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Bodega

It's also been likened to a mosque :) and was widely rumoured to have been one . I remember looking into this a while ago and there was nothing to support either. I seem to remember it having a theatrical connection, but others probably know better than me.
Brian Bennison to the rescue once again - from his book "Lost Weekends - A History of Newcastle's Public House - Volume 3 - the West".

The Bodega was originally The Black Bull Inn, bought by Sir John Fitzgerald and re-opened in 1995 as the Bodega.

Perhaps dating from at least 1862 it was once owned by Jacob Wilkinson who brewed his own beer in the three story building at the rear. Evidently when the Pavillion Theatre was being built (on the site of another pub called The Pineapple) the excavations for its foundations caused the brew house to collapse.

In Brian's book "Brewers and Bottlers of Newcastle upon Tyne from 1850 to the present day" he has a paragraph on Jacob Wilkinson and adds that the collapsed brewery building was rebuilt and re-equipped in 1903 and he entertained 100 friends to celebrate its opening.

Evidently Wilkinson died in 1905 and the Inn and Brewery went to auction but failed to meet the asking price - presumably it lay empty until the SJF acquisition?

 

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Brian Bennison to the rescue once again - from his book "Lost Weekends - A History of Newcastle's Public House - Volume 3 - the West".

The Bodega was originally The Black Bull Inn, bought by Sir John Fitzgerald and re-opened in 1995 as the Bodega.

Perhaps dating from at least 1862 it was once owned by Jacob Wilkinson who brewed his own beer in the three story building at the rear. Evidently when the Pavillion Theatre was being built (on the site of another pub called The Pineapple) the excavations for its foundations caused the brew house to collapse....
Nice one. So that building post dates the burial ground and synagogue by quite a while. Looking at the pics if you combine the domes and the Moorish arches I can see how you get to a mosque or synagogue.

Be interested to see larger renderings of codger's pics on the tunnel, but looking at building dates it seems unlikely. Also even if you take the original plot as encompassing the entire back bit of the Stoll/Tyne it would be a hell of a construction. Might make sense if there was a narrow 'lane' or even a covered lane tho'.

You might enjoy the following [refers to a brewery on site, though it's Higginbottom].

On 7 September 1835 it was decided to purchase ground for a cemetery and members agreed to double their subscriptions. They acted quickly and a few weeks later, on 22 October, at a meeting held at the 'Black Boy',it was reported that a parcel of land measuring 250 square yards, at 5s. per yard, had been purchased from Mr. Anderson, in Thornton Street, in Westgate Street, in the county of Northumberland—that is, outside the town walls.

Since those days the city's boundaries have been widely extended and the little cemetery is now the courtyard of Messrs. Higginbottom's Brewery, in the heart of the city. As access to another part of the premises is across the cemetery, a raised pathway about six feet wide constructed along one side constitutes a right of way. The burial ground is treated with due respect. Various attempts have been made to beautify it with shrubs and plants, but because of the enclosing high walls nothing will grow.

There is an ash tree which buds at its upper reaches where the sun can penetrate. The northern boundary of the burial ground was originally part of the Old Tyne Theatre, later the Stoll Cinema.

A few years ago, Messrs. Goldwater, the owners of Waterloo House, an adjoining building, bought the part of the cinema abutting on the cemetery for an extension to their premises, involving work on this wall. The Brewery management insisted that a platform should be erected to cover the consecrated ground, so that no ladders should be placed on it nor builders' refuse be allowed to fall and make the ground untidy or, perhaps, damage the gravestones.

The graves, whose number is unknown, are in rows from east to west, with access from the south side. Against the north wall there are two worn stumps of former gravestones and one fairly complete, with part of the inscription still legible. In front of this is another stone, also partly legible, while a further stone, after having fallen down some thirty years ago, was set up against the west wall. The fall occurred during the night of a very heavy storm.

On the following morning, Colonel Higginbottom, the managing director of the brewery, dictated a letter to . be sent to the Leazes Park Road Congregation, stating that the stone had collapsed as a result of the strong winds. Through a typist's error, the 'd' in 'winds' was substituted by an 'e' and the resultant letter—no doubt to the Hon. Officers' intense surprise—read that the stone had collapsed through thenight because of the 'strong wines'.

The cemetery, including the raised right of way, measures about eight yards by seven and thus falls far short of the 250 square yards mentioned in the proceedings at the time of purchase. The other part must have long been built over.
The Beginnings of the Newcastle Jewish Community*
G. D. GUTTENTAG

http://www.jhse.org/book/export/article/18280
 

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I remember having a drink in there once or twice before it was the Bodega, so it can't have been empty "until the SJF acquisition". I remember it being quite a scary place with lots of shady looking people doing "business". I think it was still called The Black Bull at the time.
 

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I remember having a drink in there once or twice before it was the Bodega, so it can't have been empty "until the SJF acquisition". I remember it being quite a scary place with lots of shady looking people doing "business". I think it was still called The Black Bull at the time.
Yes that's why I put the question mark as it seemed a long time 90 years for the place to remain unsold - must have a look at the Trade Directories to see if they throw any light on the situation :cheers:
 

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Ian Grey- Geordie Exile
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Great pic from GBDT here showing the location. It is sort of behind the theatre:
Ah, so it was where they said it was. The actual stage house is where those six rectangular things are on the roof (they are pneumatic fire vents and they used to be worked from a bar cellar style CO2 cylinder stage right).

If I remember correctly, the slightly narrower strip behind the stage was a scene dock extension which was being planned in the '70s but it needed agreement from the Jewish Cemetery custodians.

If you look at the Google Earth 1945 aerial photo, it is hard to make out but it looks like the rear buildings of Waterloo House behind the stage house were much lower than now.
 

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I used to get in the Black bull back in the 70's, even then it was also known as the Bodega.
Here is a time line going back as far as I have access to Trade Directories:

1822 – Black Bull – Margaret Lock

1834 – Black Bull – William Moore

1850 – Black Bull – W Jackson

1855 – Black Bull – T. Bell

1879 – 125 Westgate Road - Black Bull – Jacob Wilkinson

1883 – Black Bull – Jacob Wilkinson

1894 – Black Bull – Jacob Wilkinson

1921 – The Black Bull Inn – John Fitzgerald

1930 – Black Bull – Sir John Fitzgerald Ltd
 

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He was very happy. BTW for amusement, discovered that when my ancestor had the meeting to kick off the whole thing it was in the ...... Blackie Boy - which cheered me up no end :cheers:
Not to rain on your parade NH but looking at the Trade Directories for the mid 1800's there were also Black Boy pubs at Spittal Tongues, Byker Bar and of course in the Groat Market.
 

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Not to rain on your parade NH but looking at the Trade Directories for the mid 1800's there were also Black Boy pubs at Spittal Tongues, Byker Bar and of course in the Groat Market.
Oh Poo. Though as the community used to meet in Pilgrim St and were city centre based I m still hoping for the Groat Market :cheers:

If you look at the Google Earth 1945 aerial photo, it is hard to make out but it looks like the rear buildings of Waterloo House behind the stage house were much lower than now.
You're right. Much lower and more 'space' there.
 

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Not to rain on your parade NH but looking at the Trade Directories for the mid 1800's there were also Black Boy pubs at Spittal Tongues, Byker Bar and of course in the Groat Market.
There were also two Black Bulls on Westgate Road. The other - and far older - one stood on the site of the present-day Tokyo. I think this may be the one that the earlier trade directories refer to.

The one we're talking about was known locally as 'The Bodega' because it had a room that sold wine for off-sales. I believe there have been other pubs that were officially called The Bodega elsewhere in Newcastle as well.
 

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Hi,

I was just wondering if anyone had any aerial photos of the buildings that were on Pudding Chare before Parrish View was constructed? I know the the building was formerly part of the Chronicle and pubs, and I am trying to find some information on the past architecture.

Also, I am investigating the a site on St. John's Lane next to Yates' and I am currently trying to find any historic photos of the two buildings which formerly stood there.

I've had a look in the archives and found one image online, but apart from that i'm struggling...

any help would be much appreciated!


Thankyou,

Drew
 

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That WALL is indeed still there. Photo taken 27th May 2010 . .


The wall, from exactly the same angle, is much more overgrown, but its 'shape' can still be seen. The pillars and gates are still there, just to the right of my photo. I thought they were 'in shot' actually!!

Someone please correct me if I'm wrong but I'm sure the top picture is what later became the Northumbria Police Mounted Section stables. I worked there for a spell when I was 17 as a groom (1982/3.)
Just out of shot on the left hand side would be where the office/changing room etc was and the building in shot on the left was the tack room. Wooden stable blacks were built to the right and at the far end.
The white paint was no longer on the building in the 80's.

Helen
 

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Just for clarity, helenc's post refers to Jesmond's long-gone Apple Tree Inn in this post, which was in reponse to a question I had asked about that building.

I had not been aware that it had been in use as Police stables but that would be consistent with their later relocation.
 

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Someone please correct me if I'm wrong but I'm sure the top picture is what later became the Northumbria Police Mounted Section stables. I worked there for a spell when I was 17 as a groom (1982/3.)
Just out of shot on the left hand side would be where the office/changing room etc was and the building in shot on the left was the tack room. Wooden stable blacks were built to the right and at the far end.
The white paint was no longer on the building in the 80's.

Helen
Helen,
Are these not the old police stables, or at least part of them?



At the time of this photo, May 2007, they were being used by
Newcastle City Council "Community Action Training Initiative"

They were formerly part of the Jesmond Dene House set-up, now a hotel).



Both my photos.
Chris
monkchester.co.uk
 

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Ian Grey- Geordie Exile
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They were formerly part of the Jesmond Dene House set-up, now a hotel).



Chris
monkchester.co.uk
Ah, there is a familiar, almost forgotten memory.

I remember it as an upmarket Restaurant in the mid 1970s, a mate of mine had a dishwasher job there and I went along a few times to help him. (Not that he needed any help, they had a smart Hobart catering washer but they didn't like us putting the cutlery through it as it wore away the silver plate).
 

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Quick pronunciation question - We're organising a works night along the Ouseburn, and no-one could decide how the 'Ouse' is pronounced. Some pronounce it to rhyme with 'mouse', some to rhyme with 'cruise'. One lass even thinks it rhymes with 'mews', but she's from Manchester and not to be trusted.....which is it? Is there a definitive answer even?
 
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