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Discussion Starter #61
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 25th October 2010.

Brewers & Bottlers of Newcastle upon Tyne - from 1850 to the present day.
Brian Bennison
Newcastle upon Tyne City Libraries & Arts.
1995.

This book, the ninth in this short series about "the Public Houses of Newcastle and the North East", is pehaps my favourite.

As can be seen from the title, this book not only covers the pubs, but also the 'brewers and bottlers', and is all the more fascinating for that!

The narrative is VERY informative, and the photos are quite rare, many of them not seen anywhere else . . .














I just had to include, as one of the example pages, the last one (above) which included The Midland.

In the early 1980s, I had some memorable times there, it wasn't the venue I frequented the most (I think The Portland and the Burton House jointly hold that record!) but some of the occasions I was there, long stick in the mind.

Great days!!

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Discussion Starter #62
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 1st November 2010.

The Northumbrian Pub, an Architectural History
Lynn F Pearson
Sandhill Press
1989.

This book, the tenth one in this short series about "the Public Houses of Newcastle and the North East", is unusual in that it is one I have not read myself, but it comes recommended . . .

WilfBurnsFan; October 10th 2010 said:
Another great pub book is Lynn Pearson's Northumbrian Pubs - the Duke of Cumberland (in the 'Scotswood Road PUBS' book) looks very similar to some of the Felling pubs she covered, by the practice of Septimus Oswald (I think). Big towers, domes, very impressive, no expense spared!
I think I will definitely try to get hold of a copy, but in the meantime . . .





also, the book is described on its own dust jacket, as . . .


To demonstrate that the pub is much more than just a building in a landscape, the author has gathered together strands of information on architecture, brewers, the local economy and social history and through the buildings themselves, shows why our local pubs look as they do today.

Examples are drawn from urban, country and coastal pubs, some now demolished, reaching from the Georgian era to the present day and beyond.

The trail of discovery takes the reader from the crowded city of Newcastle upon Tyne, through the quayside, then along the coast, out into Weardale and along the North Tyne Valley.

Much fascinating detail is given as the pubs are described, and the influence of the important brewing industries, and local architects, are examined.

Lavishly illustrated with an extensive bibliography

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Discussion Starter #63
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'Book of the Week' - W/C Monday 8th November 2010.

The Burglars Dog - Alternative Guide to Drinking in Newcastle upon Tyne
Mark Jones
Tonto Press
2006.


This book, the eleventh and final one in this short series about "the Public Houses of Newcastle and the North East", is explained (in it's authors own words) on the back cover, shown below.

There has been an updated version of the book, as explained on the Website, here . . .

http://www.theburglarsdog.co.uk/

Sadly, the website goes on to explain that the author has also "retired" from updating it, which is a shame, but it has been a very enjoyable experience (even if I didn't always agree with what was written) reading the book and the website - so many thanks for that!






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Discussion Starter #64
A great watering hole too.The back Turks.

Remember it well. We used to go in the hotel bar, then (I'm sure) you could walk through to the back bar and (eventually) out onto High Bridge.

Did that (in those days) ever have another name? Like the 'Royal Court' or 'The Collingwood', or something? It is all a bit vague!

I remember one night, late on, we couldn't seem to get through there, there was like a "metal bar gate" that was shut. I don't know if that was when they first started work on changing things around, or whether that was "just us" (late on that evening) . . .

The place on High Bridge opened as 'The Turks' years later, and (out of interest) the main barmaid in there is now at the other side of High Bridge, at the Duke.
 

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Geordieologist
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Remember it well. We used to go in the hotel bar, then (I'm sure) you could walk through to the back bar and (eventually) out onto High Bridge.

Did that (in those days) ever have another name? Like the 'Royal Court' or 'The Collingwood', or something? It is all a bit vague!

I remember one night, late on, we couldn't seem to get through there, there was like a "metal bar gate" that was shut. I don't know if that was when they first started work on changing things around, or whether that was "just us" (late on that evening) . . .

The place on High Bridge opened as 'The Turks' years later, and (out of interest) the main barmaid in there is now at the other side of High Bridge, at the Duke.
Hello everyone :)

The bar in the hotel was called 'Puncinello's' and had a gay clientele - it's described on the Northern Pride website's Gay Heritage Tour as "the resort of older ‘refined’ homosexuals". I called in a few times for lunchtime drinks with some friends who worked at Binns, and seem to remember the booths were designed to look like horse-drawn carriages (without the horses, obviously).

The bar on High Bridge was called the Lord Collingwood (also known as the Chain Locker). The Royal Court Grill was a cellar bar in the Bigg Market. You could definitely walk through to the Collingwood from the hotel.

The Royal Turks Hotel was quite upmarket and was used to catering for 'showbiz' types, with the Theatre Royal being nearby. I remember reading an interview with Rod Stewart in the 1970s where he said it was one of his favourite UK hotels. And of course, The Beatles wrote 'She Loves You' while staying at the hotel after playing at the Majestic in 1963
 

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Geordieologist
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Shows how blind I am then, as we all used to go to the Turks Head hotel a lot, and no one ever noticed the gay aspect!

THANKS for confirming the 'Lord Collingwood' name . . . I knew (sort of) that it was a name like that. Excellent!
I must admit that I didn't either. And I miss-spelt the name in my post, it should have said 'Punchinello'.
 

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Turk's Head

I used to frequent the Turk's Head in the 60s and I remember the long walk along the drab corridor linking the posh end with the cheap and cheerful "Back Turk's". There was a metal gate but I never saw it closed though it was never my last port of call.

As for the Beatles writing She Loves You in the Royal Turk's this is disputed and when asked in 2003 neither of the surviving members could remember whether it was the Imperial Hotel or the Royal Turk's Head where the group had stayed that night.
 

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Geordieologist
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As for the Beatles writing She Loves You in the Royal Turk's this is disputed and when asked in 2003 neither of the surviving members could remember whether it was the Imperial Hotel or the Royal Turk's Head where the group had stayed that night.
That's what it says on Wikipedia - and it doesn’t surprise me that neither Paul or Ringo could remember the name of a Newcastle hotel, forty years later!

But as I recall, the Council were going to put a plaque outside the Imperial based on a general assumption that the song was written there, despite there being no evidence that they’d stayed there that night.

However, a taxi driver claimed in the Chronicle that he’d dropped the band off at the Turks that evening, and their stay is confirmed in a book by Barry Miles called The Beatles Diary (a day-by-day account of their career, published in 1998), which also states that the song was written there.

Also, in 2006 Anderson & Garland auctioned a set of their autographs obtained by someone at Pilgrim Street police station, where they’d sought refuge from fans while in Newcastle at the time, which suggests they were using a city centre hotel. The Turks was the only hotel near the police station - a couple of hundred yards away.

It's by no means conclusive but the Turks' claim seems to be far more credible than the Imperial's.
 

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=Al Reetson;6706224
The bar on High Bridge was called the Lord Collingwood (also known as the Chain Locker). The Royal Court Grill was a cellar bar in the Bigg Market. You could definitely walk through to the Collingwood from the hotel.
The Collingwood bar in High Bridge, from P&T Image Archive, Newcastle City Council



Cheers
GBDT

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Discussion Starter #71
^^^^

FANTASTIC photo GBDT, brings back so many memories.

Not just for me, but for a whole group of us who meet up once a year at The Duke of Wellington, further along High Bridge. We have met up in the first week of December, every year since 1979, and I have sent this photo to all of them!

Mind, I can't actually remember that Maynards being there, which is surprising as I have a definite sweet tooth!
 

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Correct Wilf,

and here is the proof . . .







Well, thats it for me and the 'General Knowledge' thread, for today.

Four questions asked, and four questions very quickly and correctly answered!

Having now decided it's far too cold to venture out to the bar, then all I have to figure out is how to avoid having to watch the X Factor!!

Hmmmm, think I'll take the cat for a walk!
Aah the Grapes, a favoured watering establishment, no lasses!Was in the night it finally closed:cheers:
and look at the polis's hat it's got stripes and not the checks they have these days.
 

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i hope someone else will confirm this-the central has never been known as the coffin despite its shape. there was a pub further down old askew road which was, and i cant recall its name.
 

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thanks dx-my grandad used to drink in there and it looks a canny pub . you have just confirmed my view of the journal/chronicles lazy journalism!
 

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Andym, thanks for raising the point about the Central. I was puzzled by the references to it as the Coffin because I have lived in Gateshead most of my life and I have never heard it called such. The Coffin was always the Foresters on Askew Road and most locals never knew it as anything else. My grandfather used to take me to see Gateshead play at Redheugh Park occasionally and he would always stop for a pint at the Coffin or the Maggie (Magpie) on the way. I don't think I suffered from having to stand at the door and watch in awe as the big man sank his one pint in double quick time. The name the Foresters Arms survives on a pub in Askew Road West but it has none of the style of the original.
 

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If the Central is coffin shaped whats wrong with nicknaming it the coffin bar ?
Is there a law which states just because an old defunct pub had that nickname a current pub can't have the same one :)
 

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There is a rule that it's rather lazy journalism to say that a pub "is known as the coffin" when it isn't and never has been...

Also, The Central isn't even vaguely coffin shaped - you'd need a massive head/shoulders and tiny feet to end up in a box like that.
 

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I have to say i've never heard of the central being nicknamed 'the coffin'. However the Foresters Arms was before it was razed along with almost the entire length of Askew Rd and Derwentwater Rd when the A184 was built.
 
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