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Sydney: World's best city
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm not happy with the rubbish and hooplah being posted in the Far North Coast thread.

There is only one city in that region where highrise is actually being built - Tweed Heads and anything I post on projects gets lost amongst everything else.

RECENTLY COMPLETED TOWERS

Tweed Ultima





Harbour Tower - Twin Towns Resort





A new apartment complex for 24-28 Thompson St, Tweed Heads. Just minutes walk to Coolangatta Beach.





8/9 Sands St



Coming Soon, Bay Grand (proposed)
Silverstone at 22 Thomson St. Apartments from $470 000



This looks recent - 10 McGregor Cresent



13 Eden St
A top floor apartment is going for $2.75 million.



[/img]http://www.realestate.com.au/objects/props/8516/105358516al1229916630.jpg[/img]





5-9 Ivory Cresent



Across the road at number six



Neilsen on the Park - 24 Boundary St



Circular Vue (20 Hill St)



2-3 Boundary Lane



Two recent announcements

1. A D/A for 4 Endeavour Pde, Tweed Heads (Behind Centro Tweed) has been lodged with planning NSW - http://majorprojects.planning.nsw.gov.au/index.pl?action=view_job&job_id=3220
Looks to be highrise.

2. Jack Evans Boat Harbour project for Tweed Heads. Parklands will get a big upgrade.

http://www.tweed.nsw.gov.au/pdfs/Bay Street Information Pack.pdf

KINGSCLIFF

Mantra Resort. The hotel component has been well promoted on Sydney Weekender.





Peppers



Nice unit block (Address not listed)



Expect to fork out $1 million for a unit at 264 Marine Pde

 

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Walking Leather Boots
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Thank you fabian, i think the mods should deleate that stupid north coast thread for good

Nice to see something new for a change, haven't been in a while very nice pics
 

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the tweed coast is growing pretty fast, they pretty much built a new town there in the last 7 years called casurina,
and salt also some nice projects in tweed with plenty more to come an more potential with the cbd undergoing a major makeover, tweed heads in only 20min from where im living so i can post update photos in here pretty easely,
 

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Walking Leather Boots
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Actually it will be safer option to delete and ban you instead of my thread thank you very much dickhead.
I demand this be deleated as it is a personal insult to myself and while your at it deleate the far north coast thread as all the worthy news ever psoted their is now here

havanicedai
 

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(Sorry, Fabian, the disease has spread.)

A very interesting post none-the-less, as I had no idea so much was going on up at Tweed Heads. A couple of the buildings are not bad at all.
 

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Is it really bothering you so much that you want to punch him untill you kill him?

Edit:
Great job, Fabian. I never thought that Tweed would of got that tall, with the airport and all. Thanks heaps :)
 

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Wow! That's not bad.

A.R.Note: that'd be '****'s sake' fyi. But you're right, Pat, it makes C.P look a bit sloppy and distracts you from what he's saying.
 

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Sydney: World's best city
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This should make project approvals alot easier with a planning panel to be established by the Tweed Valley Council. There is too much redtape up there.

From Tweed Daily News

Planning panel pair appointed
Peter Caton | 1st July 2009

Print larger | smaller
Joan van Lieshout
TWEED councillors yesterday appointed two Queensland-employed “experts” to make future decisions on major developments.

The councillors appointed Bond University lecturer in urban planning, assistant professor Ned Wales and Brisbane barrister Robert Quirk, son of Tweed Canegrowers' president Robert Quirk, to a Government-dominated planning panel of five which is due to be officially declared today.

The panel is to make decisions on major developments such as high-rise buildings, shopping centres and subdivisions, taking over a role traditionally held by elected councillors.

As a back-up panel member to replace either appointee, the councillors chose engineer Steven Grimes, the development manager of the Queensland Government's Urban Land Development Authority which was set up to sell off government land considered surplus to needs.

Although they all have homes here, none has a high public profile on the Tweed.

Late yesterday Dr Wales was unavailable for comment and Mr Quirk said he wanted to wait for confirmation about his appointment from the Council before making any comment.

Mr Grimes could not be contacted.

None of the 10 candidates for the positions stayed after a midday interview session to attend the council meeting which made the decision shortly after 2.30pm.

Some did not even turn up in person for the interviews held in a room adjacent to the office of Mayor Joan van Lieshout. Instead it is understood they were granted “tele-conference” interviews with councillors.

The three applicants were selected after a brief debate in which Greens Party councillor Katie Milne trying unsuccessfully to have former Greens councillor Henry James appointed to the third, back-up, position.

“Henry James is an outstanding candidate. I do believe if he had run for council this time... he would have been elected mayor,” she said. “I find it difficult to have Mr Steven Grimes on the panel.

“He is very much associated with the development side of things,”Cr Mile said.

A bid by Cr Kevin Skinner and Cr Phil Younbgblutt to appoint former council general manager Dr John Griffin to the third spot also failed.

Backing Messrs Wales, Quirk and Grimes, Mayor Joan van Liehsout said: “They are all fully qualified and I would like to see something fresh in the shire.”

The decision came despite almost half the other councils in NSW, including neighbouring Byron Shire, refusing to nominate members to the new government planning panels due to be officially set up toda
 

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good news thanks for posting,
good to see some people in council have there heads screwed on properly and are thinking about future infrastructure.
 

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Sydney: World's best city
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Changes to planning laws at State Level could mean taller buildings for the entire region..

This recent photo by Broadie shows the impact of this limit. Tall buildings in this part of Tweed Heads would be good. Wont harm anyone and it's in the town centre.



From Tweed Daily News

Councils losing power
Peter Caton | 13th July 2009

Print larger | smallerTHREE-storey height limits along the Tweed Coast could be the next victim of State Government plans to gradually strip local councils of planning powers.

A move towards more centralised planning control in New South Wales, which has already been marked by government-dominated planning panels set up to consider major developments, is also about to restrict the powers of councils in setting other rules controlling development.

Some Tweed councillors even fear they might lose their power to decide on land-use zonings, with the government insisting all councils follow “templates” for their major planning documents, known as local environment plans.

Former Tweed mayor Warren Polglase said the templates would set out what can and cannot happen and that would be it.

He warned that could push aside policies outlined in the council's local development control plans (DCPs), which include height restrictions.

Last month Greens Party councillor Katie Milne warned that the council's refusal to insist the state government abide by the three-storey height limit at Cabarita Beach in considering a retail and residential complex, including a Woolworths supermarket, could set a precedent.

The DCPs were not a legal document and the new local environment plan templates could result in new high-density areas along the Tweed Coast, Cr Polglase said.

“Because the cost of infrastructure is enormous, the government is trying to consolidate high-density areas,” he said. “This could include high-rise, whereas the community attitude is 'we don't want them'.

“DCPs are not a legal document, only a recognition of what the community wants.

“We are slowly losing community input into where we want our town to go.”

However, one of the council's senior planners, Iain Lonsdale, said the new “standard instrument” - the templated LEP - allowed for 34 land-use zones and it was open to local councils to use as many of them as necessary to meet local land-use planning requirements.

The local council would then be able to determine the appropriate full range of permitted or prohibited land-uses in each zone, based on the prescribed zone objective and any additional objective added by the council, Mr Lonsdale said.

“The ability of local councils to determine and regulate the land-uses is therefore largely unchanged, save for those prescribed by the standard instrument.”
 

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Sydney: World's best city
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The mayor wants more development...

From The Gold Coast Bulletin

Polglase to push Tweed development
Ben Dillaway | September 17th, 2009

A DOSE of development is what the Tweed's new mayor has ordered to get the shire into shape.

Warren Polglase, who became mayor for the third time after his name was drawn from a cardboard box during an extraordinary meeting this week, said his focus would be creating jobs through development.

"The Tweed relies on activity in the building trade and we've got some major projects down the line like Cobaki Lakes and Kings Forest," he said.

"We've got to get those moving along pretty quick so they can get their land released and get people interested.

"Just look at Casuarina and Salt. Look at what that achieved when that got going."

Cr Polglase, who was mayor from 2001 until the council was sacked in 2005, said he would work hard to lure development to the Tweed.

"If people want to come to Tweed with a few dollars in their pocket and want to create something, our door is open to make that happen," he said.

"We need to get it happening ASAP, we need to attract people to the Tweed with employment opportunities.''

He said the Tweed was well placed to cope with an increase in population.

"We've got the water capacity to cope with another 40,000 and we're looking at raising the wall of the Clarrie Hall Dam," he said.


The council was sacked and replaced by administrators in 2005 after a report by Professor Maurice Daly raised concerns about council dealings with property developers.

Despite the report later being largely discredited and parts nullified by the NSW Supreme Court, it still tainted the image of pro-developer candidates.

Cr Polglase believes none of the mud has stuck.

"The recommendations were made, they were put forward to various government departments and not one of them has been enacted," he said.

"That was four years ago now, coming on five. What does that say about the inquiry? The inquiry loses its integrity when that sort of thing happens."

The new mayor said it was a 'reward' to be leading the shire again.

"I've always had a passion to be involved in community activities and deliver outcomes," he said.

With a 12-month term in front of him, Cr Polglase called on the divided council to unite.

"I just hope the council can come together and all have a common good and common goal so we can create outcomes for the Tweed the community expect us to deliver," he said.
 

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Sydney: World's best city
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Lots of activity but where are the skyscrapers???

From The Gold Coast Bulletin

Tweed development surges
| October 10th, 2009

CONSTRUCTION activity in the Tweed is pushing ahead at an unprecedented level, with major planned projects accounting for a significant percentage of the $11.75 billion of development pinpointed in the region, new research from Colliers International shows.

The Tweed Development Map, compiled by Colliers Gold Coast research manager Lynda Campbell, found while $3.4 billion of development was under way, there was a further $8.3 billion worth of projects in the planning stages.

Ms Campbell said the Tweed was one of the few areas in the Gold Coast-northern NSW region to have recorded an increase in development activity over the past year, with the figure a $2 billion increase on the $9.66 billion of projects in 2008.

She said it was also one of the few to have a significant pipeline of new development on the horizon.

The research included major residential, mixed-use, infrastructure, commercial, apartment and retirement projects valued at more than $5 million in Tweed Heads, Banora Point, Bilambil, Terranora, Kingscliff, Casuarina, Murwillumbah and Pottsville.

Major planned projects include the mixed use $2.5 billion Cobaki Lakes at Cobaki, $2.25 billion Kings Forest at Cudgen, the $1.3 billion Rise at Terranora and the $750 million Seaside residential community.

There is already a significant amount of development under way, including the $1.5 billion Casuarina Beach, where plans for the Casuarina Town Centre are in the final stages of approval with the NSW Department of Planning, and the $1 billion Salt Village at Kingscliff.

Colliers Gold Coast director-in-charge Stewart Gilchrist said the Tweed had become one of the region's most active areas for development.

"It appears the high level of construction activity we have witnessed in this area over the past few years is not slowing down, with the momentum to continue for some time on the back of these major planned projects," he said.

"Mixed use development is leading the charge, accounting for $8.55 billion of the activity pinpointed or almost three-quarters of all projects in the pipeline or under way.


"As one of the fastest growing regions in Australia, this style of development is ideal for the area because it facilitates an expanding population by creating communities where there are also opportunities for work and recreation."

Ms Campbell said there was also a further $1.44 billion of residential projects, $260 million of apartment development and $151 million of retirement projects under way or planned.

"As such, the vast majority of development will be centred on creating new housing to accommodate the area's population growth," she said.

Ms Campbell said infrastructure commitments totalled $772 million, of which just one project was under way -- the $75 million expansion of the Bray Park Water Treatment Plant.

She said one of the most important planned infrastructure projects was a $310 million upgrade to the Pacific Highway at Banora Point.

"We have seen the positive benefits the Tugun bypass has had on the Tweed, by making the area more accessible to the Gold Coast and Brisbane," she said.

"An upgrade to the Pacific Highway at Banora Point, which would encompass improvements to the notorious Sexton Hill, would have a further positive influence on the area."

Other infrastructure commitments include an upgrade to a waste water treatment plant at Banora Point, Condong Co-Generation Power Plant and a Tweed Heads town centre masterplan.

Commercial development accounts for the remainder of development in the region, with eight projects identified totalling $579 million, the largest of which is the $350 million Industry Central industrial precinct at Murwillumbah.
 
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