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Many thanks, I've tried to get in a few times but now the lighting centre is out of there it's hard to figure our who even has the access to it.
I heard they had an agreement with the owners of the Charlton Bonds building that they'd let in anyone that asked to see it and I'm sure this agreement would have been passed on to the next owners. It also sides onto the theatre but not sure whether there is access to it from there.

Of course you could always try base jumping :lol:

F
 

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I heard they had an agreement with the owners of the Charlton Bonds building that they'd let in anyone that asked to see it and I'm sure this agreement would have been passed on to the next owners. It also sides onto the theatre but not sure whether there is access to it from there.

Of course you could always try base jumping :lol:

F
The photo was found in a file of Charlton Bond photos. One of them shows a set of steps going down into the cemetery.

Cheers
GBDT
 

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Many thanks, I've tried to get in a few times but now the lighting centre is out of there it's hard to figure our who even has the access to it.
About thirty or so years ago, I was reliably informed, that access to the cemetery was gained via the ladies toilet of "The Black Bull" on Westgate Road, (I kid you not).
The pub is now called The Bodega, just downstream of the Robert Sinclair building.

Chris
 

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I've tried to get in a few times but now the lighting centre is out of there it's hard to figure our who even has the access to it.

Found a reference to the cemetery on this website . . . http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/

Thornton Street Cemetery (Orthodox), off Westgate Street: Near to the Temple Street Synagogue. First cemetery of the community. In use from about 1831 to 1851. Only about five headstones remain. The www.northeastjewish.org.uk website (no longer operative) had Jewish history of the Northeast England stated that. "On October 9th 1830 seven Jewish residents entered into an agreement to pay 4p each week to form a fund to purchase a cemetery... and 250 square yards of land was purchased in Thornton Street for a burial ground. This may be the cemetery, which still exists to this day behind Waterloo Street. This site can be visited by arrangement." Last Updated on Friday, 27 August 2010 17:01
It doesn't say "who" the arrangements can be made with!
 

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Found a reference to the cemetery on this website . . . http://www.iajgsjewishcemeteryproject.org/

It doesn't say "who" the arrangements can be made with!
About thirty or so years ago, I was reliably informed, that access to the cemetery was gained via the ladies toilet of "The Black Bull" on Westgate Road, (I kid you not).
The pub is now called The Bodega, just downstream of the Robert Sinclair building.
That s a compelling reason to visit the Bodega - and I usually don t need too much of an excuse. I knew there was a reason I liked the Bodega and Tilleys so much. :)

Many thanks for that. Away for a few days but I ll knock on the door again and see if I can get in. Closest I got was when viewing a flat I was interested in in the block which overlooks it. I'd rather forgotten where I was but Mrs Newcastlepubs figured out that we could just about see down into the 'courtyard'.

Thought the family are 'elsewhere' it would be nice to see it. Its always rather impressed me that he managed to get himself out of Poland and 'found' something in the city.
 

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Wow, the apartments now in waterloo house are where we looked down from, when this pic was taken it's a simple brick wall looking south. Thanks for those
 

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According to Lewis Bolsover The Jewish Communities of North-East England (1980) 250 sq yds of land was bought in 1835 for a burial ground in Thornton Street and enclosed with a wall.

The site for the synagogue in Temple Street was acquired in 1838. "It has been suggested that there was a subterranean passage connecting the synagogue with the cemetery, but this was probably no more than an enclosed pathway and a later memoir refers to a narrow lane with an iron railing and gate running by the side of the synagogue and leading to the cemetery."

The cemetery was ordered to be closed in 1851 and burials then took place at the Sunderland cemetery until 1857 when a site was purchased in the City Cemetery in Elswick Road. The cemetery [in 1980] had only five headstones. Three were weatherbeaten, but two were in reasonably good condition and the Hebrew engravings were legible.
 

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Just seen this interesting discussion!

The building appears to be near the corner of Silver Street with Lower Pilgrim Street . . .

The map is dated 1946, and shows that Manor Chare is slightly further North / North East of the location of that building.
Just had sight of Kelly's Directory 1965 and note that CAMPBELL AND ISHERWOOD LTD (Electrical Engineers) were at Marine House, SILVER STREET. So it looks likely that this was the firm in that crenelated building.
 

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Tunnel to Jewish cemetery

Maybe this should go on the Victoria Tunnel thread as well!


According to Lewis Bolsover The Jewish Communities of North-East England (1980) 250 sq yds of land was bought in 1835 for a burial ground in Thornton Street and enclosed with a wall.

The site for the synagogue in Temple Street was acquired in 1838. "It has been suggested that there was a subterranean passage connecting the synagogue with the cemetery, but this was probably no more than an enclosed pathway and a later memoir refers to a narrow lane with an iron railing and gate running by the side of the synagogue and leading to the cemetery."

The cemetery was ordered to be closed in 1851 and burials then took place at the Sunderland cemetery until 1857 when a site was purchased in the City Cemetery in Elswick Road. The cemetery [in 1980] had only five headstones. Three were weatherbeaten, but two were in reasonably good condition and the Hebrew engravings were legible.
 

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Apologies if it's already been discussed, but what is the big building in the right foreground - the one with people sitting on the steps?

Great thread, btw!
Hi Captain Timber

The building last saw use as the SALVATION ARMY MENS PALACE and stood on DOG BANK. This was discussed further down on this thread, so best use the Index to track the postings.

I've just been looking at further history of the building and find that it was built in circa 1908 as one of the ROWTONS HOUSES which were lodging houses opened up by LORD ROWTON. These were hostels for working men and were originally set up in London. The photograph in question shows ROWTONS painted on the roof.

Information from http://www.glias.org.uk/news/233news.html#N
The idea was to provide cheap individual, albeit spartan, sleeping cubicles, adequate shared washing and toilet facilities, a kitchen with a dining room and a communal sitting area. Individuals could stay just one night or longer.
Information on Lord Rowton can be seen @ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montagu_Corry,_1st_Baron_Rowton

The building was taken over by SIMPSONS HOTEL CO LTD by 1921 and then passed over to the Salvation Army by 1936.

A 1965 photograph showing the end of the Men's Palace courtesy of the City Libraries Collection @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/newcastlelibraries/4077618208/sizes/o/in/photostream/


 

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Image of Pilgrim Street, looking down Dog Bank. Obviously built before the Salvation Army Mens Palace. Just goes to show buildings in the past didin't have long lives in comaprison to their moden equivilents, which I believe most people think is the case.



Courtesy of Newcastle Libraries

Description : A view of Dog Bank Newcastle upon Tyne taken in 1879-1880. The photograph shows Dog Bank taken from Pilgrim Street. In the foreground to the left is a public house and to the right a man sitting on bench in front of a building. The first shop on the left-hand side of Dog Bank is I. P. Sherry a Clothes Dealer with other shops beyond. There are also buildings on the right-hand side of Dog Bank. Collection : Local Studies Source of Information : Name of stairs and chare on right-hand side through to quayside is 'Plummer Chare' (it can be seen distinctly on negative). Small beer house at bottom of Pilgrim Street no. 241 kept by a S. McGuiness in 1882. But in Lloyd's Directory for 1885-6 it is kept by J. Patterson. So this gives the clue to the date of the photo. 1882 Directory - No. 3 R. Dixon Grocer. There are 33 door numbers on this left-hand side which means there are 16 doors or entrances. On the right there is probably no more than half this number due to the bottom end being occupied by big buildings.

The site of the Salvation Army Mens Palace is now the site of a row of relatively nice 80's houses, which seem to have relatively the same footprint as the previous building. Even though the Mens Palace looks huge.
 

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Some brilliant shots, especially of the Northern Academy of Arts of which I had no knowledge.

Now, a question, which I have had no luck in answering elsewhere online or in Newcastle. I have spent the past year compiling as much information as possible about Newcastle's historical theatres and cinemas and I have virtually every base covered, except one. There was, until about 1997, a 'gentlemans' cinema in Blandford Square, near the Discovery Museum and the defunct Diving Centre. It was rather discreet and architecturally unremarkable, and my only real memories of it were during its demolition when I used to live in Summerhill Square; like many buildings in that area (Broken Doll, Strings, Diving centre, etc), it was pulled down to make way for the motorway. (Was it even a cinema?)

A number of people remember this cinema / club, but all of those I've asked have little more than vague recollections (or an unwillingness to admit they went). Can anyone remember its name, lifespan, operations etc. Any photographs would, naturally, be wonderful. Although it may have been a seedy little oddity, any true survey of Newcastle's cinemas would be incomplete without including it.

Thanks,
Lee.
 
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