SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,704 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/coventry_warwickshire/4919312.stm

Very sad news for Coventry and the Midlands but I'm guessing PSA Peugeot will still keep a UK headquarters and training facillity which will be based in the city. I recall BBLB were involved with masterplanning the Peugeot Stoke works site a while back and it's on their website.

I'm doing some work for Massey Ferguson who are going through this process at the moment. Production ceased a couple for years back at Banner Lane to which the dti were indifferent and production moved to Beauvais in France. They are now in the process of moving into a new Aedus designed office at Stoneleigh. A lot of jobs went with the production but they still employ over 600 people from around Coventry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,704 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
End of the road for Ryton
Apr 19 2006 By John Cranage and John Revill

Civic and business leaders last night called on French carmaker Peugeot to declare a stay of execution for its doomed Ryton plant.

They hope to win at least another year of life for the Coventry factory, where 2,300 jobs are set to disappear by 2007.

The calls were led by Councillor Ken Taylor, leader of the city council, who will seek talks with Peugeot following yesterday's announcement.

"Huge companies like Peugeot do not make decisions like this on the spur of the moment, but we hope to make them slow down their plans and maybe delay closing the plant to give people more of a chance to find other work," he said.

Coun Taylor was supported by Alan Durham, director of international trade and Coventry & Warwickshire Chamber, who said: "I think the decision to close the plant has been made and I don't think it is realistic to expect it to stay open in the long term.

"But one area that might be worth exploring is a year's delay if only to give the city more time to help the individuals and businesses that are being affected."

Jean Martin Folz, chief executive of Paris-based parent group PSA Peugeot Citroen, broke the news that production would end in 2007 to workers yesterday.

He said further investment could not be justified and that production would be wound down in two phases.

Of the two remaining shifts, one will close in July and the second will cease by mid-2007.

Fears have been growing for some time that Peugeot would not replace the 206 as Ryton's only model as production volumes ran down. But many within the car industry had pencilled in 2008 as the likely date for closure.

Jon Goodman, director of corporate communications and external affairs at PSA's British HQ in London, told The Birmingham Post: "Despite the tremendous efforts and the incredible improvements in productivity and quality made at Ryton over the last two years, it remains the most expensive of all our plants throughout the world.

"It costs 415 euros (£286) more to manufacture a car at Ryton than anywhere else."

It would cost PSA in the order of £176 million to upgrade Ryton to the standard needed to accommodate a new model.

Even after that, the plant would still have had the highest production costs in Europe.

Mr Goodman said right-hand drive variants of the 206 would be made for the UK market at PSA factories in France.

"This is a hugely difficult time for all of our employees, but unfortunately we have looked at this from every angle and despite having invested 93 million euros (£64 million) at Ryton between 2002-05 we cannot keep it open.

"We are handling a difficult situation as best we can and we hope that by staggering the closure we can reduce the impact of these workers coming on to the West Midlands job market."

PSA would not say how much decommissioning Ryton would cost, but an analyst said the group would have to take a charge of less than £69 million.

Mr Goodman said Peugeot would continue to employ several thousand people in the UK at sites including its Coventry HQ.

Coun Taylor summed up reaction to the announcement, saying: "It is a major blow to the city of Coventry and for Peugeot employees of the plant.

"Although there has been uncertainty over the long term future of the Ryton plant for some time, this news has come as a shock to us all, and we are extremely concerned by both the decision itself and its timing. We are feeling let down; we knew the 206 wasn't going to last forever, but we always hoped they would bring another product here."
...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,798 Posts
what has been dissapointing, but not surprising, is how little national media attention this has received. no offence, but when longbridge went we were flooded with images of brummies crying into their bovril. in fact, the rumour that land rover might close caused more of a fuss that the actual closure at ryton. same with browns lane, although to a lesser extent. not bitter, just seems fewer people fighting our corner than at the other end of the A45.
 

·
Second Citizen
Joined
·
16,937 Posts
^^Maybe it's because of the air of resignation?

It is sad news and I disagree with others that we should cease motor manufacturing (or not bemoan its decline). PSAPC closed Ryton because they can't get away with it in France. They make money but want to make even more (fine). Their spokesman said that it costs approx 350 Euros more per car to make at Ryton than elsewhere (ooh, about £200). This makes me really angry because car manufacturers are happy to rip off Britain with their car prices, but not allow £200 per car to ensure it is British.

The difference between Peugeot and Rover was Rover was the last British volume car maker. PSAPC is owned by the Frogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,704 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm not sure if I agree with you SkyBlue. I've been down south for the last week and I’ve noticed it's been pretty much headline news on the TV since it was announced. The Birmingham Post is certainly banging the drum for the Peugeot and Cov but the difference is that they haven’t gone bust and shat on 6000 people and their associated supply chain at least there has been some notice.

Coventry is the UK capital for Transport Design and has an illustrious automotive past but although volume manufacturing is dwindling it’s far from being the end of the road for the city. High end automotive and aerospace products is the direction it’s heading in the UK and Coventry is in a healthy position to captialise on this. Ford have invested heavily at Gaydon with Aston and Whitley with Jaguar, BMW at Hams Hall and even Prodrive want to set up a factory at Honily.

http://www.grandprix.com/ns/ns16323.html
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4923610.stm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
We actually 'produce' more cars now than at anytime since the 70s in the UK.
Also i find it ironic that the unions on TV moaning about management and calling for strikes. These are the same people who brought the industry to it knees in the 70s and support a political party whose high taxes have massively reduced the UKs competitiveness, and not just in car manufacturing.

You also won’t find any of the money or training packages put in place after the Rover collapse last year in Coventry, there is no election for Mr Blair this time.
 

·
ENTJ 8w9
Joined
·
11,993 Posts
Pete2005 said:
You also won’t find any of the money or training packages put in place after the Rover collapse last year in Coventry, there is no election for Mr Blair this time.
It's already in place. Rover was not liquidable and went insolvent. PSAPC is solvent and the workers will get paid and retrained without goverment emergency funds.

At least the frogs are going on strike as well. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
SimonTheSoundMan said:
It's already in place. Rover was not liquidable and went insolvent. PSAPC is solvent and the workers will get paid and retrained without goverment emergency funds.
Oh well I’m not an expert - just a cynic
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,705 Posts
skybluecity said:
what has been dissapointing, but not surprising, is how little national media attention this has received. no offence, but when longbridge went we were flooded with images of brummies crying into their bovril. in fact, the rumour that land rover might close caused more of a fuss that the actual closure at ryton. same with browns lane, although to a lesser extent. not bitter, just seems fewer people fighting our corner than at the other end of the A45.
Eh? It's received a _lot_ of media attention. The fact is that it's an assembly plant that imports components, and this has been on the cards for 2 years. No one in Coventry is surprised. Remember that TATA are planning a massive R&D and engineering centre (They already have a building at Warwick Uni - the old Rover R&D centre) in Coventry, and Jaguar are consolidating Whitley with functions from other PAG companies as well as a big business park in Whitley, which is aimed at a hi tech industry.

Historically, being mainly based in the Assembly business, Coventry's motor industry has always been susceptible to closure. Even at its height in the 1970s, the vast majority of the components were shipped in from elsewhere, mainly Brum.

Ryton's position was weakened when Peugot bought it from Chrysler and moved all the design centre to Paris. That took the majority of the skilled engineering jobs away and also made it a mere assembly plant with no design/engineering function.

Coventry may not be assembling anymore, but it still is the UK's major centre for engineering and R&D in the industry. Both Universities in the City have major links to the industry - Warwick with its manufacturing centre, and Coventry with its design centre.

People get all dewy eyed out about all these old names - and forget the cars they produced were mainly crap, sold simply due to the restrictive market in the UK, and never gained a foothold outside the UK. Britain produces as many cars now as it did during the heyday - there's a LOT more to the car industry than assembly, and most of the skills are in the high end side of the industry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,704 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Peugeot: Coventry's Last Car
BBC Radio 4 Monday 15 January 2007 11:00-11:30

Following last year's announcement that Peugeot's only UK car plant was to close, Adrian Chiles gained exclusive access to the factory, its managers, shop stewards and workers.

He followed the last car as it rolled off the production line and talked to those he has met along the way, about who they blame, how they feel and what it's been like to stay until the bitter end.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/factual/pip/97fb2/
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top