SkyscraperCity banner

1121 - 1140 of 7520 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Jewish Newcastle

Although not Jewish myself. I recently discovered that the house I grew up in was built on the site of a former synagogue in Gloucester Street, Elswick. Does anyone have any information or photographs of this perhaps.

Also St John's Cemetery in Elswick has a huge Jewish section, this would seem to indicate there was once a large Jewish population in that area. Again any information would be welcome.

Ta very much.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
13,034 Posts
The first synagogue in Newcastle was on Thornton street [founded by my X tim es great grandfather]. He is buried in the Jewish section of Elswick cemetery. There was certainly a Jewish community in Newcastle before that; Silver Street on Quayside was one specific area [known as Jew Street]. The community was expelled in the mid 13th century. The modern community dates to the late 18th century.

My reading is that in the early to mid 19th century was that there were not particularly concentrated communities [save for families being close together]. I ve certainly not come across Elswick as being a particularly 'jewish' area. I suspect that the burials are simply as a result of there being a jewish section as there are with other cemeteries in the area.

I can't find anything on a synagogue on Gloucester Street:

http://www.jewishgen.org/JCR-UK/england_geographic.htm

This lists pretty much everything in the area.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,164 Posts
There are a few photos of (old) Gloucester Street here . . .

http://www.flickr.com/search/?ss=2&[email protected]&q=Gloucester+street&m=text

The photos there appear to include . . .

1 - A Christian Mission Hall
2 - A Catholic Apostolic Church
and
3 - A Baptist Church

. . . but nothing that says it is a former synagogue.

We may have discussed this previously on this forum, and the best place to start (if you have not already) is via the posts linked from (and those other posts 'around' where those links take you) the JEWISH RELIGIOUS PLACES IN NEWCASTLE section, on the 'Index Thread'.

You could also try under Gloucester Road, for mentions of 'Gloucester Street'.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
13,034 Posts
There are a few photos of (old) Gloucester Street here . . .

http://www.flickr.com/search/?ss=2&[email protected]&q=Gloucester+street&m=text

The photos there appear to include . . .

1 - A Christian Mission Hall
2 - A Catholic Apostolic Church
and
3 - A Baptist Church

. . . but nothing that says it is a former synagogue.

We may have discussed this previously on this forum, and the best place to start (if you have not already) is via the posts linked from (and those other posts 'around' where those links take you) the JEWISH RELIGIOUS PLACES IN NEWCASTLE section, on the 'Index Thread'.

You could also try under Gloucester Road, for mentions of 'Gloucester Street'.
This is a bit of a guess, but....



shows the Catholic Apostolic Church. If you look at the windows you'll see three hexgram 'Star of David' in the circle above the central door. They are actually quite common in Christian churches, but if someone didn't know that, and didn't know the history of the building it would be easy to assume it was an old synagogue. The fact that it doesn't have a 'steeple' so doesn't look churchy might also point in that direction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,714 Posts
Doing some family research. Is anyone aware of a waxworks in Gateshead in the early 20th Century ?
By waxworks do you mean a factory/workshop producing wax, wax models/products etc or an entertainment facility along the lines of Madam Tussaud?

(Just to (perhaps) clarify matters - I'm not qualified to answer whatever your reply is)
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
13,034 Posts
By waxworks do you mean a factory/workshop producing wax, wax models/products etc or an entertainment facility along the lines of Madam Tussaud?

(Just to (perhaps) clarify matters - I'm not qualified to answer whatever your reply is)
Good point. Family story was of a waxworks - and I assumed models of Queen Victoria, but now you mention it.....a candle factory might be more like it
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,164 Posts
Doing some family research. Is anyone aware of a waxworks in Gateshead in the early 20th Century ?

The best place to research this would be in the 'Trade Directories' of the era in question.

I only have one Trade Directory, a Kelly's from 1959, and while it has been amazingly useful to me over the years, it is not (probably) from the era you are looking for, though that doesn't mean that the company (whatever it might have been called) might not have still been in existence in 1959.

Searching for this has, usefully, enlightened me that my 1959 Kelly's has a page missing. I never knew that until now! In the Trades Section, it goes from page 748 (Warehousekeepers) to page 761 (Wire Workers), so the section on "Wax Manufacturers" (or whatever) is co-incidentally missing!

Annoying, for me, is that - to find that there is a page missing.

Anyway, I then looked up Candle Manufacturers and I found this one, with its office at City Road, but its 'Works' (factory, I assume) at Dunston . . .




Anyway, while this probably isn't it (as this is 1959) it is possible that others on this forum may have other directories, and there are plenty at the Central/City Library.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
13,034 Posts
Many thanks for that. I ve some Kellys here so I ll have a look about. The suggestion that it might have been a wax works rather than a waxworks [which always seemed odd] opens up an interesting line of enquiry.
 

·
Part Time Contributor
Joined
·
43,322 Posts
The best place to research this would be in the 'Trade Directories' of the era in question.

I only have one Trade Directory, a Kelly's from 1959, and while it has been amazingly useful to me over the years, it is not (probably) from the era you are looking for, though that doesn't mean that the company (whatever it might have been called) might not have still been in existence in 1959.

Searching for this has, usefully, enlightened me that my 1959 Kelly's has a page missing. I never knew that until now! In the Trades Section, it goes from page 748 (Warehousekeepers) to page 761 (Wire Workers), so the section on "Wax Manufacturers" (or whatever) is co-incidentally missing!

Annoying, for me, is that - to find that there is a page missing.

Anyway, I then looked up Candle Manufacturers and I found this one, with its office at City Road, but its 'Works' (factory, I assume) at Dunston . .

Anyway, while this probably isn't it (as this is 1959) it is possible that others on this forum may have other directories, and there are plenty at the Central/City Library.
Hi NH

Page 749 has only two Wax Manufacturers shown and they are:

Hillie Poth & Co Ltd in Stratford, London and
Technical Waxes Ltd in Bury

Non on Tyneside.

Are you missing the pages from 749 to 760?, if you are I can scan them from the copy I've got and send them to you?
 

·
Modern Antiquarian
Joined
·
834 Posts
This is a bit of a guess, but....[the picture]
shows the Catholic Apostolic Church. If you look at the windows you'll see three hexgram 'Star of David' in the circle above the central door. They are actually quite common in Christian churches, but if someone didn't know that, and didn't know the history of the building it would be easy to assume it was an old synagogue. The fact that it doesn't have a 'steeple' so doesn't look churchy might also point in that direction.
There's no mention of a synagogue in Gloucester Street in Lewis Olsover's The Jewish Communities of North-East England (1981).

Interestingly the Catholic Apostolic Church was notable for Jewish converts, but I think this has no bearing on the the use of the star or shield of David motif. Actually it wasn't really used much as a Jewish symbol before it became part of the flag of the modern state of Israel. The menorah seven-branch candle stick was the usual 'logo' as we would say today. The six-pointed star is found on many buildings, particularly in iron work (for instance at Tynemouth Station I seem to remember), I think simply because it is a pleasing geometric shape.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
13,034 Posts
There's no mention of a synagogue in Gloucester Street in Lewis Olsover's The Jewish Communities of North-East England (1981).

Interestingly the Catholic Apostolic Church was notable for Jewish converts, but I think this has no bearing on the the use of the star or shield of David motif. Actually it wasn't really used much as a Jewish symbol before it became part of the flag of the modern state of Israel. The menorah seven-branch candle stick was the usual 'logo' as we would say today. The six-pointed star is found on many buildings, particularly in iron work (for instance at Tynemouth Station I seem to remember), I think simply because it is a pleasing geometric shape.
I've not been able to find a reference to a Synagogue in Gloucester Street anywhere. You re right, until fairly recently the menorah was the closest thing to a cross [though for obvious reasons the symbolism is quite different].

Looking at the Apostolic Church [apparently there are still 315 members in England, but no priests because a priest can only be ordained by an 'apostle', now all long dead] - in its worship "Particular emphasis was laid on the relationship between the rites under the Jewish law as laid down in Leviticus and the liturgy of the church". In the church "the seven lamps, reminiscent of the seven-branched candlestick of the Jewish rituals, would hang over the chancel near the sanctuary".

I suspect this might be a set of oral tradition putting 2 and 2 together and getting 4.1. It's increasingly obvious how the story started.

Anyway, I then looked up Candle Manufacturers and I found this one, with its office at City Road, but its 'Works' (factory, I assume) at Dunston . . .
Many thanks NH. Be funny if the City Road premises is the one... I ve lived on Pandon Bank, City Road for the last 10 or so years :)

Will be worth bearing in mind to look up TALLOW rather than wax
I ll have a look about, but I suspect tallow is less likely than wax in this case.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,164 Posts
Hi NH

Page 749 has only two Wax Manufacturers shown and they are:

Hillie Poth & Co Ltd in Stratford, London and
Technical Waxes Ltd in Bury

Non on Tyneside.

Are you missing the pages from 749 to 760?, if you are I can scan them from the copy I've got and send them to you?

Hi Steve,

Meant to type "749 to 750" (not '760') - it is just the one double-sided page that is missing!

Thanks very much for that, if you do get a chance to scan them in, could you then 'PM' them?

That would be much appreciated.

Cheers :cheers:
 

·
Part Time Contributor
Joined
·
43,322 Posts
Although not Jewish myself. I recently discovered that the house I grew up in was built on the site of a former synagogue in Gloucester Street, Elswick. Does anyone have any information or photographs of this perhaps.

Also St John's Cemetery in Elswick has a huge Jewish section, this would seem to indicate there was once a large Jewish population in that area. Again any information would be welcome.

Ta very much.
Just been looking through Kelly's Directory for 1921 and note the following 'religious establishments' in Gloucester Street:

United Methodist Church
Christian Brethren's Meeting House
Catholic Apostolic Church

One thing that does spring to mind is the fact that early Synagogue's in Newcastle were also founded in the front rooms of private houses and this could possibly be the case here. For instance this is an entry for Gloucester Street in 1921 : 65 Kibel Jacob,commercl,trav
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
13,034 Posts
One thing that does spring to mind is the fact that early Synagogue's in Newcastle were also founded in the front rooms of private houses and this could possibly be the case here. For instance this is an entry for Gloucester Street in 1921 : 65 Kibel Jacob,commercl,trav
Yes, so long as 10 people are present [a minyan] you can have communal worship. Though in the strictest sense it's not a synagogue as that has to be consecrated and reserved for prayer. However by the mid 19th century Newcastle was fairly well served with synagogues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,834 Posts
I have often wondered how did the tanks from Vickers leave Newcastle? and I was always puzzled by the relationship between the "city" and the arms industry.
It's like a mad old woman in the attic that know one likes to talk about but as an outsider it was apparent to me of an uneasy relationship between the two.
I would place Lord Armstrong at the top of the Earl Gray monument and rename it such is his importance to the city.
 
1121 - 1140 of 7520 Posts
Top