Skyscraper City Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought it might be interesting to get a thread going that could suggest alternatives to the dilemma of whether or not to change Marshall Field's into Macy's.

There's got to be some middle ground out there, some way of satisfying Federated's need to consolidate its operations (perhaps under two major chains) and be effective in metropolitan Chicago with Chicago's need to see the Field's name continue.

Earlier I made some suggestions, which I solified here. I'd be interested in your thoughts on this....and ideas of your own.

*********

1. Proposal one: Field's is State Street
This proposal recognizes that the State Street Marshall Field's is the real basis of sentiment about abandoning the Field's name. It recongizes there has never been a property like Field's on State that has been converted to another chain's name. It's also recongizes that this bemouth could not be successful without the Field name, the Field's Christmas windows, the Field tree in the Walnut Room, etc. It recognizes the tourist attraction nature of the store and realizes that the name Macy's won't work.

Under this proposal, all other Marshall Field's properties can be converted to Macy's and/or Bloomingdale. The downtown store remains, as it should be, Marshall Field's. Federated can afford to run it as a one store operation since it's real desire (consolidating the Macy's name in major markets across the country) will be established.

This one remaining Field's will remain profitable because it will offer the following department:

select Macy's departments
select Bloomingdale's departments
its own Marshall Field's departments
an increase in the boutiques that dominate the stores lower level now (i.e. Barbara's books, Starbucks, etc.)

Thus even the Marshall Field's on State will be utilized by Macy's and Bloomingdale's in their national ad campaigns.

2. Proposal two: ]The best of Marshall Field's
similiar to Proposal one. The Field's store on State will look just like the other proposal. However, the most important, high profile, high end (and often largest) stores in the chain will also retain the Field's name (State, Water Tower, Old Orchard, Oakbrook, Woodfield, Northbrook Court). All six stores would be oranized the same way, offering the same four departments (Macy's, Bloomingdale's, Marshall Field's and private venders) that were suggested on State. This could be modified depending on Bloomingdale's and Macy's locations. For example, in Old Orchard, no Bloomingdale's merchandise would need to be sold since the shopping center has its own Bloomie's. If Water Tower's L&T becomes Macy's, then the Fields in Water Tower would not sell Macy's or Bloomingdale's (a block away at 900 N) merchandise.

In both proposals, stores like Hawthorn, Fox Valley, River Oaks, Orland Square, etc., could easily be converted to Macy's without it causing too much of a problem. The Field's panache (admittedly weakened in time), never made it to some of its more mundane suburban outposts.

*********

again...just ideas. tell me what you think and please add some of your own.
somewhere in this mess is a compromise and a real win/win solution...hopefully it will be found.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Didn't i hear somewhere in an artilce that Federated was interested in creating an ULTRA LUXURY department store more similar to Nordstrom's and meant to compete with Nordstrom's. This would mean that more Marshall Fields stores would be opened up around the Mid-West and possibly the Country i assume. It's easier to turn around an already existing name like Marshall Fields rather than opening a new department store out of blue. Anyways Marshall Field's use to be high end until Target turned it into shit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
229 Posts
Found this, but i don't know if it's a lot to worry about:

Ads sending message on Field's fate?
Commercials for Macy's seen by some as sign of change, but company says no decision has yet been made on Chicago icon's future

By Becky Yerak
Tribune staff reporter
Published March 29, 2005


What do "Desperate Housewives" and John Wayne's "Rooster Cogburn" have in common?

Chicagoans watching both the hot ABC series and the American Movie Classics film over the weekend also would have caught advertisements for Macy's--a department store chain with no stores in the area.

To some, that raises the question of whether the Marshall Field's name is on the way out in light of Federated Department Stores Inc.'s recently announced deal to purchase May Department Stores Co., parent of Field's and Lord & Taylor.

Federated has a history of consolidating all of its regional chains into its Macy's division.

But Macy's says that the Chicago ads are an outgrowth of a long-planned campaign to convert 400 of its regional stores--operating as Bon-Macy's, Burdines-Macy's, Goldsmith's-Macy's, Lazarus-Macy's and Rich's-Macy's--to simply Macy's on March 6.

Federated insists that it still hasn't decided what to do about the Field's name.

Peter Sachse, president and chief marketing officer of Macy's, said Monday that Macy's decided back in December that it was going to run national TV ads in connection with the rebranding of the additional 400 stores to Macy's.

Most of the advertisements are on cable stations.

"However, we did have a spot [Sunday] night on `Desperate Housewives.' It ran nationally," Sachse said. "It was the very first ad in the very first pod. It ran at [8:07 p.m. Chicago time]."

The decision to run national broadcast ads "was made in the fourth quarter of last year. The acquisition occurred in the first quarter of this year," Sachse said. "One had nothing to do with the other."

But why not opt out of markets where there are no Macy's stores to save money?

"Macy's stores cover approximately 55 percent of the United States, and the break-even is right about there between spot and national," he said. "If you buy it spot, that's local, and the cost of buying spot vs. buying national is just about at break-even at 55 percent and 60 percent of covering America."

Federated Chief Executive Terry Lundgren has said the retailer will do research and talk to shoppers before deciding what to do with the names of Lord & Taylor and Field's.

But in a speech about the 400 stores' rebranding at the National Retail Federation convention in New York in January, Lundgren also presented evidence supporting the change.

He said 70 percent of shoppers said a name change didn't matter. In fact, 10 percent said they'd shop more often at a Macy's than they would at their hometown chain. Only 5 percent thought a name change was a terrible idea.

Asked about the future of the Field's name, Sachse referred back to Lundgren's comments when the deal was announced.

Six years ago, Mayor Richard Daley erupted when Target Corp., then the owner of Field's, moved the production of Frango mints out of the city.

But Daley has bit his lip on commenting about the Field's name. "They haven't done anything," he said March 1. "Why should I be commenting on something that no one knows is going to happen or not?"

On Monday, Sachse noted that Lundgren "has had conversations with the mayor and wants to have further conversations."

The 30-second ad on ABC's "Desperate Housewives" showed a woman placing her shoes in a shoebox at home, then figuring their "real" price by the number of times she has worn them. Macy's ads also aired March 6 during the ABC telecast of the movie "Their Eyes Were Watching God."

Trying to appeal to women between the ages of 25 and 54, the Macy's ads are running on such cable stations as The Learning Channel, Lifetime, ABC Family, HGTV, A&E and American Movie Classics.

A Macy's ad aired Saturday afternoon, for example, during a broadcast of "Rooster Cogburn" with John Wayne. "Macy's--Way to Shop," was the message.

Dan Skoda, a former Field's president who now runs D&R Consulting, still believes that Federated won't ditch the Field's name entirely, arguing that the franchise still has credibility in the Midwest.

But he said that select Field's stores, or even Lord & Taylors, might be converted to Macy's.

"My guess is they would take some of the smaller Field's and turn them into Macy's," particularly in such markets as Minneapolis and Detroit, where the Field's name has less meaning.

"It's a good way to start introducing the name into the market," Skoda said of the national ad buys.

He also noted that, when a company buys a package of national ads, it might not make much financial sense to exclude a market such as Chicago.

Bernard Sosnick, an Oppenheimer & Co. analyst, told Bloomberg Radio recently that he expects to see Macy's eventually append its name to Field's, just as it did with its other regional chains.

New York retail consultant Howard Davidowitz believes that the Field's name is doomed.

"What Federated is trying to do is build a national brand. Once they do that, you've got tremendous cost savings from advertising and marketing," he said. "Federated is going to be down fundamentally to two brands: Macy's and Bloomingdale's. Marshall Field's is history."
 

·
Chicago's #1 Fan
Joined
·
2,334 Posts
I believe that proposal number 1 is the most important. it is imparitave to retain the State Street Field's store. I wouldn't cry if the Oakbrook Store or the WTP store were renamed, but I will act like a total bitch if they rename the State Street store Macy's.

But another thing that the State Street store needs is an exterior renovation/restoration. The terra cotta that is cracked needs to be replaced and they need to clean the facade. They also need to restore the cornice to the building like they are presently doing with Carson Piere Scott. They need to bring back this building to it's former glory days, not only with the merchandise it carries, but with it's general appearance.

They need to bring back Frengo Mints to Chicago. I believe that this will boaster its popularity.

Field's got cheap and run-down after the Field's family sold the store.

It's time for an extreme makeover, name change excluded.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Federated is in a dream land if they think that the national numbers would apply to chicago about Fields. Fields is as much a part of chicago as the sears tower, the cubs or the bears. If they were smart the would use the State St store as a model for there Neiman Marcus fighter. Keep all the higher end Fields as Fields and turn the rest into macys would not pose to much of a problem. Then start to speard Fields to areas with a Neiman Marcus and you have a name brand that has a history and prestage that could be used as selling points.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
TheJim said:
Federated is in a dream land if they think that the national numbers would apply to chicago about Fields. Fields is as much a part of chicago as the sears tower, the cubs or the bears. If they were smart the would use the State St store as a model for there Neiman Marcus fighter. Keep all the higher end Fields as Fields and turn the rest into macys would not pose to much of a problem. Then start to speard Fields to areas with a Neiman Marcus and you have a name brand that has a history and prestage that could be used as selling points.
Jim, you are unquestionably right. Just like the national media that covers this acts as if Federated can do as it wishes without reprecutions.

Lost in it all is that Federated wants to own stores in Chicago to
make money. If Chicago balks at a move to turn Field's into Macy's, if it boycotts (which I think it will), if Daley and the city make this a cause celebre (which I think they will), if Carsons markets itself as being a Chicago name (which I think they will) and encourage people to shop there because of it, Federated will be affected.

Federated owns a piece of property on State Street that simply cannot be as profitable with Macy's on the door. Just as North Michigan Avenue would not be as profitable if it went back to being Pine Street. Or the Cubs be as successful if they decided to go back to calling themselves the Chicago White Stockings.

Chicago is not Atlanta, it is not Seattle, it is not a whole slew of other cities. It is, more than any other place on the continent, opposed with Macy's replacing the home time favorite....and have the clout to carry it out.

If Federated thinks it can be dismissive of Chicago's attitudes on the Field's issue, they do so at its peril.
 

·
chek ur hed
Joined
·
473 Posts
Isn't Field's already at least on par with Nordstrom? I can't see Field's becoming a Macy's. That would be exactly like changing our Herald Square Macy's to a Marshall Field's. Would never happen.
 

·
Formerly InTheLoop
Joined
·
485 Posts
lokinyc said:
Isn't Field's already at least on par with Nordstrom? I can't see Field's becoming a Macy's. That would be exactly like changing our Herald Square Macy's to a Marshall Field's. Would never happen.
^That is a point I brought up before... Macy's Herald Square is just what it is, Macy's. And Marshall Fields on State is the same way. Both have unique qualities that are found nowhere else. New Yorkers feel the same way about Macy's as we do about MF's.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
InTheLoop said:
^That is a point I brought up before... Macy's Herald Square is just what it is, Macy's. And Marshall Fields on State is the same way. Both have unique qualities that are found nowhere else. New Yorkers feel the same way about Macy's as we do about MF's.
And let's make sure those MF's at Macy's never get control of Marshall Field's!!
 

·
SSLL
Joined
·
8,354 Posts
Option 1 looks best. The Macy's at Herald Square is THE Macy's, and the State Street Field's is THE Field's. The State Street store could be an incubator for new formats or new merchandise that Federated could use to roll across the country at Bloomingdale's and Macy's. They were very seriously considering keeping Burdine's in Florida, but chose not to. But I don't think South Florida has a flagship for Burdine's as important or iconic as MF's State Street. I think they'll sell Lord & Taylor too, including the highly valued Manhattan store (and site).

Nonetheless, I think the best would be is the option of creating Field's across the nation to either go ultra-lux (à la Neiman Marcus) or mid-lux (à la Nordstrom), as Federated will have almost 100 sites of overlap in its merger with May.
__________
Macy’s reigns on name parade

When Federated Department Stores begins folding May Department Stores Co.’s stable of regional banners into its Macy’s operation sometime next year, the Cincinnati-based retailer will do so with total confidence, executives say. They learned during the last round of conversions that the Macy’s brand trumps regional names — even a powerhouse like Burdines.


In March Federated put the 107-year-old Burdines brand on ice in Florida, unveiling gleaming new Macy’s signs on its 61 former Burdines-Macy’s stores throughout the Sunshine State.


Federated executives did not make the decision lightly, says Timothy Adams, the first president of the newly christened Macy’s Florida, who was also the last CEO of Burdines and the only president of Burdines-Macy’s.


“For a brief moment, Federated considered keeping Burdines as a stand-alone concept like Bloomingdale’s,” because of its rabid Floridian following, Adams told investors at a Smith Barney conference in Florida in February.


But now that the whole conversion process is done, Federated is more than pleased with its decision, he says. Industry watchers predict that Federated will consider the same option for May’s Lord & Taylor and Marshall Field’s brands, including whether to sell or operate the brands as stand-alone operations.


On the same day Burdines disappeared, so did Bon Marché, Goldsmith’s, Lazarus and Rich’s. They were all storied regional retailers in their own right, but Federated says consumer research revealed that the power of the Macy’s brand overshadowed them — including Burdines. “Forty-two million people watch the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade,” Adams said.


The Burdines-Macy’s stores did better-than-average sales last year thanks to the added appeal of the Macy’s name, Adams says. “The west coast of Florida didn’t have any Macy’s,” Adams said. “When we added that powerful national brand, it drew in new shoppers.”


Federated has already committed dollars to expanding and renovating former Burdines-Macy’s stores in Bradenton, Fort Lauderdale, Miami Beach and St. Petersburg, he says.


Now Federated hopes to accomplish similar feats with May’s regional brands, including Famous-Barr, Filene’s, Foley’s, Hecht’s, Robinsons-May and Strawbridge’s. It won’t be easy, but it will be worth it in the long run, Adams says. He admits that the hard-core Burdines shopper is still out there, waiting for Macy’s to flop. “We’ll have to overachieve,” he said, “just to stay where we are in her mind.”
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Supposedly the real advantage to consolidation around one name (such as Macy's) was to cut down advertising expenses.

What a shame that Federated couldn't have gone another route with department store chains it has aquired across the country and potentially with Marshall Field's.

How hard would it have been to give the local stores names like Burdines, a Federated Department Store or Rich's a Federated Department Store (with the words Burdines and Rich's written much larger and bolder.

Then, when advertising, label the ad's: Federated Department Stores, not Macy's.

Such a system could have served both Federated and the cities in which it operated.

Look, Field's in a way ceased to be Field's when it was first acquired. We're not dumb. We know there are no local dept. stores anymore. Still, the name means something. I think Chicago could be perfectly comfortable
with a store named MARSHALL FIELD'S, a Federated Department Store. Even more comfortable knowing there was another chain known as MACY'S, a Federated Department Store
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
879 Posts
Good New on Marshall Field's

Field's likely to keep its name
By Becky Yerak
Tribune staff reporter
Published June 18, 2005


The chances that the Marshall Field's name will survive might be better than expected, according to two Wall Street analysts.

When Federated Department Stores Inc. announced plans in February to buy May Department Stores Co., some retail observers said the deal spelled doom for the Field's name, a Chicago-born chain owned by May.

Federated has a track record of changing the names of its regional department stores to Macy's. The May acquisition is expected to close in the third quarter.

Two retail analysts expressed optimism, however, about the future of the Field's name in a Women's Wear Daily report on Friday about the New York flagship of Lord & Taylor, another May asset.

"The L&T banner is not going to be the one that survives," Citibank Smith Barney analyst Deborah Weinswig told the trade publication. "Marshall Field's has been chosen as the one to survive."

Weinswig couldn't be reached Friday to elaborate.

Also in the article, Deutsche Bank analyst Bill Dreher noted Field's "tremendous following."

"I wouldn't expect Federated to move away from that name but rather expand it in the Midwest," he said.

A Federated spokeswoman would not comment on the report. "We've got nothing to say on that right now," she told the Tribune on Friday.
 

·
SSLL
Joined
·
8,354 Posts
^Great news. I say they might even expand it nationwide. With the overlap in the West and East coasts, there's bound to be some retention of the department stores. What better way than to hold on to some of the really chichi ones with a new, but storied brand, Field's!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Federated has the corner on quality department stores. I would think the flexibility of having three flagship names (Macy's, Bloomingdale's, Field's) exceeds that of two (Macy's, Bloomingdale's). I think just about everybody agrees that L&T is toast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
^ Lord & Taylor hasn't been a top-tier department store for quite a while... it's barely superior to Carson's.


Bloomingdale's is of course the best of the Federated lineup, but Macy's and Field's each have a lot of history and don't overlap much geographically. Those two will probably move towards carrying more or less identical merchandise, with the same buying and warehousing operation serving both, but with their own marketing and branding, and a few of the unique offerings (like MF's Frango mints).
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top