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Perhaps we should close 383 Albert as a thread given its not going to happen? It's just a value adding exercise. We are better than this people!
Charter Hall do develop new office towers, they're currently building Wesley Place in Melbourne, the GPO Tower in Adelaide and in Brisbane they're just finishing up 900 Ann St in the Valley as well as owning the 11 Breakfast Creek Rd commercial tower site.

So a future redevelopment of this site is not out of the question.
 

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Not_the_timber_man
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IMO there needs to be changes somewhere to discourage practices like this where companies buy a property then submit a DA they have no plans to actually build just so they can flip the property for a profit. Its far better for the city if land ends up in the hands of people who will actually build stuff on it.
why?
 

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Optimist
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Outside of us on here who get disappointed when a proposal doesn't go ahead it doesn't affect anyone else.
 
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Discussion Starter #85
Also, throwing up a new DA and selling the site doesn't necessarily mean they'll make a profit.
 

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Update, altered plans approved:

Source: https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/na...xxZKzFqFO-axAxfx0Ns1drq8TUrqmo3U_D5k1tfEVJB4E

Alterations approved for planned Suncorp Plaza replacement
Lucy Stone June 26, 2019 — 3.13pm

An appeal against the planned 36-storey replacement for Suncorp Plaza in Brisbane’s CBD has successfully had the design altered to improve views of the Uniting Church on Albert Street.

The Uniting Church launched the appeal after Brisbane City Council approved the demolition of Suncorp Plaza and the construction of a new glass-plated tower on the site, between Albert and Turbot streets.

The original design (inset) had a small cantilevered space above the entry of the building.
Turbit Nominees lodged the application in 2017 for the major redevelopment at 343 Albert Street, formerly the SGIO Building, expected to require one of the biggest inner-city high-rise demolition projects in Australia.

Council approved the application in March 2018 with additional conditions around the design, landscaping of Albert Street and upgrades to the public walkways through the street to King George Square.

The appeal named the council and Turbit Nominees as respondents and asked the planning and environment court to reject the application.

Related Article
Artist impression of Skytower Brisbane at 222 Margaret St, Brisbane.
The church’s appeal raised concerns about the new tower’s impact on the heritage-listed Albert Street church next door, arguing the planned 36-storey tower “does not respect or respond to the relationship with the Albert Street Church”.

The church also argued the development “fails to ensure the Albert Street Church's cultural heritage significance is appropriately protected and managed” and did not tie in neatly with the Albert Street precinct.

The appeal also objected to the tower’s impact on views toward the church across the precinct and said it did not provide a high quality public space “or subtropical civic space that is important to the city’s identity”.

Negotiations between Turbit Nominees and the church continued through the court process until the design of the tower was adjusted to not overshadow the church.

The adjusted design reduced the floor plate size of the tower and altered the design to expand a cantilevered space from levels 1 to 8, to create a rising triangle of space beside the church.

The proposed new design raises the cantilevered space to provide more room between the new tower and the church.
The alterations to the south and south-western aspect of the new tower would provide better views to the church and reduce the footprint of the new tower on those levels.

It also altered the planned lighting on the new tower’s facade so that no lighting would run along the tower’s spine below the line of the church spire.

Related Article
Time's up for CBD clock as demolition of landmark tower is approved
Judge Nicole Kefford handed down a final decision last week, partially allowing the church’s appeal and approving the modified design to the new tower.

Suncorp Plaza was first built in the 1970s and was plagued with asbestos fears in recent years after a terminally ill man was awarded a payout for asbestos exposure in 2012.

DISCLOSURE: The Uniting Church is the owner of Wesley House, where Brisbane Times is based.
 

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For all the effort to demolish and rebuild, 36 levels is simply not worth it. I would prefer to keep the current tower until a decent proposal of at least 200m is proposed.
I think the proposed envelope is about maximum to comply with shadowing requirements of King George Square.
 

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I'm pretty certain that the current owners of the building aren't intending on redeveloping the site at least for a few years yet. I imagine by then they will want to rework their design.
 

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I didn't know that existed, but it's somewhat ironic considering one of the main complaints about KGS is the utter lack of shade.
Yeah but given where the sun sits in the sky this would create shade in winter when you want the sun, and not provide shade in summer when you do.
 

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I've sat in KGS a lot this winter filling in time for appointments etc. and there is not much bloody sun. This is anywhere from about 10 am. Earlier would be worse of course.
 

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I honestly thought this project was quite dead, but apparently not...

Redesign:




Glass tower over Brisbane CBD church back under planning cloud
Lucy Stone
By Lucy Stone
October 6, 2020 — 11.01pm
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A development application for a 36-storey glass plate tower approved to replace the existing Suncorp Plaza tower at 343 Albert Street has returned to Brisbane's planning court a second time.

The proposed new development design at 343 Albert Street removes the glass chamfer at the base of the tower entirely.

The proposed new development design at 343 Albert Street removes the glass chamfer at the base of the tower entirely.

In June last year, the Uniting Church won an appeal against Brisbane City Council and the Plaza's then-owner Turbit Nominees to significantly alter the base of the planned glass tower.

The court-approved alteration increased setbacks, widened a cantilevered space at the base of the 20,000 square metre tower and raised the "chamfered" triangular design to show off the church's spire.

Charter Hall, however, purchased the tower in 2019 and last week lodged a new court appeal requesting a "minor change" to the approved development application lodged by previous owners Morris Property Group.

Documents lodged with the court last week note that the alterations approved by the court last year were made "without accompanying structural documentation".

"Subsequent review has found the extent of the chamfer design places significant pressure on the structural efficiency of the tower," a report produced by Cox Architecture says.

"The other significant aspect of the design is that it is tied to the adjacent tower building. The service entry and three levels of the podium/basement for this project are existing floors that share structure and vehicle access with the neighbour."

The proposed alterations place greater emphasis on the heritage-listed church and its significance, setting back the tower's base footprint, scrapping the cantilevered triangular tower base and replacing them with an open courtyard supported by columns.

The court-approved alteration increased the cantilevered chamfer to widen space between the church and tower.

The court-approved alteration increased the cantilevered chamfer to widen space between the church and tower.

The report notes the proposed changes would significantly increase public space, greenery and the tower's overall connectivity to Turbot and Albert streets.

Instead of the single glass tower design originally approved, Charter Hall also plans to change the overall design to appear like two slimline towers, adding more balconies to higher levels and more green space around the church and tower.

The proposed designs are supported by the Uniting Church, documents lodged with the Brisbane planning court say.

The proposed designs are supported by the Uniting Church, documents lodged with the Brisbane planning court say.

A town planning report prepared by Urbis for Charter Hall notes the requested changes "retain the key aspects of the existing approval" and were made with the support of the Uniting Church and considered a "good outcome" by the council.

Suncorp Plaza was first built in the 1970s, and approved for demolition in 2018 to make way for a new tower at the prominent CBD location.

The Plaza tower was plagued with asbestos fears in recent years after a terminally ill man was awarded a payout for asbestos exposure in 2012.


 

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To be honest, I like the way the previous design had the lifted angle on the church corner.
 
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