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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Faro Punta Morrillo
Arecibo

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Arecibo Light (Faro de Arecibo) is a historic lighthouse located in the city of Arecibo, Puerto Rico. It is also known as "Morrillo's Lighthouse" because it is location on top of a rocky mountain known as Punta Morrillo. The lighthouse was constructed and was lit on 1898. This was the last lighthouse built by the Spanish government on the island.
The style of construction is neo classical with a rectangular shape of 40'4" wide by 84'2" long, and has attached a hexagonal tower covered by a bronze dome with a working lantern. The original lens was a third order Fresnel, with an 18 mile radius. The lighthouse was converted to electric power in 1931. Currently, it has a 190mm lens with a white flash every five seconds.
After the light was automated in 1964, the unmanned structure fell victim to decay and vandalism. The Fresnel lens was damaged in 1975 and destroyed in 1977.


Faro de Arecibo
The city of Arecibo completed the restoration of the lighthouse in 2002. The lighthouse is now part of the Arecibo Lighthouse and Historical Park that includes an Indian village, a zoo, an aquarium, and a playground. The lighthouse is home to a small museum showcasing marine artifacts, the history of the lighthouse, and the Spanish-American War.


Angel Moreno


JBF mx



Faro de Arecibo
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Faro Punta Borinquen
Aguadilla

The first Aguadilla lighthouse, locally known as Las Ruinas (the ruins), entered service on September 15, 1889. It was designed by Enrique Gadea and built by Pedro Tolosa at Point Borinquen, the northwest tip of the island. The engineers considered building the lighthouse on the higher ground where decades later its substitute was built, but concluded that the many cracks present there would make it more vulnerable to earthquakes. Lack of satisfaction with its visibility from the northeast led in 1911 to a request for funds to destroy it and build a new lighthouse.
In 1918, before work on the new lighthouse had started, a strong earthquake severely damaged the tower and weakened the rest of the structure to the point that shortly afterwards it was closed and abandoned, to the ravages of the weather and vandalism. Today the only remains of this elegant lighthouse, which measured 91 feet long and 41 feet wide, are the front facade and one lateral wall. We can nevertheless have the illusion of visiting it through its twin brother, the Maunabo lighthouse; these two structures were distinguished only by their color and the details of the tower’s cornice, which in the Aguadilla lighthouse exhibited elaborate Moorish details. The building was painted red and white, part of the red paint, now very bleached by the sun, remains on the stucco of the front wall. The octagonal tower was 45 feet high and was located at the center of the building. The fourth-order lens, destroyed by the earthquake, projected its light twelve miles away, illuminating the northwest tip of Puerto Rico and the entrance to the Mona Passage.


angel moreno


myn91



Faro Original
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Faro Punta Borinquen
Aguadilla


The second Aguadilla lighthouse entered service in 1922, substituting the original lighthouse destroyed by an earthquake in 1918. It was constructed little more than a mile away from the first lighthouse and over 200 feet above sea level, on the area then known as Punta Gorda. Here the light was more visible to the ships that sailed from Europe to the Panama Canal. This tower is 60 feet tall and does not connect to the keepers’ residence, which measures 56 feet long by 40 feet wide.
The third-order lens was constructed by the Macbeth Company in New York and projected its light 18 miles away. As in the other lighthouses, the weights that rotated the lens descended through the column of the spiral iron stairway. In 1947 the lantern was removed and the lens was substituted by a pair of search lights more appropriate for air travel, since by then the lighthouse was located in the Ramey Air Force base. Years later these lights were substituted by the smaller pair used today. The tower was finally automated in 1976. Access to the lighthouse grounds is limited to Coast Guard employees who rent the residence. The living rooms of both apartments conserve the white, gray, and black tiles installed in 1922. The lighthouse can be observed from the entrance gate and from the adjacent golf course.


Biblioteca UPR Aguadilla


Mauricio Larranaga
 

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FAROS DE PUERTO RICO​



Puerto Rico Lighthouses
De que año es este mapa?

Jaykar. He estado bien involucrado en el USCG Auxiliary Reserve desde principios de los 90s. Una de mis actividades favoritas es Light House Detail. Mi otro gran hobby son los mapas, cartografias y cartas marinas. Ponlos juntos, y me diste donde me duele. Por eso el afán con este hilo. Como caramelo para un niño.

Muchas gracias!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
De que año es este mapa?

Jaykar. He estado bien involucrado en el USCG Auxiliary Reserve desde principios de los 90s. Una de mis actividades favoritas es Light House Detail. Mi otro gran hobby son los mapas, cartografias y cartas marinas. Ponlos juntos, y me diste donde me duele. Por eso el afán con este hilo. Como caramelo para un niño.

Muchas gracias!

Realmente desconozco de que año es el mapa. Verifique el website donde lo consegui y tampoco dice pero si te fijas muy bien en el mismo, incluso aparece la ruta del sistema de ferrocarril que una vez tuvimos a nivel isla. Eso nos puede dar un hint.

Me alegra que el thread sea del agrado de ustedes :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Faro Punta Higüero
Rincón

The first lighthouse constructed on Punta Higüero was activated on January 13, 1893 to help guide mariners through the Mona Passage, separating Puerto Rico from Mona Island. The tower's lantern room originally housed a sixth-order, Barbier and Benard Fresnel lens with six flash panels, which displayed a light at a focal plane of sixty-nine feet. An oil lamp was used as the first light source, but this was upgraded to a more powerful oil-vapor lamp in 1913.

Its Mediterranean appearance came from an elaborate combination of exposed and indented brick work in the faces – around doors and windows – and corners. The “castle” look was further emphasized by reddish stucco imitating stone-work on all facades and the very elaborate exposed brick cornice topped by a parapet built in lace-like brick-work.
The Punta Higuero Lighthouse was severely damaged by an earthquake that struck the area on October 11, 1918, but it was not affected by the tsunami associated with the quake due to its bluff-top location. The nearby lighthouse at Punta Borinquen was rendered unusable by the double blow of the earthquake and tsunami.

An inspection of the Punta Higüero Lighthouse following the tremor found two serious cracks in the tower that extended clear through the brickwork and were located two and eight feet above the roof of the dwelling. Other cracks were found in the arches above the windows and doors in the exterior walls, and a great deal of plaster had fallen from the walls. The dwelling was vacated, not being considered safe for occupancy by the keepers, and $30,000 was requested to construct a replacement lighthouse out of reinforced concrete.

Congress appropriated $24,000 in July of 1919 for rebuilding the lighthouse. As bids for the project exceeded this amount, workers in the lighthouse district and hired labor were used. The Annual Report of the Commissioner of Lighthouses for 1922, gives the following description of the new station.

The tower is of reinforced concrete and consists of a cylindrical shaft 12 feet in diameter, with walls 1 foot thick, having a stepped base and supported on a square reinforced foundation 3 feet thick. A spiral stairway of precast concrete steps extends from base to top, the inner ends of the steps being supported by a hollow concrete column. A 7-foot helical bar lantern will eventually surmount the tower and contain the lens apparatus removed from the old station, but for present the old lantern is in use. The focal plane of the light is 55 feet above the ground, and 93 feet above high water.
The dwelling is a frame structure covered with asbestos shingles on the sides and roof. It contains a double set of quarters of four rooms each, with porches at each end. The dwelling is 63 feet long and 26 feet wide over all.

The new lighthouse was completed in 1921 was placed in commission on January 12, 1922. The dwelling suffered fire damage after the light was automated in 1933 and was later razed. The Punta Higüero Lighthouse now stands alone in El Faro Park, a popular spot for surfing and whale watching.





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Jaykar


Jaykar
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Faro de Isla de Mona
Isla de Mona
Mayagüez

Mona Island Light, also known as Faro de la Isla de la Mona, is a historic lighthouse located on the island of Mona, Puerto Rico, in the Mona Passage between Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic. It is the only lighthouse built of iron and steel in Puerto Rico. While some sources reported that the structure was designed by Gustav Eiffel, who also designed the Eiffel Tower in Paris, recent studies have shown that the tower was designed around 1885 by Spanish engineer Rafael Ravena.
It is the first of two lighthouses built by the U.S government in Puerto Rico.
It was first lit in 1900 and automated in 1973. In 1976, the light was deactivated and replaced by a modern beacon. The structure has deteriorated severely since deactivation. The lighthouse is listed in "Frommer's 500 Places to See Before They Disappear" and Lighthouse Digest magazine described the condition of the lighthouse as dire: "This lighthouse has to be among the most endangered in the U.S. – along with being one of the most isolated – rusting away in the tropical heat and humidity."

History

Two sets of plans were drawn up between 1885-1886 by Spanish engineer Rafael Ravena, working for the Spanish government, for a lighthouse on the eastern side of Mona Island to help mark Mona Passage, which runs between Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic. One set of plans called for a massive masonry structure with twenty five rooms for three keepers, families and supplies and a light with a range of twenty-two miles. However this was not the design that was finally used, probably to the very porous and brittle sandstone conditions of Mona Island.
The second set of plans called for an iron tower with a separate living quarters for one keeper and his family. This plan was approved in 1887, and work on the station started in the early 1890s. The lighthouse's materials were fabricated in France by Duclos & Cie. The U.S. government continued its construction after the Spanish-American War in 1898.
The lighthouse, as "Faro de la Isla de la Mona", was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1981.



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