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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
An article I read from Demographia says a successful urban railway system(high rates of usage) requires two things to be met: a large centralized business district, and relatively high density

Examples are Tokyo, NYC and London, these cities all have HUGE downtowns and relatively dense population.

Taipei surely is densely populated, but it looks like there is not a centralized CBD in Taipei. 信義區 could be one but is definitely not comparable with central Tokyo or Manhattan. Overall metropolitan Taipei doesn't have a highly centralized commercial district, everything is kind of mixed. Even Hong Kong has a central district(accompanied by high density developmen) to support a highly used subway system. I'm quite curious about how 捷運 in Taipei would work successfully without a CBD?

By the way, do you think the urban rail system in Taipei is successful?
I heard from one of my friends in Taipei that scooter users outnumbered rail-transport users in Taipei, though people still keep saying 捷運 in Taipei is so convenient?!
 

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By the way, do you think the urban rail system in Taipei is successful?
I heard from one of my friends in Taipei that scooter users outnumbered rail-transport users in Taipei, though people still keep saying 捷運 in Taipei is so convenient?!

i think xinyi is supposed to be a newly developing cbd. they're building alot of commercial buildings there.

alot of people still ride scooters because they are too lazy to walk, not because the public transit is poor. when i visited taipei, i was told by some taiwanese friends there that taiwanese in general don't like to walk; they'd rather scooter over a few blocks rather than walk and/or take public transportation. their dislike for walking is similar to the attitude of those in los angelenos who prefer to drive 2 blocks to go to the supermarket rather than walking. taipei has a much better and expansive subway/bus/public transit sytem than los angeles, that's for sure. when i stayed in taipei, i found it very convenient to walk and take public transit. i even got my friends to walk with me rather than drive or take the scooter. it takes time to change people's mentality. but more and more people are taking public transit and in the future perhaps taipei will become a predominantly pedestrian city like new york city. it's got a first rate subway system that's ever expanding and now it's got the high speed train system.
 

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中華民國
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Walking can be attractive depending on the season. It's almost unthinkable to walk outside from April to October when it's like sauna outside. But from November to March it can be quite nice.

Whenever I go back to Taipei, I take the MRT 80% of the time, walk about 10-15% of the time and only take taxi when I really needed it, which is quite rare.
 

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Chop your passport!!!
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
But why aren't so many scooters found in Tokyo, Hong Kong and New York, where most people either walk to take public transport, or drive 4-wheel cars? Why didn't the shortage of land in Tokyo and Hong Kong force car-users to switch to scooters? It's quite interesting that the popularity of scooters in Taiwan is uniquely high among the developed world, why is it this case?

And besides exanding the public transport network, does the municipal government also encourage commuters to ride bicycles instead of air-polluting scooters like Amsterdam?
 

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中華民國
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But why aren't so many scooters found in Tokyo, Hong Kong and New York, where most people either walk to take public transport, or drive 4-wheel cars? Why didn't the shortage of land in Tokyo and Hong Kong force car-users to switch to scooters? It's quite interesting that the popularity of scooters in Taiwan is uniquely high among the developed world, why is it this case?
Taipei, Tokyo, Hong Kong and New York all had different development history...

I won't go into too much with the other three cities but Taipei became more developed during the 70's and 80's during Taiwan's economy boom. During that time, scooters and motorcycles were more popular as they were cheaper, take up less space and unless you want to make long trips (as in out of the city), there is really no need for cars.

Have you even been to Taipei? You make it sound like no one takes the MRT and no on drives four-wheel vehicles lol :lol: :eek:hno:

And besides exanding the public transport network, does the municipal government also encourage commuters to ride bicycles instead of air-polluting scooters like Amsterdam?
There are some anti-pollution campaigns in Taiwan but I'm not sure if there are any specific to riding bikes over scooters. If there aren't, there ought to be.
 

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Chop your passport!!!
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Have you even been to Taipei? You make it sound like no one takes the MRT and no on drives four-wheel vehicles lol :lol: :eek:hno:
I'm just referring to the majority, not being absolute.
Besides, you won't find so many scooters running in the arterial streets of Tokyo or Hong Kong right? It's just a comparison.
 

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ya i've always wondered why other cities don't have a large population riding scooters like those in taiwan. like how come people in seoul don't ride scooters? i think for one thing new york and tokyo's transportation systems are larger and more expansive than those in taiwanese cities. and their public transit was developed earlier than taiwan's - nyc's subway system was built around 1900 - while taipei constructed hers in the 1990s. by that time, most taiwanese had relied on scooters for decades as a cheaper and convenient form of transportation as opposed to cars.

i think rome also has a large scooter population. preferably, i would like to see a ban on scooters in taiwan. i think they're a nuisance, dangerous and add to noise and air pollution.
 

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A Taiwanese in U.S.
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I think another factor is the climate. For cities like Tokyo or NYC, it's not comfortable to ride a scooter or motorcycle during the winter. That discourages people from buying one for commute.
Of course, this is not the only factor. But I bet if you move Taipei to the same latitude with, say, Seoul, there will be much less people using scooters or motorcycles.
 

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Tears of Buddha
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Scooters and bikes in Taiwan are one of my favorite citycapes of Taiwan.
That's why bikes made in Taiwan are superior in quality.
Now more and more environment-minded people in Tokyo are riding bikes insted of using subways in commuting as Germans do , and using motorcycles instead of cars in leisure.
I'm always wondring why the peple in Seoul don't use bikes, motorcycles and even light-cars such as smart car. Riding a bike or a motorcycle is much fun rather than a car! In Tokyo those who are fully dependent on cars are somtimes regarded as uneducated.
 

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i think it's smarter to ride in a car than on a scooter/motorcycle because one is MUCH safer in an enclosed car than on a scooter/motorcycle. they're just dangerous, man!! especially in congested, dense and traffic-prone cities like tokyo and taipei. riding a scooter/motorcycle in the country for a leisurely trip is another story.
 

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Don Pedro-Lorenzo
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not sure that everybody agree with you when they're blocked in their cars in an obstruction. and it's not a chance that scooters have that many customers in taipei.

by the way, i think the taipei urban rail system runs quite well (maybe better than a lot of european cities' subway systems), customers are generally satisfied (except some serious accidents..), stations and railcars're very clean, and i can even say that tapei MRT is one of the public infrastructures that taipeite're most proud of...the human sciences're not exact sciences and the mistake margin exists for the drawn rules by their methods.
 

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Tears of Buddha
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footway is for pedestrians;
driveway is not only for cars but also for bikes and scooters/motorcycles.


As the people are switching to bikes in commuting in Tokyo, the roads in Tokyo are becoming bikers-friendly by degrees, in answer to citizens' voice. And more and more people are driving cars politely thanks to increasing bikers.
Before, the people rode to the nearest station on cheap bikes, but now people ride the fashinable bikes to the offices at a distance of 10 - 15km in Central Tokyo. Riding a bike is extremely healthy, earth-friendly and even faster than subways in Tokyo! (In fact riding bikes to work is much more expensive than using subways: you need bike wear in additon to business suites, supplement, helmet and bike gloves, and the maintenance of bike.)
And by riding bikes, the people are bringing the environmental concerns up in their consciousness. Today in Tokyo, bicycle magazines are more popular than auto magazines. And the Tokyoites consider the bike the trendy tool definitely.

In most of the cities in Asia, it seems to me that the roads are wider tha those of Tokyo, but are taken over by arrogant cars, and the road structures are far from bike-friendly.

From my own experience, Taiwan's roads are designed bike-friendly because the people use scooters/motorcycles. I really wish more and more Taiwanese ride bikes instead of scooters/motorcycles since Taiwan is world's NO.1 bike producer.

riding to work on a bike in LONDON
 

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Taipei's bus system was doing well before MRT was introduced.

Taipei's population is very concentrated(not to mention..a lot of ppl living in Taoyuan commute to Taipei everyday).
There are about 6 million ppl squeezed in basins and valleys in Taipei area. It's a better place for public transits than a city which has 10 million ppl, but so spread out.
 

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中華民國
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Taipei's population is very concentrated(not to mention..a lot of ppl living in Taoyuan commute to Taipei everyday).
Very good point. When I stayed in Taiwan in 2004, I lived in Taoyuan half the time with my cousins and every morning I'd take a short taxi ride to the Taoyuan train station and it would take me straight to Taipei Main Station, which is connected to the MRT system. It made my commute very smooth and fast.
 

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you know before a train departs, they play a sound?

at taipei main station and most other stations, they have this loud chime, but at stations to the south of taipei like xindian and jingan, they play this cute melodious tune, similar to those in tokyo.

why is that? just curious...
 
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