SkyscraperCity banner

261 - 280 of 288 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,887 Posts
Discussion Starter #263


https://www.architectureanddesign.com.au/news/john-mcaslan-partners-woods-bagot-to-design-new-wa?utm_source=IndustryNewsletterFacelift&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Industry_Newsletter_20191223&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWmpsa01ESTVORFpsWlRZNCIsInQiOiJ4QkNjSmFsc3A1UVVPck5NWEFCeVNpYjZlUTJ6YmFGMkNpZ3VvR2dPdnFuRWhmZEwrbGRcL0hxOXJMdlM4bnpDRHdPbHcxWWFZamtsTmQrU3U0RTMxWUgzSUNEUkthXC9XbUVsczhzY0JNSDBDVTlZRUQ2OVliRFJYdFlpMVY3MURpIn0=


John McAslan + Partners & Woods Bagot to design new Waterloo Station

Edited by Branko Miletic

John McAslan + Partners and Woods Bagot will be the architects of the new Sydney Metro Waterloo Station.

Located at the heart of the urban renewal scheme, John McAslan + Partners' Sydney lead Troy Uleman says: “The district of Waterloo is a dynamic, multicultural urban context, rich and varied in history and demographics. Waterloo Station will be the impetus behind the development of the wider area. The station will form a new gateway to the precinct and it’s critical that it has a strong Waterloo identity.”

John McAslan + Partners says that the design is “deeply grounded in the context of place, connecting to the rich history of the inner-city suburb to reflect the identity of Waterloo today.”



“The design’s materiality and form are directly influenced by the area’s distinctive local vernacular, and the site’s rich history, geology and context. Natural light will be filtered into the below-ground station by a network of skylights, providing a welcoming environment and a sense of spatial permeability. Integrated public art to will also add a further layer of interpretation of local context,” the firm says.

“Our design approach is to create a vibrant and dynamic station with a strong and recognisable local identity, that will be the catalyst for regeneration in the local area. The Integrated Station Development will be key to unlocking opportunities and providing better connections both locally and to the wider city,” says Uleman.

Images: Supplied
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
Looks like existing towers will remain. Disappointing outcome:

Waterloo Estate development in Sydney
Waterloo Estate development in Sydney


Plans for the mega Waterloo Estate in Sydney have almost halved the number of new dwellings, cut building heights and increased public space. The NSW Land and Housing Corporation has also added an extra 100 social housing units into the area.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
The twin towers are iconic to the skyline. Tho I agree there is a sad history for some of its occupants over the years, I am happy to see them retained in the proposal and hopefully refurbished for its residents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,500 Posts
Some more info
Waterloo Estate dwellings slashed, social housing increased
may 31 Daily telegraph
A year later the updated plans for the Waterloo Estate near Redfern have been dramatically dialled down in an effort to win wider community support and get the project moving.

In the latest large scale project aimed at breaking up Sydney’s public housing ghettos, the NSW Land and Housing Corporation’s updated planning proposal for the site has seen eight storeys chopped off the tallest towers, wider streets and a 4000sq m increase in open space.

But in the face of criticism that too many public housing tenants are being pushed out of the city, The Sunday Telegraph can reveal the state government has added more taxpayer-funded units to the project.
Housing Minister Melinda Pavey said the new proposal includes the development of about 3000 new properties in the first stage, with 30 per cent of the homes social housing.
Buildings have been cut from 40 to 32 storeys — still a long way from the City of Sydney’s desire for 13 storeys maximum.

There has also been a reduction in the total dwellings in the project, down from about 7000 to 6200.
The government is now proposing 2.57ha of open space in the area, which includes a signature park adjacent to the new Metro Station.

Over the life of the Waterloo South Project it’s expected there will be about 6600 jobs created.

The council is still assessing the proposal.
The government estimates the project will start in 2022-2023, depending on planning approval.


from COS website - may 29
Planning proposal – Waterloo south (May 29)

The NSW Land and Housing Corporation has submitted a planning proposal request to change the planning controls
that apply to the southern portion of the Waterloo estate (Waterloo south).

Waterloo south includes land bounded by Cope, Raglan, George, Wellington, Gibson, Kellick, Pitt and McEvoy streets, and has an approximate site area of 12.32 hectares (approximately 65% of the total estate).


It currently comprises 749 social housing dwellings owned by NSW Land and Housing Corporation, 125 privately owned dwellings, and some commercial properties on the south-east corner of Cope and Wellington streets.

LINK .. Waterloo South Planning Proposal
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Plans for the mega Waterloo Estate in Sydney have slashed the number of new dwellings, cut building heights and increased public space. The NSW Land and Housing Corporation ha...
Waterloo Estate dwellings slashed, social housing increased

It is the suburban mega city that was originally dubbed a “planning disaster” by Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore.
A year later the updated plans for the Waterloo Estate near Redfern have been dramatically dialled down in an effort to win wider community support and get the project moving.
Updated plans for the Waterloo Estate.
Updated plans for the Waterloo Estate.
In the latest large scale project aimed at breaking up Sydney’s public housing ghettos, the NSW Land and Housing Corporation’s updated planning proposal for the site has seen eight storeys chopped off the tallest towers, wider streets and a 4000sq m increase in open space.

But in the face of criticism that too many public housing tenants are being pushed out of the city, The Sunday Telegraph can reveal the state government has added more taxpayer-funded units to the project.
Water, Property and Housing Minister Melinda Pavey said the new proposal includes the development of about 3000 new properties in the first stage, with 30 per cent of the homes social housing.
The NSW Government’s updated vision for the Waterloo Estate.
The NSW Government’s updated vision for the Waterloo Estate.
“LAHC undertook extensive community and stakeholder consultation and the proposal will include an additional 100 new social housing dwellings in the area,” Minister Pavey said.

“By deconcentrating disadvantage, we can breathe new life into local economies to re-energise social housing to create vibrant communities, not just buildings — this is emblematic of the way we are now delivering social housing.”
Buildings have been cut from 40 to 32 storeys — still a long way from the City of Sydney’s desire for 13 storeys maximum.
There has also been a reduction in the total dwellings in the project, down from about 7000 to 6200.
The government is now proposing 2.57ha of open space in the area, which includes a signature park adjacent to the new Metro Station.
Population growth in the area was more than triple the Greater Sydney average in the year to 2019.
That population boom set to continue with the incoming Metro Station bringing increased density to the 17ha site and surrounding areas.
Lord Mayor Clover Moore said the council is still assessing the proposal.
Water, Property and Housing Minister Melinda Pavey. Picture: Toby Zerna
Water, Property and Housing Minister Melinda Pavey. Picture: Toby Zerna
Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore.
Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore.
“As we begin to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, this redevelopment offers the opportunity for more social and affordable housing in the inner city, while also boosting jobs in the construction sector,” she said.
“The City is committed to working with LAHC to ensure development of the site respects the character of the area and is supported by quality public spaces for the benefit of the community.”
Over the life of the Waterloo South Project it’s expected there will be about 6600 jobs created.
The City of Sydney’s alternative plan for Waterloo Estate, released in 2019.
The City of Sydney’s alternative plan for Waterloo Estate, released in 2019.
The government estimates the project will start in 2022-2023, depending on planning approval.
Until the 1990s Waterloo had some of the highest concentrations of public housing of any Sydney suburb.
Public housing blocks in the area still have security guards on site, dubbed “concierges”.
Like other sites across the city including Claymore, Airds and the recently approved Ivanhoe Estate in Macquarie Park, the government is aiming to break up large concentrations of public housing in the one area.
Waterloo Estate is the largest project in LAHC’s $22 billion Communities Plus program.
SYDNEY PROJECTS FAST-TRACKED
The state government is running full steam ahead in their mission to supercharge the property sector, approving $13 billion in projects in just under three months.
Planning Minister Rob Stokes had given the green light to 47 projects and more than 8000 dwellings since March 1.

To put that in perspective, they have approved as many dwellings as exist in the whole north west Sydney suburb of Kellyville – an area which took decades to develop.
Ivanhoe Estate in Macquarie Park, the Snowy Hydro 2.0 scheme and a swathe of education projects have been the big ticket items.
“We’re fast-tracking planning assessments to get shovel-ready projects started as soon as possible to support communities right across the state both now and in the months ahead,” Mr Stokes said.
“I’m calling on councils to follow our lead to fast-track assessments so they too can help to keep people in jobs and the economy moving.
“The construction industry is one of the few sectors that has been able to continue throughout this crisis.”
Urban Taskforce CEO Tom Forrest said the difference between today and this time last year has been chalk and cheese.
“This time last year, and before the election, nothing was being approved and there was a feeling that projects were not being supported by social infrastructure,” he said.
“Now we are seeing schools being approved and the government making very positive changes to the planning system.
”These projects have been (or will be) subject to the same planning laws, the same requirements for community consultation and public exhibition.”
The government will announce another tranche of projects around June 18


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,887 Posts
Discussion Starter #269
True to form. No surprise once the govt. handed over planning to CoS. As expected, council planners have given the finger to the govt planners and followed their own plan.

So "improved" plan means c.1400 people fewer will have places to live in the area and the aim of scattering the social housing ghetto has been watered down. We need more social housing but re-concentrating it in this relatively small area is counter-productive.

Lopping 8 storeys off the top of any towers will make all the difference to the world as we know it even in the new Post-Covidian Age. < sarcasm

All the parks and open spaces will be welcome but, please, ease up on the gum tree obsession as they are crap at providing shade in Sydney's heat.

We just have to hope architects can create some fine buildings despite what will be predetermined concepts courtesy of the 'creative minds' of CoS Planning. < more sarcasm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,500 Posts
More info on the Waterloo estate South Planning proposal

The NSW Land and Housing Corporation (LAHC) has lodged a planning proposal with the City of Sydney to advance the Waterloo Estate redevelopment process.
The proposal to renew Waterloo South represents the first of three stages in the NSW Government’s proposed redevelopment plans and accounts for about 65 per cent of the entire site.

Waterloo South will deliver much needed, new social housing while creating the least amount of disruption for existing tenants.
It will also allow the early delivery of two new parks that will provide over 2 hectares of public open space.

LAHC will continue working with the City of Sydney on plans for Waterloo Central and Waterloo North.

Link to LAHC Wateloo website


















 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,887 Posts
Discussion Starter #272
Great post, upwards, as is traditional.

Despite it all, it is going to be a vast improvement on what is there now.
I'm looking forward to some interesting, individual building designs and pleasant parks and streetscapes...even if there are gums.
What's that old building repurposed as a sort of café?
And is that another Kengo Kuma or a very large locust cocoon?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Funny definition of "slashed". 7000 dwellings down to 6200 represents an 11% decrease. Typical daily tele crap.

Also the suggestion that the 100 new social housing dwellings will be "tax payer funded" is likely inaccurate. As govt has stated many many times, the renewal of social housing is paid for under the "communities plus" program by uplifts in density, at no cost to government. This is part of the reason the outcomes are sub-par.

Plans for the mega Waterloo Estate in Sydney have slashed the number of new dwellings, cut building heights and increased public space. The NSW Land and Housing Corporation ha...
Waterloo Estate dwellings slashed, social housing increased

It is the suburban mega city that was originally dubbed a “planning disaster” by Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore.
A year later the updated plans for the Waterloo Estate near Redfern have been dramatically dialled down in an effort to win wider community support and get the project moving.
Updated plans for the Waterloo Estate.
Updated plans for the Waterloo Estate.
In the latest large scale project aimed at breaking up Sydney’s public housing ghettos, the NSW Land and Housing Corporation’s updated planning proposal for the site has seen eight storeys chopped off the tallest towers, wider streets and a 4000sq m increase in open space.

But in the face of criticism that too many public housing tenants are being pushed out of the city, The Sunday Telegraph can reveal the state government has added more taxpayer-funded units to the project.
Water, Property and Housing Minister Melinda Pavey said the new proposal includes the development of about 3000 new properties in the first stage, with 30 per cent of the homes social housing.
The NSW Government’s updated vision for the Waterloo Estate.
The NSW Government’s updated vision for the Waterloo Estate.
“LAHC undertook extensive community and stakeholder consultation and the proposal will include an additional 100 new social housing dwellings in the area,” Minister Pavey said.

“By deconcentrating disadvantage, we can breathe new life into local economies to re-energise social housing to create vibrant communities, not just buildings — this is emblematic of the way we are now delivering social housing.”
Buildings have been cut from 40 to 32 storeys — still a long way from the City of Sydney’s desire for 13 storeys maximum.
There has also been a reduction in the total dwellings in the project, down from about 7000 to 6200.
The government is now proposing 2.57ha of open space in the area, which includes a signature park adjacent to the new Metro Station.
Population growth in the area was more than triple the Greater Sydney average in the year to 2019.
That population boom set to continue with the incoming Metro Station bringing increased density to the 17ha site and surrounding areas.
Lord Mayor Clover Moore said the council is still assessing the proposal.
Water, Property and Housing Minister Melinda Pavey. Picture: Toby Zerna
Water, Property and Housing Minister Melinda Pavey. Picture: Toby Zerna
Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore.
Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore.
“As we begin to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, this redevelopment offers the opportunity for more social and affordable housing in the inner city, while also boosting jobs in the construction sector,” she said.
“The City is committed to working with LAHC to ensure development of the site respects the character of the area and is supported by quality public spaces for the benefit of the community.”
Over the life of the Waterloo South Project it’s expected there will be about 6600 jobs created.
The City of Sydney’s alternative plan for Waterloo Estate, released in 2019.
The City of Sydney’s alternative plan for Waterloo Estate, released in 2019.
The government estimates the project will start in 2022-2023, depending on planning approval.
Until the 1990s Waterloo had some of the highest concentrations of public housing of any Sydney suburb.
Public housing blocks in the area still have security guards on site, dubbed “concierges”.
Like other sites across the city including Claymore, Airds and the recently approved Ivanhoe Estate in Macquarie Park, the government is aiming to break up large concentrations of public housing in the one area.
Waterloo Estate is the largest project in LAHC’s $22 billion Communities Plus program.
SYDNEY PROJECTS FAST-TRACKED
The state government is running full steam ahead in their mission to supercharge the property sector, approving $13 billion in projects in just under three months.
Planning Minister Rob Stokes had given the green light to 47 projects and more than 8000 dwellings since March 1.

To put that in perspective, they have approved as many dwellings as exist in the whole north west Sydney suburb of Kellyville – an area which took decades to develop.
Ivanhoe Estate in Macquarie Park, the Snowy Hydro 2.0 scheme and a swathe of education projects have been the big ticket items.
“We’re fast-tracking planning assessments to get shovel-ready projects started as soon as possible to support communities right across the state both now and in the months ahead,” Mr Stokes said.
“I’m calling on councils to follow our lead to fast-track assessments so they too can help to keep people in jobs and the economy moving.
“The construction industry is one of the few sectors that has been able to continue throughout this crisis.”
Urban Taskforce CEO Tom Forrest said the difference between today and this time last year has been chalk and cheese.
“This time last year, and before the election, nothing was being approved and there was a feeling that projects were not being supported by social infrastructure,” he said.
“Now we are seeing schools being approved and the government making very positive changes to the planning system.
”These projects have been (or will be) subject to the same planning laws, the same requirements for community consultation and public exhibition.”
The government will announce another tranche of projects around June 18


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,887 Posts
Discussion Starter #274 (Edited)
The media should be indicted for the deliberate abuse of the English language. One term that gets my goat, so-to-speak, is a headline saying 'So&So Snubbed in Awards/or whatever'. He/she/they were not 'snubbed' which indicates a deliberate and nasty action, but they were simply 'not selected/chosen' or did not win first place. Happens a lot around Oscar time, etc. Similarly, recently there was a big headline that Sydney's population would be slashed or similar b/c of COVID-19 when it fact, Sydney's population will continue to grow but at a slower pace.

Similarly the term 'Mega City' used in the articles above is nonsense. It may be a mega project but to call it a city is rubbish reporting.

Enough with the huffin'&puffin' in outrage for the moment: I'm trying to see the best in this disappointing but not unexpected, in some aspects, project which will, as I mentioned above, be a vast improvement on what is currently occupying the area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,887 Posts
Discussion Starter #275
I did try to be more positive about these plans but now that I've seen the pretty pictures I am reading the text more carefully for a bit of a reality check.

Comments such as:
"Buildings have been cut from 40 to 32 storeys — still a long way from the City of Sydney’s desire for 13 storeys maximum.
There has also been a reduction in the total dwellings in the project, down from about 7000 to 6200."
...do not give encouragement.

So much for Mrs Clover's many demands that more housing be provided by the state government.
She is careful not to give approval to the current proposal but generalises about more social housing - where she sees her voter base, I suppose.

This proposal does not have the council's approval despite all the happy hurrahs in the media release and is yet to go through the council's cleansing, improving and inevitable downsizing process so stand by for substantial trimming and the council's favourite of top chopping of towers and elimination of ambitious &/or creative ideas that do not conform to council's conservative and conformist rules and regulations.

How did I get to be so cynical? I hope I am wrong to be suspicious...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,887 Posts
Discussion Starter #276
HERE WE GO AGAIN -


Future of Waterloo's public housing towers unclear as revamp powers on
Megan Gorrey
By Megan Gorrey
June 15, 2020 — 12.00am

Hundreds of residents in Waterloo's biggest public housing blocks face an uncertain future after the state government split planning for its redevelopment of the inner Sydney estate into three precincts.
The NSW Land and Housing Corporation has lodged plans with the City of Sydney Council to build 3000 units in towers up to 32 storeys at Waterloo South, which is being revamped alongside the future metro rail station.
The government has lodged a lower-density plan than initially proposed for part of the Waterloo public housing estate.


The government has lodged a lower-density plan than initially proposed for part of the Waterloo public housing estate.CREDIT:NSW GOVERNMENT

The government has spruiked revised plans to separate the 19-hectare site into three "sub-precincts" as an opportunity to transform the majority of the ageing estate with "new and better fit-for-purpose housing, retail and community facilities" and "access to more and better quality open space, including two new parks".

But the rezoning proposal for Waterloo South has triggered concerns about the development and the provision of social housing in the later two stages of the project, Waterloo Central and Waterloo North.

"The community around Redfern and Waterloo have seen so many stages of consultations and masterplans for the area," Newtown Greens MP Jenny Leong said. "It's outrageous."

The government and City of Sydney have been at odds over plans to raze the estate's existing buildings and relocate about 2500 residents to make way for a higher density mix of social, affordable and private homes.
Planning for Waterloo South does not include the Matavai and Turanga towers, or larger blocks at the northern end of the estate.


Planning for Waterloo South does not include the Matavai and Turanga towers, or larger blocks at the northern end of the estate.CREDIT:NSW GOVERNMENT

The government's plan to demolish the estate for 6800 dwellings in towers up to 40 storeys was criticised by Sydney's lord mayor Clover Moore as an "urban disaster". It prompted the council's planners to put forward a lower-density proposal for 5300 homes in blocks up to 13 storeys, while retaining some buildings.

Housing Minister Melinda Pavey said the government's revised proposal provided 100 additional social housing in Waterloo South.

210192

The estate has been separated into three "sub-precincts".CREDIT:NSW GOVERNMENT

The precinct covering two-thirds of the estate has two-hectares of open space, wider tree-lined streets and more bike paths.
REDWatch community group spokesman Geoff Turnbull said the fate of the Matavai and Turanga towers, which house 500 residents, and larger housing blocks in Waterloo Central and Waterloo North was "still to be determined".
Mr Turnbull said residents were concerned preparing plans for one part of the estate first would make it difficult to work out how the buildings and public open spaces in later precincts might work together.
City of Sydney Labor councillor Linda Scott, said it was "unhelpful the NSW government has not allowed the community to consider the whole of the Waterloo redevelopment at the same time".

A spokeswoman for Ms Pavey said the "retention and refurbishment" of the Matavai and Turanga towers "will be explored in consultation with the City of Sydney as part of future planning proposals".
"The remainder of the estate, Waterloo Central and Waterloo North, are still under consideration and their masterplans and planning proposals will be progressed in consultation with the City of Sydney," she said.
The Matavai and Turanga buildings are home to about 500 public housing residents.

The Matavai and Turanga buildings are home to about 500 public housing residents. CREDIT:COLE BENNETTS

"The final dwelling numbers and mix for these precincts, and the entire estate are subject to future planning proposals."

In a letter to residents, Ms Moore said the council would "rigorously assess" the government's application before more detailed plans were released for public consultation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,790 Posts
The current buildings are decrepit why throw yet more money at buildings that do not work? But agree that there should be sufficient social housing and not just private dwellings. The current estate is no go area, a ghetto and it doesn't work.

I suspect if Woolloomooloo a similar very central underutilised social housing hole was ever redeveloped we would come across the same conflicts of interest. Obviously the COS has an interest in the sites the independents get a lot of votes from these people.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,366 Posts
The current buildings are decrepit why throw yet more money at buildings that do not work? But agree that there should be sufficient social housing and not just private dwellings. The current estate is no go area, a ghetto and it doesn't work.

I suspect if Woolloomooloo a similar very central underutilised social housing hole was ever redeveloped we would come across the same conflicts of interest. Obviously the COS has an interest in the sites the independents get a lot of votes from these people.
1) My impression has always been that the Labor Party regards social housing as a reliable source of votes and having the housing concentrated in blocks (such as Waterloo) is important in terms of council, state and federal election results in respect of the electorates involved.

2) The towers simply do not work and it should be noted that the towers they were copied from in the UK do not work either.

3) I often use the 343 bus to Waterloo and have noticed that some (many?) of the social housing residents appear to be at the very least a bit "odd"; if the social housing were to be dispersed I am not at all sure they would be acceptable to their new neighbours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
The current buildings are decrepit why throw yet more money at buildings that do not work? But agree that there should be sufficient social housing and not just private dwellings. The current estate is no go area, a ghetto and it doesn't work.

I suspect if Woolloomooloo a similar very central underutilised social housing hole was ever redeveloped we would come across the same conflicts of interest. Obviously the COS has an interest in the sites the independents get a lot of votes from these people.
"These people" - what do you mean?
 
261 - 280 of 288 Posts
Top