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Discussion Starter #241
As opposed to being regimented, conservative and unimaginative for the sake of being regimented, conservative and unimaginative?
 

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Sydney needs its less dense areas to lift their fair share of the population growth. That is, suburbs within 10km of Sydney CBD where density is currently low have to allow more mid rise development, and become more dense. Our current approach of very low density boomer enclaves so close to the city, compensated for by pockets of very high density is bipolar and unproductive.
With all due respect, what I find unproductive and bordering on self-serving is the obsession with residents who have the privilege/luck of living so close to the job-rich regions of this city, attempting to tell the rest of us that fitting in more houses closer to where people work is bi-polar.

Once the metro opens, the Waterloo station precinct will be just one stop away from Central, three stops away from Martin Place and four stops away from Barangaroo. Each of these stops will deliver people to job-dense regions centred around tech, financial and professional service oriented industries. And you won’t even need a car.

The argument for allowing just mid-rise development across a 10km radius of the inner suburbs of Sydney consigns those inner-suburbs to becoming a monotone of uninspiring 7-10 storey buildings. What is worse, is that this argument seems to advocate for the destruction of historically significant suburbs of by-gone architectural eras – such as Woolloomoolloo, Glebe and Balmain. Even more tragic is that public transport cannot be delivered to all those suburbs in the same way that Waterloo will be blessedu – meaning a continued reliance on cars as a means of transport adding further to congestion.

I would much rather a more diverse housing stock, where low rise can still be an option, with high rise focused on key public transport –oriented precincts to house the workers of the future. High rise precincts such as those at Waterloo enables us to concentrate public transport options and reduce reliance on cars.
 

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As a local resident I have to say I find this really disappointing - I was looking forward to increased facilities and an activated, busy, urban neighbourhood, with late-night options for food and entertainment (sorely lacking in this area) but with CoS in charge I'm expecting years of public consultation and planning reviews to ultimately deliver a disappointing mish-mash of generic buildings to a much later time frame, and a sleepy, suburban atmosphere where everything is dead by 9pm.
 

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As a local resident I have to say I find this really disappointing - I was looking forward to increased facilities and an activated, busy, urban neighbourhood, with late-night options for food and entertainment (sorely lacking in this area) but with CoS in charge I'm expecting years of public consultation and planning reviews to ultimately deliver a disappointing mish-mash of generic buildings to a much later time frame, and a sleepy, suburban atmosphere where everything is dead by 9pm.
Yes there is one problem with the COS they take forever to do things and over consult with the public.
Green Square is not exactly exhilarating architecturally, for all the promises it just feels like everything else around there with a spattering of public buildings which are light relief to the developer driven dross.
 

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Discussion Starter #245
Developer driven dross? A bit haughty.

You do realise that most of those buildings, in CoS at least, are the result of council managed design competitions, processed at least 3 times by council planning, (preliminary work, Stage 1 DA, Stage 2 DA), the design competitions judged by reps from the developer, architects, government infrastructure and council, and all designed by established or rising architects?

The idea that developers alone are making the design decisions is too easy and too common.

Also it is easy is to denigrate 'as from on high' with sweeping statements.

Of course, not all buildings are architectural gems but to airily dismiss most as 'dross' is pretty arrogant and I wonder what is the basis of the judgement of folk who assume such a lofty architectural aesthetics position.

All are entitled to their opinion but basing that opinion on nothing but personal preference and ignorance is irresponsible though a common enough practice. So often the more adamant and negative the opinion, the least informed, least educated and least sensitive it is. And that, unfortunately holds in most spheres of life.

I wish people would inform themselves before gracing the world with their opinions. Just because you don't like it, doesn't mean it is 'dross', rather it means you are making some swingeing judgements based on the floss of personal opinion.
 

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I'm still reserving judgment on Green Square Town Centre - at least there are some architecturally interesting tall(ish) buildings, and it has the potential to be an active, late-night precinct, but I definitely agree that it has taken a long time to even get to this point and there seems to be endless public consultation, redesigns and planning delays.

The alternative Council plans for Waterloo Estate seem to be more conservative than Green Square, which is a concerning, given the potential for the area.
 

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Discussion Starter #248
Have to give the Town Centre more time to be completed and settled in to its role.
While council takes an inordinate amount of time assessing and reassessing and imposing its will and particular brand of ordinariness on architects' & developers' competition winning designs, you do have to keep in mind that it is not financially sensible or viable to build the whole town centre in one go over a couple of years. The time frame has always been to 2030.

It was in 2008 that a frustrated local wrote in the comments to yet another consultation: 'Stop consulting and just build the bloody thing!'
I could not have agreed more and yet, 11 years later and they are still consulting people who have very little understanding or knowledge but very strong opinions.

Unfortunately, WCTL, you are right: the council plan for Waterloo Estate is considerably more conservative than the ones for Green Square.

The original DCPs for the town centre and for the Lachlan Precinct were very conservative and council had to be pushed to more reasonable plans given the proximity to the CBD and the need for housing.

The council ignored advice re its conservative plans for the Ashmore Estate and as it becomes a reality the more evident it is that council's rigid height controls got it wrong. Despite several of the buildings being well designed the overall character is heavy.
 

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Discussion Starter #249
today 1pm
Dead centre between the 2 towers CoS wants to keep for its mediocre version of the Waterloo Estate, is the sloping roof of Dangrove Art Storage Centre on Mandible Street, Alexandria, which has just won 2 awards in the National Architecture Awards 2019:
- Commercial Architecture
- Interior Architecture

architect: Tzannes
 

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Discussion Starter #251
https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/three-high-rise-towers-approved-for-waterloo-rail-station-precinct-20191216-p53kit.html

Three high-rise towers approved for Waterloo rail station precinct

By Megan Gorrey
December 16, 2019 — 7.25pm

Warning: there seems to be serious confusion between Waterloo Metro Quarter (the 3 towers) and Waterloo Estate, the big plan.

The Berejiklian government is pushing ahead with plans to build up to 700 apartments above and around a new rail station at Waterloo in Sydney's inner south.

Planning Minister Rob Stokes has given the green light to the “Metro Quarter” proposal by the government’s UrbanGrowth Development Corporation and Sydney Metro, paving the way for three residential towers of 23, 25 and 29 storeys and four commercial buildings up to 10 storeys at the site.
............
Use link ^^ as my computer is having a nervous breakdown
 

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Discussion Starter #252



https://www.architectureanddesign.com.au/news/waterloo-metro-quarter-finally-gets-green-light?utm_source=IndustryNewsletterFacelift&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Industry_Newsletter_20191218&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWWpOa01qazJaak0xTXpGaCIsInQiOiJQV21YK0lTWURjZEVRSVU0bmVGOTV0Ujh6S2Q4aGIybGxmSEVieGxcL0lqbWtXWVBTZzgzYmo1bVlJOUx5dkNyUTd5UmZBeTNCWWgreFYxb0U5a1lPRldzZFwvTllSY2I2bHVRTFJsV3o5S2dwcVRJTGFhVXg3STMzXC9tSVJzNE5IaiJ9


Waterloo Metro quarter finally gets the green light

Edited by Branko Miletic

NSW Planning and Public Spaces minister Rob Stokes has announced Waterloo’s tri-tower design of homes, jobs and public space.

“Waterloo is already one of Sydney’s most-loved suburbs, with easy access to all of the things that make our city great and it’s going to get even better,” says Stokes.

“From the Aerotropolis to the CBD, we are transforming suburbs and empty spaces across Sydney into vibrant connected communities with a mixture of homes, jobs and great public places on the doorstep of world-class public transport.”

While the final mix of homes and jobs in the precinct will be decided during the detailed design stage, it could include either around 450 jobs and up to 700 homes or up to 1,800 jobs and 450 homes over three residential towers up to 29 storeys and four commercial towers up to 10 storeys.

The precinct will include 70 social housing apartments and at least five per cent of homes will be affordable housing. It will have two new public plazas at Cope and Raglan Streets, new community facilities, and tree-lined footpaths through the site.

Waterloo Metro Quarter is the latest development to be approved by the NSW Government after it promised to “clear the decks” of applications stuck in the system to ensure continued investment and job creation in NSW.

“These projects will inject more than $3.3 billion into our economy and create more than 14,000 new job opportunities across NSW,” he says.
 

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Discussion Starter #254
https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/mirvac-john-holland-to-develop-800m-waterloo-metro-station-project-20191219-p53let.html

Mirvac, John Holland to develop $800m Waterloo metro station project

By Carolyn Cummins
December 19, 2019 — 11.43am

Developer Mirvac and its joint-venture partner John Holland have won a tender to build the $800 million mixed-use Waterloo metro station in Sydney's inner south.

Under the plan, the consortium will construct the station, three towers and two mid-rise buildings above and adjacent to the station, which will form part of a $12.5 billion metro line running from Chatswood under Sydney Harbour to central Sydney and onto Bankstown.

The project is set to mark the revitalisation of the Waterloo precinct, which has been one of the last pieces of the puzzle for the redevelopment of the city's inner south.


Renders of Mirvac and John Holland's new Waterloo metro station and the integrated development above it.

The building costs for the contract are about $299 million and Mirvac will seek a 50/50 capital partner for its share of the project.

At least 5 per cent of the homes to be built as part of the project will be affordable housing and 70 apartments will be set aside for social housing. There will be new community facilities, retail and office space and two new public plazas at Cope Street and Raglan Street.

NSW Minister for Transport Andrew Constance said that as part of a value capture agreement, the NSW government will receive $106 million from the joint venture for the air rights to develop the site.

“This new station will transform the local area once it is complete, becoming a landmark in its own right,” he said.

Our vision for this precinct extends beyond the bricks and mortar.

Mirvac CEO Susan Lloyd-Hurwitz


Mirvac's chief executive Susan Lloyd-Hurwitz said Waterloo was a "once in a generation" opportunity to drive genuine social renewal.

"Our vision for this precinct extends beyond the bricks and mortar; we will be a long-term investor in Waterloo and we are wholly committed to realising the potential of this site to help drive meaningful social renewal and enduring value for the broader precinct," she said.

The Waterloo project comes amid news that Mirvac is also the front-runner to buy a $220 million land and apartment project at Willoughby in Sydney's north, which is the current home of the Nine Entertainment Co, the owner of this publication.

John Holland chief executive Joe Barr said Waterloo was a major milestone for his company. It is a double victory for John Holland which on Wednesday also won the contract to develop the $735 million Sydney Football Stadium at Sydney's Moore Park.

"This project will transform Waterloo and improve community spaces in the inner city for generations to come," Mr Barr said, adding that it would "make commuting easier, create jobs and improve community facilities."

Mirvac recently placed in the top 10 of the annual BDO survey, with the advisory group saying the company's total shareholder return was 49 per cent over one year and 71 per cent over three years, with an 8 per cent increase in net tangible asset per security to $2.50.

Mirvac shares were up 0.3 per cent at $3.21 in late afternoon trade.
 

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Discussion Starter #255 (Edited)
Would it be too much to hope the images are indicative only?

First impressions are not good, in fact, every building is different and not necessarily in a good way, and the whole appearance is visually chaotic as though each building had a different architect* and there was no communication or co-ordination.

Pls. let it be 'concept only'.

* They did! 4 architectural firms worked on the station and the buildings...and it looks like it. Why would it be so wrong that there is some visual coherence between the buildings as they are part of a larger scheme and not single, one-off sites?
 

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The pictures again dripping in fake greenery that will never ever actually eventuate. Why do they do this?

I think it looks alright, I would like to see though another entrance to the station on the corner of Wellington and Cope streets, so that there is better access. Why they would put the station box about as close to Redfern station as they possibly could have whilst still being in Waterloo, and then placed the entrance at the very most northern end only, escapes me. A huge part of the redeveloped estate, in fact mostly all of it, will be south of the station, and yet there is no station entry on the southern side. Odd to say the least
 

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ARCHITECTURE AU has different information:

https://architectureau.com/articles/waterloo-over-station-development-approved/

The NSW government has approved a concept proposal for an over-station development that includes three residential towers of up to 29 storeys and four commercial towers of up to 10 storeys above and surrounding Waterloo Station in inner Sydney.

A concept development application with drawings prepared by Turner and Turf Design was submitted for the development of the Waterloo Metro Quarter precinct in November 2018. The site is bound by Botany Road and Raglan, Cope and Wellington Streets. The Design Guidelines indicated that a lead architect would be responsible for the design of the station, ground plane, podium levels and any buildings immediately above the station while at least three other architects will be engaged to design the taller towers and a proposed community building.

Waterloo is a new station in the Sydney Metro network and together with the planned mixed-used development around the station, the government hopes it will be a “key catalyst” for the area and for the adjacent Waterloo Estate.

The precise details of the development would be decided during the detailed design process, but could include around 700 dwellings and commercial space for 450 workers, or 450 homes. The precinct will contain 70 social housing dwellings.

It will also include retail and entertainment space, recreational facilities and at least 2,000 square metres for community uses.

“The integrated station development will create a vibrant, mixed use local centre that serves as the gateway to the Waterloo Precinct and caters to the needs of the Metro Quarter, Waterloo Estate and metro customers,” the Design Guidelines statement read.

“The built form and public domain will distinctively reflect the local character and respond to place and its context and deliver high quality architecture.”

Among the strategies employed to achieve this will be to create a pair of plazas adjacent to the station entry, with one north-facing plaza along Raglan Street and another along Cope Street that engages with the Waterloo Estate and the Waterloo Congregational Church.

Rob Stokes, NSW planning minister, said in a statement, “Waterloo is already one of Sydney’s most-loved suburbs, with easy access to all of the things that make our city great and it’s going to get even better.”
 

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Discussion Starter #259
Checked the website and there are no images of the buildings even though it was updated on 17 dec.

From the website:

Main station features
The new metro station at Waterloo will revitalise the Waterloo precinct, and support the extension of the CBD.

The new station will take pressure off Redfern and Green Square stations, and provide a new fast, safe and reliable metro rail link to key employment areas in the Sydney central business district, North Sydney and Barangaroo.

It will contribute to the NSW Government’s objective to transform Waterloo and Redfern and will provide additional connectivity to the Australian Technology Park.

With high quality bus services along Botany Road, it will allow for further development and expansion of the Global Economic Corridor between Sydney CBD and Green Square.

The station includes:

  • New pedestrian crossings on Raglan and Cope streets
  • New taxi bays on Raglan Street
  • New bike parking within the precinct
  • New kiss and ride bays on Cope Street
  • Existing bus stops retained northbound along Botany Road
  • Relocation of the bus stop southbound on Botany Road closer to Raglan Street
  • Relocation of the bus stop on Cope Street to Wellington Street
  • Enhancement of pedestrian infrastructure around the Metro Quarter including footpath widenings and through-site links.
  • Access and entry
  • Station access and entry is via Corner of Raglan and Cope streets and from the public plaza off Cope Street.
Location
The Metro Quarter is bounded by Botany Road, Cope Street, Raglan Street and Wellington Street in Waterloo.

Indicative travel time (from 2024):
  • 2 minutes to Central Station
  • 6 minutes to Sydney Metro’s Martin Place Station
  • 8 minutes to Barangaroo Station.

Station construction

Construction activities include:
  • Removing spoil
  • Excavating the station
  • Constructing the station.
 

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Discussion Starter #260
The final planning controls include:

  • Increase the maximum building heights from 12m (3-4 storeys) and 15m (4-5 storeys) to a maximum height of RL 116.9m* (29 storeys), stepping down to RL104.2 (25 storeys) and RL 96.9 (23 storeys)
  • Increase the maximum floor space ratio from 1.75:1 to 6.0:1 across the site
  • Introduce a clause which requires that a minimum of 12,000sqm of gross floor area is used for non-residential land uses including 2,000sqm of floor space for community facilities, and 2,200sqm of publicly accessible open space
  • Introduce a requirement for 5% of the total residential floor area to be dedicated as affordable housing in perpetuity
  • Introduce a clause for the consent authority to make guidelines relating to the design and amenity of the Waterloo Metro Quarter
  • Introduce a satisfactory arrangements clause for the provision of designated State public infrastructure for residential land use
  • Introduce a Design Excellence clause to ensure best-practice design, including an exclusion from a 10% floorspace bonus applicable under the existing clause in the SLEP 2012
  • Introduce maximum car parking provisions for residential and commercial uses on the site
  • Introduce Active Street Frontage provisions to promote uses that attract pedestrian activity along ground floor street frontages along Botany Road, Wellington Street, Cope Street and Raglan Street.
* The ground level is somewhere around 20m +/- which would give the 29 storey tower a height above street level of around 95m. which is similar to Ovo Tower [96m] at the Green Square Town Centre and the 20 Gadigal Tower [93m] in Victoria Park, Zetland.
 
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