SkyscraperCity banner

41 - 60 of 76 Posts

·
Un buen hilo...!
Joined
·
30,809 Posts
Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Faro Cayo Cardona
Isla Cardona

Ponce

Cardona Island Light (also known as Faro del Puerto de Ponce or Cayo Cardona Light) is the only 6th order lighthouse in Puerto Rico with a cylindrical attached tower. The light is located on Cardona Island, a small island on the west side of the entrance to the harbor of Ponce, Puerto Rico. It was listed in the U.S. National Register of Historic Places on October 22, 1981.

The light is located on a small 6-acre (24,000 m2) key, west of Ponce Harbor. Cayo Cardona Light is the western minor light that together with Guánica Light connects Los Morrillos Light and Caja de Muertos Light and guides the entrance to the Port of Ponce. The island is accessible only by private boat, but it can be seen from the observation tower on the La Guancha boardwalk. It is not open to the public.
It was first lit in 1889 and automated in 1962. In 1942, during World War II, its use was discontinued, but was relighted again on November 10, 1943. The light is still an active aid to navigation.

Significance

Together with Guánica Light, Cardona Light is the western minor light which connects Cabo Rojo Light and Caja de Muertos Light and guides the entrance to a port that, during the course of last century, exported millions of pounds of sugar particularly to the United States. Architecturally, it is significant that it is the only 6th order lighthouse with a cylindrical attached tower. Also, the original brick roof and firewood beams are practically intact.

Description

The lighthouse was built of stone and brick and intended for one second class keeper. The light, built in 1889, guides the entrance to the Port of Ponce, as a 6th order red fixed light.
Structurally, it followed the same construction as three other minor lights on the south and southeast shores: Punta Figuras, Punta Mulas, and Puerto Ferro. It lacks, though, the distinctive decorative elements of non-existing Punta Higuero or ruinous Guernica. Nevertheless, it possesses a charm of its own: a petite neo-classic symmetrically-balanced official design.

Cayo Cardona's dwelling was designed of stone and brick for one 2nd class keeper. A 10-meter circular tower was attached to its south facade. The structure measures some 48' x 30' x 16'. Its main entrance is on the north facade which opened into a room arrangement similar to the other minor structures of the light house and described further below. The fact that no plans of this structure have been found, and that its interior has been closed off with cement makes it difficult to describe. Only secondary references, a late 19th century photo of the site, and official references to the similar or identical design of the minor lights allows a reserved description of this particular site.
The c. 1898 photo available depicts a simple neo-classic building with a rather elaborate cornice and a simple roof parapet. Contrary to other minor lights, the tower is cylindrical, crowned by another cornice less elaborated than the dwelling's. The photograph states that the structure was painted white and light blue.
The tower's cast-iron stairway led to an octagonal glass, copper, and cast-iron lantern with vertical bars and a cast-iron balustrade surrounding an exterior cement gallery.
The original illuminating apparatus, still in use, is an 1888, 6th order fixed red lenticular lens manufactured by Sautter, Lemonnier & Company of France. It is 30 centimeters in diameter. The lens has four panels, with five elements in each panel of the central drum, and five prisms on each panel above the central drum and two below. It was held in place by a cast-iron pedestal. The original light was colored by a red chimney. The original light characteristics were modified in 1922 and 1938. In 1962 it was electrified and, apparently, unmanned.

wikipedia




ffernand
 

·
Un buen hilo...!
Joined
·
30,809 Posts
Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Faro Caja de Muertos
Isla Caja de Muertos

Ponce

Caja de Muertos Light, is an 1887 lighthouse in Ponce, Puerto Rico, that is unique amongst all other lighthouses in Puerto Rico for its unusual Lorraine cross, double-arm, T-type shape structure. The historic lighthouse is located in Caja de Muertos, an uninhabited island off the coast of Ponce, Puerto Rico. The light stands at the highest point of the island.

The light was built in 1887 by the colonial government of Spain to serve as a 3rd order lighthouse. The original lighting apparatus was built by Sautter, Lemonnier & Company lens in 1885. In 1945 the lighting was automated.The lighthouse was restored by the Puerto Rico Department of Natural Resources and houses a lookout and a museum. In 2009, the government of Puerto Rico announced plans to make Caja de Muertos Island and the this lighthouse a priority of the department.The Isla de Caja de Muertos light was a major light in both the Spanish lighthouse system of Puerto Rico as well as under American rule.

Significance

The structure is important because it is unique amongst all other lighthouses in Puerto Rico in that it has an unusual Lorraine cross, double-arm, T-type shape. The light is somewhat similar to the Isla Culebrita Light "but, in itself, is a major example of a variation within the central theme of utilitarian functions and aesthetical interpretation."

Architectural style

The light stands atop of the highest point of Caja de Muertos, Puerto Rico. The most catchy characteristic of the lighthouse is its unique and unusual Lorraine cross double-arm "T" shape.
Within this structure, the main entrance opens to a small vestibule. The vestibule in itself is a section of a 12 x 1 meter long corridor which led to the keeper's quarters. The entrance to the tower, which has a 3.9 meter square base located in the center of the structure, is across the main entrance. On both sides of the tower base there were two 4.74m x 4.55m rooms one which served as the engineer's room and the other as a storeroom. North of the tower base the oil room was located. This one measures 3.6m x 1.5m. Therefore, from west to east a structural connection is formed by the storeroom, towers' base, oil room, engineer's room, and the corridor. This section links the keeper's quarters. These were arranged into two parallel sections running north to south and oriented of identical dimensions.
In order of disposition, first, came the living room, measuring 4.9m x 3.4m, followed by two sleeping rooms, measuring 3.5m x 3.5m each, and a kitchen-dining area, also 3.5m x 3.5m. The last three rooms connected to a 8.9m x 1m long corridor which reached the bathrooms. Each living room had three windows, the kitchens have two windows, and the dormitories, storeroom, and engineer's quarters had one window each.
The tower is a massive cylindrical structure, of 19m high—including the lantern—by a 2.5m inside diameter. It terminates in rectangular bracket-supporters for the cement circular gallery and cast-iron balustrade that encloses the cast-iron, copper, and glass 3rd order lantern. A cast-iron spiral stairway also led to the lantern that had vertical bars.

The original illuminating apparatus was a 1885, lenticular 3rd order lens, manufactured by Sautter, Lemonnier & Company of France. The central drum measured 1 meter in diameter. It had six panels of which three were flashing panels. In each panel of the central drum there were seven elements; each panel above central drum had eleven prisms and four prisms below. The flashes were produced by the central revolving drum mounted on a chariot activated by a clock work system. The clock cord descended through the central column in the stairway. The mechanism was protected by a circular iron and glass case. The original light characteristic showed a white flash every 3 seconds and had an 18-mile range. In 1923 the light characteristics were changed. In 1945 the light was electrified. It was also changed into an automatic, unwatched light that exhibited the original characteristics. The structure was abandoned and boarded up. The lens was replaced by a 500mm lens. No record has been found which indicates that major structural changes or alterations were introduced in the dwelling. The decorative elements are purely neo-classic especially its cornices and pediment.

wikipedia


fuente


~Josue
 

·
Un buen hilo...!
Joined
·
30,809 Posts
Discussion Starter · #48 · (Edited)
Añadi nuevas fotos en las primeras paginas!!! :)

Estuve buscando informacion respecto a los faros de Isla de Desecheo (Aguadilla) y el de Mayagüez. Segun el mapa del primer post esos dos faros existieron pero no he logrado encontrar informacion al respecto. Es por ello que no he traido nada al foro. Mientras tanto continuare proximamente con el faro de Arroyo.
 

·
Un buen hilo...!
Joined
·
30,809 Posts
Discussion Starter · #49 · (Edited)
Faro Punta Figuras
Arroyo

Punta de las Figuras Light (Spanish: Faro Punta de las Figuras) is an historic lighthouse located in Arroyo, Puerto Rico. It was first lit by the Spanish government in 1893. The light was relocated in 1938, and the structure was deactivated and abandoned. During World War II, the lighthouse was used as a lookout. After the U.S army abandoned the structure in 1963, the lighthouse was repeatedly vandalized. In 1969 the lens and lantern were destroyed.
In 2003, the Puerto Rican government rehabilitated the lighthouse at a cost of two million dollars. The lighthouse is located at the entrance of the "Balneario Punta Guilarte" beach resort managed by the Puerto Rico National Parks Company.

Fotos de los alrededores del faro

wikipedia



fuente


fuente
 

·
Un buen hilo...!
Joined
·
30,809 Posts
Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Faro Punta Tuna
Maunabo

Punta Tuna Light is a historic lighthouse located in the southeast of the town of Maunabo, Puerto Rico on a sharp promontory at the southeastern most point of the island. It was first lit in 1892 and automated in 1989. The light was a third order lighthouse that served as primary light connecting the island's southern and eastern lights system. The design was drawn and laid out by Joaquin Gisbert in 1890. The Lighthouse construction was initially overseen by Adrian Duffaut. It was built in the period of March 13, 1891 to September 29 of 1893. Final construction was taken over by Spanish Body of Engineers according to annotations of the historian Carlos Moral. Originally named Faro de Mala Pascua after the Cape to the west. Moved and renamed after the Point of the construction site so the light could perform a double duty warning ships off the Sargent reef.

August 8, 1899 the lighthouse suffered the fury of hurricane San Ciriaco, but was safe.; The town sufferers heavy damage.

1900 (12 April) An Act of Congress (31 Stat. L., 77, 80) extended the jurisdiction of the Lighthouse Service to the noncontiguous territory of Puerto Rico and adjacent American waters.

1900 (1 May) The Lighthouse Board took charge of the Puerto Rico lighthouses.

September 13, 1928, Devastating Hurricane San Felipe II strikes, again the lighthouse stands firm, but the town housing is nearly totally destroyed.

It was listed in the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1981.

In 2007, the government of Puerto Rico bought an area near the lighthouse to create a conservation area.The structure is being restored by the town of Maunabo and is open to the public. The light is still active aid to navigation.

In June 2011, the General Services Administration made the Punta Tuna Light (along with 11 others) available at no cost to public organizations willing to preserve them.

wikipedia


erodgz


Myn91
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,699 Posts
Todos estos faros están operando? Por supuesto el de Guánica no. Yo se que los de Caja de Muertos y Cayo Cardona sí porque los he visto.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,922 Posts
Durante mi tiempo en el Auxiliary Coast Guard, me toco bastante "Light house detail" en el Faro de Punta Tuna, Cardona, y Caja de Muertos. Tengo entendido que el USCG le iba a pasar el faro de Maunabo al estado. Mi faro favorito by far!
 

·
Un buen hilo...!
Joined
·
30,809 Posts
Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Wow, there are lots of lighthouses in this country. I wanna see atleast one and see what is usage of this. I am really excited to see this and I am looking forward to see one of those lighthouses.
If you ever visit Puerto Rico let us know :)
 
41 - 60 of 76 Posts
Top