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Ah thanks for looking Newcastle Historian. The ornate building is quite interesting as I'm assuming the rest of the street would have looked similar to North Street and Saville Row. I'd found a written description of Lisle Street from 1828 which described it as a quiet street - so quiet it was forgotten about :lol:

I'm interested in what the 'proposed roads' are on the map.

Of the proposed (projected) streets on the map, the big one north of Lisle Street, appears to be Northumberland Road, and the one opposite old Eldon Square, appears to be Clayton Street, which until 1976 used to intersect with Blackett street at that point!

One other 'projected street' that is actually not shown on the map as such, would be Grey Street of course, running South from Blackett Street through Anderson Place. Also, Grainger Street is not yet shown (as 'projected') either.

 

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appears to be Clayton Street, which until 1976 used to intersect with Blackett street at that point!

Different line, though: it terminates at Nun's Lane, whereas Clayton Street crosses Newgate Street further north.
 

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appears to be Clayton Street, which until 1976 used to intersect with Blackett street at that point!

Different line, though: it terminates at Nun's Lane, whereas Clayton Street crosses Newgate Street further north.

True, but these were just 'planned/projected' streets, at the time this map was produced, reality may have turned out slightly, or totally, different. The rest of Clayton Street and all of Grainger, Grey and all the many other 'Graingertown' streets, are not even shown as 'projected' yet.
 

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At that time, the "Happy Chippy" was on the corner opposite, on the north side of Waterloo Street.
Small Picture here from Happy Chippy facebook page

There had been difficulties in aquiring all the old properties there for the developments between Waterloo Street and Blenheim St (now St James Bvd.).
I remember that place now, used to be next to (sort of) the old Marlbrough Social Club.

Doesn't seem like anyone else remember anything about the building in question though. Shame as it's always fascinated me. Thanks for your info though DX
 

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Whatever happened to Geordie Jeans?
The coolest jeans in toon
December 2nd 2004, Liz Hands, The Journal


Fashion in the 80s was all about ra-ra skirts, shoulder pads, batwing jumpers, leg warmers, pixie boots and - in the North-East - Geordie Jeans. At a time when job losses were rife in the region's rag trade, the label was the success story of the decade.

Founded in 1978 at the Rekendyke factory in South Shields Industrial estate by entrepreneur Derek Robson, in its heyday there were 10 Geordie Jeans shops across the North-East.

The company started the first cut-price jeans war - boasting the cheapest denims in the country back in 1980 at £6.99 a pair. It is that ruthless competition which has ironically led to the end of the Geordie Jeans empire, with the closure of the last shop in the chain in South Shields.

Derek blamed supermarkets like Asda and Tesco for selling jeans at £4 a pair, exorbitant rents and high taxes for the shut down. But, even though the brand is no more, everyone who was a pupil of the 1980s will probably have some memories of wearing Geordie Jeans.

Hilary McGloughlin, who now works as a senior lecturer in fashion design and marketing at Northumbria University, was one of the label's designers in the early 80s. "Everyone was wearing them at the time," she says. "We couldn't make them fast enough. We did this GJ logo on the back pockets, which was my handwriting.

"For me, it was fantastic to go out and see so many people wearing my designs. But it was really weird to see my handwriting walking down Northumberland Street on someone's bottom."

Hilary was working at Geordie Jeans at the height of the brand's popularity.

"When I started in 1981 or 1982, there was the South Shields shop and the Grainger Street shop in Newcastle had just opened," she recalls. "It was manic. I remember people queuing down the street and being let in six at a time so it didn't become too crowded.

"It was all about getting a fantastic cut for the jeans. We did cuts for everyone right from the pot-bellied builder for whom we used to cut the denim low down at the front so their belly could hang over, to the Olivia Newton-John look, which was the absolute must at the time.

"That's why stretch denim was brought in. Everyone wanted their jeans as skin-tight as possible and we put different embroidery on the back pockets for each different style.

"Price was the reason they were so popular. It was the first time fashionable jeans had been affordable for everyone. It wasn't because they were manufactured cheaply and it wasn't because it was cheap denim. We were sourcing our denim from exactly the same place Levis were getting theirs. The quality was there.

"We were turning out hundreds of thousands of pairs. It was good quality being made in a local factory by local girls who were proud of the name.

"I remember having washing instructions which were normal on one side and on the other they'd be written in Geordie by the same people who do the Larn Yarsel Geordie books. We'd also have Christmas cards saying something like `Ha' yarsel a canny Christmas.'

"That was a really brave move at the time, to do something fairly unusual because Derek Robson was so proud of the origins of his product.

"And we didn't need any major advertising campaign. We never had the glossy kind of pictures with models in Geordie Jeans. We didn't need it. It was all word of mouth."

The popularity of Geordie Jeans was particularly remarkable when you consider how the firm started. "Derek came up with the idea with his two brothers," explains Hilary. "He wondered why jeans had to be so expensive. He went into his bank and got a loan for one roll of denim, got a local woman to make that up, then went back into the bank with the money and asked for another loan so he could buy two rolls.

"It all started from a terraced house in South Shields. He used to have the cutting tables upstairs and the machines downstairs, until the equipment got too heavy and the ceiling fell in. Then he had to move to proper factory premises."

The Geordie Jeans factory eventually closed in 1999, with the loss of 23 machinists' jobs, and the number of shops was gradually reduced until the last shop in South Shields shut its doors last month.

After announcing the closure, Derek said: "My decision was that I can't go on forever losing money. "We already saw the demise of the coal mines and the shipyards. Now machinists who make clothes are forced out of jobs because it is cheaper to make clothes abroad.

"Making people who have worked for you for more than 20 years redundant is not a nice thing to do. I would just like to thank all the people who have shopped with us and worked with us throughout the years."

Hilary adds: "It's very sad for the area for lots of reasons. Yes, I'm sad myself because it was part of my working life, but it's also sad now for all of us working to train potential designers at Northumbria University and it's a tragedy for everyone who has lost their jobs."

Now, Geordie Jeans has been consigned, along with other 80s trends, to fashion history.
 

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The Legend
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Thanks for the info guys.

Interesting to hear about a local company that was oncefairly big. Jeans are becoming even more popular then ever, so it's a shame that it couldn't of lived through the difficult times for jeans.
 

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Can anyone help me with the history of this building?

It's on Waterloo Street, just up from the traffic lights at the junction with Westmoreland Road.



The upper 2 floors have recently been converted to a "City Express" budget hotel and part of the lower floor has always been from my memory the "Happy Chippy".

Until recently, i'm sure there were signs in the 1st floor window suggesting a nightclub called "Manhatten's or something like that, and there is evidence in the left hand side windows of a bar, possibly called "Presidential"?

The front seems to be a selection of stairways, both up and down and the break in the footpath, in front of the chippy entrance kind of suggests there used to be some kind of archway/cart entrance in there at some point.

Anyone know what the building used to be in the dim and distant past?
Years back it was a warehouse, but i've no idea who it belonged to.
 

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cogito ergo sum
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Waterloo Street

Can anyone help me with the history of this building?

It's on Waterloo Street, just up from the traffic lights at the junction with Westmoreland Road.

Anyone know what the building used to be in the dim and distant past?
I've just stumbled across these pics of the building, possibly from around 1995 (or later - looking again at the curve of Centre for Life in the background), on the excellent photo gallery by Tim Pickford-Jones at www.timmonet.co.uk/html/waterloo.htm. There's even a picture of the Essoldo cinema which stood at the east end of Waterloo Street on there. I recommend his site to anyone interested in Newcastle over the past few decades!








Now that I ponder that picture a little more, I'm beginning to remember the sound of machines from the upper windows on warm days - not just at the front but also down the side. I seem to recall assuming that they were sewing machines - in other words, the upper floor were part of the "rag trade" which occupied a lot of factory and warehouse units just a little further west , around Blandford Street. But I may have guessed wrongly.

Hope this helps, Stamford!
 

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Southeast Geordie
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I've just stumbled across these pics of the building, possibly from around 1995 (or later - looking again at the curve of Centre for Life in the background), on the excellent photo gallery by Tim Pickford-Jones at www.timmonet.co.uk/html/waterloo.htm. There's even a picture of the Essoldo cinema which stood at the east end of Waterloo Street on there. I recommend his site to anyone interested in Newcastle over the past few decades!
It is a great resource and is already in our 'local history' website list :eek:kay:
 

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I've just stumbled across these pics of the building, possibly from around 1995 (or later - looking again at the curve of Centre for Life in the background), on the excellent photo gallery by Tim Pickford-Jones at www.timmonet.co.uk/html/waterloo.htm. There's even a picture of the Essoldo cinema which stood at the east end of Waterloo Street on there. I recommend his site to anyone interested in Newcastle over the past few decades!








Now that I ponder that picture a little more, I'm beginning to remember the sound of machines from the upper windows on warm days - not just at the front but also down the side. I seem to recall assuming that they were sewing machines - in other words, the upper floor were part of the "rag trade" which occupied a lot of factory and warehouse units just a little further west , around Blandford Street. But I may have guessed wrongly.

Hope this helps, Stamford!
Excellent DX thank you. It's certainly been re-modelled quite a bit since those pictures. Thanks
 

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Something for the long term boozers in the city.

I know of Blacket Arms on Nelson Street and Black Garter on Clayton Street.

But where is/was The Black Swan?

Is it one of the two above, in a previous incarnation, or is it no longer?

The picture suggests clayton Street 1971, and it looks like it's around Grainger Market.

Any help appreciated.



Image from Newcastle Libraries stream on flikr
 

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cogito ergo sum
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Something for the long term boozers in the city.

I know of Blacket Arms on Nelson Street and Black Garter on Clayton Street.

But where is/was The Black Swan?
The Black Swan is the cellar bar in the Newcastle Arts Centre, which you access from Black Swan Court - the courtyard in the centre of the Arts Centre complex. That's at the foot of Westgate Road (as if we didn't know).
The pub is not currently open unless there is an event or activity in the venue there. Its a nice little bar - excellent for private hires for corporate or arts events, parties or gigs, with or without its bigger venue room and I'd pop in after work if it was open regularly. And its privately owned - not a chain or franchise.
http://www.newcastle-arts-centre.co.uk/blackswan.htm

There may have been another Black Swan that I don't know of; and the present day Black Swan is certainly not connected to the one in that picture (presumably from the 1970's). There's a few more Black Swans in Northumberland, and, sadly, there's now quite a few in Louisiana.
 

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Thanks DX.

Yes I know where the current Black Swan is, on Westgate Road. A very quaint little cellar bar, but as you say, very rarely open.

.

I'm just very confused where the one in the original picture is. The windows etc. look very similar to those in The Black Garter, but the pub looks 1/2 or maybe even 1/3 the size of the current Black Garter.

The only other existing location I can equate it to, is the Ladbrokes betting shop, a little further along Clayton Street towards Nun Street.

The photo on Flikr gives a date of 1971
 

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Something for the long term boozers in the city.

I know of Blacket Arms on Nelson Street and Black Garter on Clayton Street.

But where is/was The Black Swan?

Is it one of the two above, in a previous incarnation, or is it no longer?

The picture suggests clayton Street 1971, and it looks like it's around Grainger Market.

Any help appreciated.



Image from Newcastle Libraries stream on flikr

Yes, I am one of the long-term boozers! I remember the Black Swan, and it wasn't one of my favourite places by a long way, but a good mate of mine knew the landlord (may have been a relative) and we got the occasional 'lock-in' there, in my very early days around the town.

Your photo does indeed show the very distinctive buildings of Clayton Street, around the entrances to the Grainger market.

The Black Swan was merged with the Star & Garter (which I also remember) in the late seventies and the rest is explained in the below extract from Heady days - A History of Newcastle Public Houses (Vol 1 the Central Area) by Brian Bennison . . .

 

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Newcastle College of Art & Design

I always struggle to recall what "The Art School" looked like. Does anyone have any pictures?
It was on Bath Lane and I used to pass it regularly. I seem to recall it had an impressive bulk, but very unimpressive design, architecturally.

I think the building began life in the 1880's as a John Rutherford College and maybe changed name a few times, eventually becoming incorporated into the Polytechnic (now UNN), though being in Bath Lane you'd think it might have become absorbed into Newcastle College.

I can't seem to find any pictures and don't even hear it referred to much - I'm sure there must be many people around who studied there, though all will be in their 50's or over by now! (Studied? Did Art School students in the 1960's do much studying? Only joking, of course.)
 

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Bulmer Street, Gallowgate Area

Hi All

Was hoping someone would be able to help. I was directed to this site from a google search for Bulmer Street, Newcastle, but can't seem to find anything now I'm here?

My Father in Law lived in Bulmer Street, which was where the St. James Metro Station is now (beside Gallowgate), he would love to see photos of this street. I have found 3 on the City Libraries (I think) Flickr site, but was hoping someone would have something else.

By the way, I've looked all the way through this thread and think it's great, and amazing how much info you all know.

Hope someone can help.

Broony
 
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