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Helen,

Here are some photos of Vine Lane from 1935. Hope you see your Grandparents house


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Just love these NCC photographs of slum clearances in Newcastle but something I've noticed is that they always look as though taken on a gray and dismal day :)

Am I correct in my thinking that the photographs were taken as an audit trail to prove to Central Government that the buildings actually existed due to compensation payments being met centrally?
 

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Hello again

I am confident that someone out there will have pictures of Silver Street off Pandon Bank? my maternal grandparents - the Barningham's had family there.

Many thanks!
 

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What is the large crenellated building?

F
I've had a look at the Directories from around that time and cannot see much to explain the building. It looks to me to be a follly, there were a number of lodging houses in the street, I wonder if it could have been one of those?

According to R J Charleton's "A History of Newcastle Upon Tyne", it was a "pretty rural lane running down to Pandon". Indeed it was one of the main thoroughfares between the ancient Towns of Newcastle and Pandon in Medieval times.. It had also been known as Temple Gate, All Hallow Gate and Jews Gate.

There was a Presbyterian Meeting House there, having been built in 1744.

Silver Street is thought to have taken it's name from Jews in the area who were involved with the silver trade.

At one time it was a highly respectable area, housing surgeons, lawyers and merchants and also home to the famous Newcastle Historian, Henry Bourne. However, that was later to change and Silver Street turned into a slum area with neither drains nor sewers.
 

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I've had a look at the Directories from around that time and cannot see much to explain the building. It looks to me to be a follly, there were a number of lodging houses in the street, I wonder if it could have been one of those?

According to R J Charleton's "A History of Newcastle Upon Tyne", it was a "pretty rural lane running down to Pandon". Indeed it was one of the main thoroughfares between the ancient Towns of Newcastle and Pandon in Medieval times.. It had also been known as Temple Gate, All Hallow Gate and Jews Gate.

There was a Presbyterian Meeting House there, having been built in 1744.

Silver Street is thought to have taken it's name from Jews in the area who were involved with the silver trade.

At one time it was a highly respectable area, housing surgeons, lawyers and merchants and also home to the famous Newcastle Historian, Henry Bourne. However, that was later to change and Silver Street turned into a slum area with neither drains nor sewers.

It's a large and interesting (in the photographs at least, maybe not so interesting in real life) building to have existed without leaving a record, shame.

F
 

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It's a large and interesting (in the photographs at least, maybe not so interesting in real life) building to have existed without leaving a record, shame.
F
Looking at the photographs I would say that the same building is shown from two angles, looking 'up' the street [west] and one east. This is effectively on the site of the All Hallows Lane apartments. Looking at the westerly pic there are a series of signs at the top of the building, one of which reads Campbell & ... something. It also seems to refer to 'International and National'. I'm guessing that the pic is comparatively recent [post war] because of the car and road sign.

The street was name did come from Jewish silversmiths who lived there. Temple Gate is an interesting name - it suggestes that there was a synagogue there. However, the first 'Temple' [synagogue] in Newcastle was founded by my x times great [forget how many] grandfather on what is now Temple Street. There's apparently still a small cemetery there behind the former lighting centre building but I ve never been able to get in to see it.

Does anyone have any pics of the Temple or the cemetery ?
 

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Looking at the photographs I would say that the same building is shown from two angles, looking 'up' the street [west] and one east. This is effectively on the site of the All Hallows Lane apartments. Looking at the westerly pic there are a series of signs at the top of the building, one of which reads Campbell & ... something. It also seems to refer to 'International and National'. I'm guessing that the pic is comparatively recent [post war] because of the car and road sign.
Yes noticed that as well and reckon that the frontage to the building was actually on PILGRIM STREET. That being the correct alignment this would make the building in question 215,217 and 219 Pilgrim Street which was The Earl of Durham Inn owned by James Deuchar & Co, still there in 1921 per Kelly's Directory. Gone by 1936 as no trace in Wards Directory.
 

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Silver Street

Alan Morgan's book Victorian Panorama gives Jew-Gate, All-Hallow-Gate and Temple-Gate as previous names for the current Silver Street. He also states that Dog Bank was once called Silver Street, when the present Silver Street was known as All-Hallow-Gate. Both streets were apparently occupied by Jewish silver dealers.

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Does anyone have any pics of the Temple or the cemetery ?
There's a small picture of the cemetery in Hidden Newcastle by Christopher Goulding. I don't have a copy to hand, but they've got it in the City Library.
 

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The street was name did come from Jewish silversmiths who lived there. Temple Gate is an interesting name - it suggestes that there was a synagogue there. However, the first 'Temple' [synagogue] in Newcastle was founded by my x times great [forget how many] grandfather on what is now Temple Street. There's apparently still a small cemetery there behind the former lighting centre building but I ve never been able to get in to see it.

Does anyone have any pics of the Temple or the cemetery ?
Little snippet of information that I have on my hard drive :

The Jewish Cemetery was founded in 1835 when the Jewish Community in Newcastle purchased a plot of land, which at that time lay outside of the City Walls in an undeveloped area which was basically "countryside". However with the development and expansion of the Town Centre the Cemetery became jealously viewed by the developers of the time.

Plans were made for the area, including “The Tyne Theatre and Opera House”. Unhappy with the decision by Newcastle's Town Fathers to permit the development the Jewish Community appealed to the then Prime Minister, Lord Palmerston, but to no avail and the plans were authorised.

However, as part of the ultimate agreement to sell off the Cemetery, a section measuring some 55 square yards was to be preserved as a testimonial to the fact that a Jewish Cemetery had been there. That is what remains to this day.


Found this on the Temple Street Synagogue @ http://www.jewishgen.org/JCR-uk/community/newcast_temple/index.htm

Official Name: Temple Street Synagogue
Address: Temple Street, Newcastle
Date Formed: 13 July 1838
Current Status: Closed about 1878
Ritual: Ashkenazi Orthodox
Congregation Numbers: 1845 - congregation had about 33 adults and 33 children

Also this @ http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=253&letter=N

in 1838, the first regular synagogue was erected in Temple street. By 1868 the synagogue had become too small for the increasing community, and another congregation was formed under the presidency of J. de Hart, a place of worship being acquired in Charlotte square. In 1873, through the efforts of the Rev. A. L. Green, an amalgamation was arranged between the two congregations. Six years later the foundation-stone of the United Synagogue was laid by De Hart, and the building, in Leazes Park Road, was consecrated in the following year (1880). At the present time (1904) the synagogue has 220 seat-holders. There are various charities, clubs, and friendly societies, besides a bet ha-midrash

Read more: http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=253&letter=N#ixzz1GnBPyADD




Now I might be talking through my back side here, but as part of the deal to sell off the land the Jewish Community were granted their own cemetery that remains to this day in Hazlerigg.
 

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Now I might be talking through my back side here, but as part of the deal to sell off the land the Jewish Community were granted their own cemetery that remains to this day in Hazlerigg.
Many thanks for that.

There's also Jewish Burial ground in Westgate Cemetery; that s where X times great grandfather is lurking - Trytle Joel. He was aPpole who came out one of the many times that things became a little rough over there - described variously as a jeweler and a bullion dealer.
 

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Looking at the photographs I would say that the same building is shown from two angles, looking 'up' the street [west] and one east. This is effectively on the site of the All Hallows Lane apartments. Looking at the westerly pic there are a series of signs at the top of the building, one of which reads Campbell & ... something. It also seems to refer to 'International and National'. I'm guessing that the pic is comparatively recent [post war] because of the car and road sign.
Is this the building in this photo, behind All Saints Church?


P&T Image Archive, Newcastle City Council

Cheers
GBDT
 

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Found this one taken in 2004.

Many thanks, I've tried to get in a few times but now the lighting centre is out of there it's hard to figure our who even has the access to it.

Is this the building in this photo, behind All Saints Church?
It must be. I suspect looking at the roof, windows etc that the building in the pic is the one to the left [west] of the Church.

The photo seems to have been taken a little before the Swan House construction period, and looking at the cars I d say perhaps early 60s. Interesting that in the pic looking west [up the bank] the longer, narrow structure which seems to be part of the same building is not there, suggesting that s a later pic.
 

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Many thanks for that.

There's also Jewish Burial ground in Westgate Cemetery; that s where X times great grandfather is lurking - Trytle Joel. He was aPpole who came out one of the many times that things became a little rough over there - described variously as a jeweler and a bullion dealer.
Do you mean St Johns Westgate and Elswick Cemetery rather than Westgate Cemetery? - that has a dedicated Jewish Section :

 

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Yes that's the building all right - not on Pilgrim Street as I mistakenly suspected :bash: Anyone got access to an old street map of Newcastle is the building on Manor Chare or Manor Street?

Just seen this interesting discussion!

The building appears to be near the corner of Silver Street with Lower Pilgrim Street . . .





The map is dated 1946, and shows that Manor Chare is slightly further North / North East of the location of that building.
 
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