instead end up living in places like Narellan, which are much more car-dependent and where commutes are much longer.
3. Yes, agreed that optimising train performance is a better way to get higher speeds than cutting out stations. That's precisely my argument!
 

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Perpetual Bohemian
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And how many buses were fully Aus manufactured.
Buses are obviously a little more complex. I think with any of those vehicles and boats the criterion would be "predominantly" Australian-manufactured because with all of them some components come from overseas, particularly driveline components (whether combustion-engined or electric). I think we make very little, if any, propulsion stuff in Australia any longer. So an Australian-manufactured bus should have its chassis and body manufactured in Australia, but in reality it's mainly body only because the chassis is imported with its propulsion gear on board. So most of our buses would be 50/50 Australian/imported. The only bus builders as far as I know using unitary construction are Custom Denning and Bustech and, in both cases, only in a minority of their output. However, Custom Denning may be about to become big with its new electric bus, Element, in which basically only the electronics are imported (French).

If Labor was being honest with that chart, they should have included the Labor administration 2005-2011 with a Chinese flag beside the Australian for trains. Gladys' international display should include Australian and Chinese flags with the buses and an Indian flag with the trains.
 
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Here we go again
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They should be funnelling their energy into restarting the manufacturing industry in Australia. Otherwise they should shut up when budgets for projects go even more sky high when ordering locally
 

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And as for those 'Malaysian' BYD/Gemilang buses.

Latest buses is being fully bodied in NSW

And the Aussie sub is now fully Australian owned
 

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WARREN
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Anybody else noticed that more people are getting tired of the restrictions on public transport in Sydney? I caught a train to Campbelltown yesterday and was surprised how many were not wearing masks on it.

There's generally far more compliance on the Western line than what I saw down there.

In other news, the other day I had a C set turn up on the T2 Leppington line on my service in the middle of the day. Nice train for a gunzel to ride on, with the loud traction noises they make, but from a commuter's perspective, those seats ain't gonna be missed.



They're also probably not going to be missed from a timetabling perspective, being the slowest train in the fleet that all of the timetables on sector 2 have to be designed around.
 

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Anybody else noticed that more people are getting tired of the restrictions on public transport in Sydney? I caught a train to Campbelltown yesterday and was surprised how many were not wearing masks on it.

There's generally far more compliance on the Western line than what I saw down there.

In other news, the other day I had a C set turn up on the T2 Leppington line on my service in the middle of the day. Nice train for a gunzel to ride on, with the loud traction noises they make, but from a commuter's perspective, those seats ain't gonna be missed.



They're also probably not going to be missed from a timetabling perspective, being the slowest train in the fleet that all of the timetables on sector 2 have to be designed around.
you're right, no mask wearing on that train.
 

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WARREN
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you're right, no mask wearing on that train.
They all saw those beautiful C set seats and waited for the next one.

I bet only the most hardcore gunzel would want a C set seat for their lounge room.
 

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Perpetual Bohemian
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And as for those 'Malaysian' BYD/Gemilang buses.

Latest buses is being fully bodied in NSW
And the Aussie sub is now fully Australian owned
Yes, Gemilang Australia is an Australian company using the Malaysian company's brand name. Their local bus bodies are being built in Ballarat Vic and Glendenning NSW. All their buses including electric buses are "50/50s" - only the body is built here, on an imported chassis and drive train. The electric bus chassis is BYD from China. Most other local electric buses so far are being built on imported BYD chassis and drivetrain. The other Chinese brand of electric bus is Yutong which is fully imported (as is BCI, which has a factory in China, too).

During this year, two fully low-floor electric buses will hit the market: the previously-mentioned completely locally-built Custom Denning Element (with French electronics) and, for Perth, a local Volgren bodied Volvo chassis imported from Europe.
 

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In other news, the other day I had a C set turn up on the T2 Leppington line on my service in the middle of the day. Nice train for a gunzel to ride on, with the loud traction noises they make, but from a commuter's perspective, those seats ain't gonna be missed.
So this second order of 17 B sets, is for replacement of the 7 C-Set consists, plus 10 extra for the additional T4 services that will be enabled once the South Coast trains are on the Illawarra Locals into ST.

Of course the T4 increases would be fulfilled by Tangaras cascaded away from T1/T9, which would be backfilled by the 10 B sets (and/or A's swapped from Sector 2, but you get the picture).

But since that's a couple of years away, I'd say as these B's come into service, after all the C's are gone we'll probably see up to 10 of the K consists put into storage then brought back out onto Sector 2 once this above-mentioned cascading is ready to happen.

Although that depends on whether the Oscars are ready to cascade over to suburban use by then, which of course spells the retirement of the K's altogether.
 
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