SkyscraperCity banner

2061 - 2080 of 7535 Posts

·
Part Time Contributor
Joined
·
43,330 Posts
Snipped..

I had always assumed that Crawhall Road was named after the first Joseph Crawhall who had a rope business in St Ann's.
Yes the former Elwicks Lane was renamed in honour of Joseph Crawhall.

Joseph Crawhall purchased St Anne's Ropeworks, circa 1810 and in
addition to the works, Crawhall was very well known in the area's of
art, politics and business. It was due to his avid interest in art that
he had the very unusual chimney built. As you say it featured the
design of a coiled rope and was well known by passing sailors from all
over the World.

Joseph Crawhall went on to become Sheriff of Newcastle in 1846 and Mayor
in 1847. Crawhall was born in 1793 and died in 1853.

Joseph's son, also known as Joseph was born at Walker in 1821 and went
on to be quite a famous wood engraver and writer/publisher.

A third generation Crawhall, also called Joseph (born 1861) went on to
be a famous artist who specialised in watercolours featuring mainly
animals, many of which are on display at the Burrell Gallery.
 

·
Part Time Contributor
Joined
·
43,330 Posts
Snipped

In the bottom right at the number 4 it says "Egypt something" I have fingers crossed that Steve or NH will come in with the proper full story of how the "Egypt Cottage" got it's name.
The area around City Road/Crawhall Road was in recent history referred to as the place name Egypt. Thus The Egypt Cottage (demolished) next to Tyne Tees Studios (demolished) and the former Martin & Storey boiler works, known as Egypt Works.

Historically, the area was known as Egypt from the late 18th Century as it was an area used to store huge amounts of grain during the Napoleonic Wars. So much grain was imported that extra warehouses and silo's had to be built. Similar constructions to hold the grain had been mentioned in the Bible and thus the comparison to Egypt was made.
 

·
Part Time Contributor
Joined
·
43,330 Posts
Snipped...

While we are in the vicinity how about a picture of the Jubilee School that might have been by John Dobson and was next to the Keelman's (hence Jubilee Lodge?)
From a previous thread:
Yes NH, it was the Royal Jubilee School - Salvation Army Hostel is now on that site.

Good write up on the school @ http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=43367 which uses Historical Account of Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Including the Borough of Gateshead by Eneas Mackenzie as a source.
Some sketches and photographs @ http://history.factoidz.com/how-to-research-architectural-history/

This one by GBDT, who by the way hasn't posted for a while?

Yes NH, it was a school. At the corner of City Road and Jubilee Road. Now the Salvation Army Hostel.


P&T Image Archive, NCC

Cheers
GBDT
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,239 Posts
While we are in the vicinity how about a picture of the Jubilee School that might have been by John Dobson and was next to the Keelman's (hence Jubilee Lodge?)

Always worth a quick search through the Index Thread . . .

 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
13,075 Posts
The area around City Road/Crawhall Road was in recent history referred to as the place name Egypt. Thus The Egypt Cottage (demolished) next to Tyne Tees Studios (demolished) and the former Martin & Storey boiler works, known as Egypt Works.

Historically, the area was known as Egypt from the late 18th Century as it was an area used to store huge amounts of grain during the Napoleonic Wars. So much grain was imported that extra warehouses and silo's had to be built. Similar constructions to hold the grain had been mentioned in the Bible and thus the comparison to Egypt was made.
Hard to see in the scan but the map refers to Egypt Court.
 

·
Part Time Contributor
Joined
·
43,330 Posts
I think that the Royal Jubilee School replaced an early one that was possibly designed by John Dobson.
In Thomas Faulkner and Andrew Greg's book John Dobson Architect of the North East there is a watercolour which purports to be from Dobson himself of The Royal Jubilee School, the original painting being in the Laing Art Gallery Collection. That building was in the Greek Revival style and looks like a temple.

Built in 1810 it is noted as having been considerably altered in 1854.

Mention is made of Dobson's idea's for the building having been influenced in what he had seen in London, especially Robert Smirke's Covent Garden Theatre.
 

·
Modern Antiquarian
Joined
·
834 Posts


This map appeared on the cover of yesterday's Guardian G2 illustrating a story about the possibility of Wales leaving the UK. Does anyone else notice something odd about the part covering our region? I am sorry I cannot make it any bigger but what I noticed is fairly clear (and on the coast). You can also find it here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,714 Posts
'Durham' north of the Tyne? That makes sense, although presumably obsolete by the date of the map, Bedlingtonshire (also Islandshire and Norhamshire south of Berwick) were part of Co Durham until 1844 (also Monkshouses, a tiny portion of land near Seahouses, and the village of Crayke N of York). The map used by The Graun presumably had been made by superimposing later railways on an older unrevised base map. Interesting task to date the map itself by railway provision. No N'land Central or Allendale lines; no Settle & Carlisle; nor Boro' to Whitby (and many others not yet built).
 

·
Modern Antiquarian
Joined
·
834 Posts
I was aware of Bedlingtonshire being a detached part of Durham but it seems odd to simply put 'Durham' on the map to the north of Blyth. It might have made sense had it been in capitals to emphasize the county rather than place name.
 

·
Geordieologist
Joined
·
1,439 Posts
Steve Ellwood said:
Historically, the area was known as Egypt from the late 18th Century as it was an area used to store huge amounts of grain during the Napoleonic Wars. So much grain was imported that extra warehouses and silo's had to be built. Similar constructions to hold the grain had been mentioned in the Bible and thus the comparison to Egypt was made.
I've read this as well, the author going as far as to say the silos were pyramid- shaped, giving the area its name. Its always struck me as an odd shape for a silo.

It also made me wonder where we were importing vast quantities of grain from, when almost all of Europe was under Napoleon's control.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
13,075 Posts
Looking for some info about land uses around Crawhall Road/Coquet Street area. From what I've read years ago, there used to be leather works etc, and a fire station to the east of Crawhall Road, and a school to the west where St Dominic's Church is.

Also, did there used to be a bridge across the railway between Stoddart Street and Clarenece Street?
Here's a pic of St Dom's in construction picked up from a leaflet in the library today.

 

·
Geordieologist
Joined
·
1,439 Posts
The Egypt Cottage dates back to at least 1734. I seem to remember it appears on a map of Newcastle from that year as the Egypt Inn, which was the basis of its claim to be the city's oldest pub.

The area around it was called 'Egypt' or 'Little Egypt' on the map, so it appears to be a name of great antiquity.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
13,075 Posts
I might have asked this before, but does anyone have any knowledge of St Dominics having it's own burial ground, and if so where it might have been ?
 

·
Part Time Contributor
Joined
·
43,330 Posts
I might have asked this before, but does anyone have any knowledge of St Dominics having it's own burial ground, and if so where it might have been ?
I'm sure the answer is no and would expect that burials would take place at either All Saints Cemetery, Jesmond or Byker and Heaton Cemetery, Benton Road.
 

·
Part Time Contributor
Joined
·
43,330 Posts
When did the last keelman leave the hospital?
According to Eric Forsters booklet The Keelmen - By 1897 there was only one man, who could call himself a keelman, was resident in the Hospital. Alone among the aging ferry-men and their widows who had taken over, he made a dashing sight as he performed his duties as beadle, wearing his traditional uniform. This was Robert Stephenson, son of successive generations of keelmen, who had started work as a boy "peedee" at the age of nine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,457 Posts
Discussion Starter #2,080
The Egypt Cottage dates back to at least 1734. I seem to remember it appears on a map of Newcastle from that year as the Egypt Inn, which was the basis of its claim to be the city's oldest pub.

The area around it was called 'Egypt' or 'Little Egypt' on the map, so it appears to be a name of great antiquity.
was apparently called little egypt on account of the numerous granaries in the area, as egypt was, in biblical times, thought to house the largest granaries in the world. in fact mant europeans thought the pyramids were just big granaries until fairly recently.

EDIT: see this has already been covered further up the page.
 
2061 - 2080 of 7535 Posts
Top