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Thank you for your replies - very interesting, and good to know that I'm not going mad after all! I may have to have a wander up that way to visit the old "Powder Monkey" bike track as I just assumed it had disappeared!
 

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'Stuffy'
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Jesmond Dene House ARP HQ

Is there anyone out there that served in the ARP in Jesmond, Newcastle? Bunker 13 would like to hear any stories about yur experiences. Has anyone got any photography from the ARP days and from Jesmond Dene House ARP HQ? Would love to hear from you.
 

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ARP Wardens of WW2


ARP (air raid precaution) wardens supervised the Blackout.

What was ARP?

Air Raid Precautions (ARP) were organised by the national government and delivered by the local authorities. The aim was to protect civilians from the danger of air-raids.

In September 1935, four years before WW2 began, British prime minister, Stanley Baldwin, published a circular entitled Air Raid Precautions (ARP) inviting local authorities to make plans to protect their people in event of a war. Such plans included building public air raid shelters.

In April 1937 the government decided to create an Air Raid Wardens' Service and during the next year recruited around 200,000 volunteers. These volunteers were know as Air Raid Precaution Wardens.

What was the job of the ARP Wardens?

Their main purpose of ARP Wardens was to patrol the streets during blackout and to ensure that no light was visible. If a light was spotted, the warden would alert the person/people responsible by shouting something like "Put that light out!" or "Cover that window!".

The ARP Wardens also reported the extent of bomb damage and assess the local need for help from the emergency and rescue services.

They were responsible for the handing out of gas masks and pre-fabricated air-raid shelters (such as Anderson shelters, as well as Morrison shelters), and organised and staffed public air raid shelters. They used their knowledge of their local areas to help find and reunite family members who had been separated in the rush to find shelter from the bombs.

How many Wardens were there?

There were 1.4 million ARP wardens in Britain, most of who were part time volunteers who had full time day jobs.



ALSO, see Paragraph (16), about the Jesmond Dene House Headquarters and branches at many other local places, HERE . . .
http://www.bpears.org.uk/NE-Diary/Bck/BSeq_03.html




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Jesmond Dene House was a nest of corruption. Look up the 1944 Home Office inquiry into the nefarious goings on at Newcastle in the ARP and the Council's Watch Committee.
 

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cogito ergo sum
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I have another old-Jesmond question. Can anyone on here help, please?

I believe there was a small pub or inn along Jesmond Dene Road which has now long gone. I'll guess it was probably operating 1850-1910. But I've forgotten its name and exactly where it was.

It was on a road just off Jes Dene Rd, it faced north, was constructed as a single storey, pitched roof cottage with central doorway, whitewashed with the name on the east-facing gable end. The side road might have been the stub end of Reid Park Road (which leads to the footpath to St Mary's Well the Manor House and becomes The Grove), or it may have been near (the long demolished) Stote's Hall and the entrance into Collingwood Terrace.

I recall a picture of this pub in one of the series of "Bygone" brochures published by City Libraries which I've mislaid and which isn't in the current series. I don't know if that was from an old photograph, drawing or painting.
And I have a hunch that the word "rose" or "bird" appeared in its name.

Anyone know what it was called, what years it traded and where it was, please? Its been irritating me for some time that I've forgotten the detail.
 

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^^
I think this is the place you are looking for.

I used to live nearby, and I remember passing that stone wall at the bottom of Reid Park Road, daily, on my way across the Dene to Manor Park School.


From - Bygone Jesmond, 1987 edition.
 

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6ft of fun.
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Is there any kind of recognition/memorial to Big Hec in the North East?

I have vivid memories of him appearing in pubs in the 80's with his sweet jar, demanding change. He collected masses of money for charity during that period, but died shortly after.




There is next to no mention of him on google etc.

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Is there any kind of recognition/memorial to Big Hec in the North East? I have vivid memories of him appearing in pubs in the 80's with his sweet jar, demanding change. He collected masses of money for charity during that period, but died shortly after.
There is next to no mention of him on google etc.

Yes, I was "mugged" by him more than once!!

Haven't heard about any memorial to him though.
 

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Urban Environmentalist
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Is there any kind of recognition/memorial to Big Hec in the North East?

I have vivid memories of him appearing in pubs in the 80's with his sweet jar, demanding change. He collected masses of money for charity during that period, but died shortly after.



There is next to no mention of him on google etc.
Big Hec


Charity fundraiser Brian Dowson walking the Newcastle streets. January 1986 (Image: Mirrorpix)

He was a familiar larger-than-life figure in 1980s and 1990s Tyneside - and we knew him as Big Hec. It’s 20 years since Hec - real name Brian Dowson - died at the age of 38. The 6ft 8in, 20-stone gentle giant collected more than £1m for good causes.

Big Hec was famous for his size 18 boots and rattling his collection buckets all over Tyneside. Few who ventured into Tyneside’s drinking holes in the 1980s could have avoided being accosted for money by the towering figure.
He was a regular sight in the pubs of Newcastle , often filling his charity bucket before and after matches at St James Park. Hec would travel the length and breadth of the region raising cash for good causes.
He even turned to song in 1990, when he released his debut single, a cover version of Nancy Sinatra’s These Boots Were Made For Walking, in another fundraising drive

In March, 1996, after raising more than a million pounds for charity, Brian died at South Tyneside District Hospital of natural causes. His funeral at the independent Methodist Church, in Hedworth Lane, Boldon Colliery, was attended by hundreds of people. His ex-wife, Suzanne, said at the time: “Brian will be buried in his favourite outfit – his army suit and big boots.
“I will put a single red rose in the coffin and a picture of Brian with his dog. He treated the dog like the child he never had.”

In the months after his death, a memorial plaque to Hec was put up in Frederick Street, in Brian’s native South Shields. He was also immortalised as a Shakespearean hero in a poem by Desmond Graham, professor of poetry at Newcastle University. Dr Graham said: “I think Big Hec was a marvellous character. I used to see him collecting in a Newcastle pub called the Dog and Parrot and I simply tried to bring him to life. “I was always impressed with the way he tried to help out, even though some people wanted to bring him down.”

In 1998, he also became the subject of a play, called Big Hec, written by North East author Barry Stone and performed in South Shields and Blyth.
One reader wrote to the Chronicle, saying: “He was a lovely man with a heart as big as his boots. He was a gentle man who would help anyone. He will be sadly missed.” That was Big Hec - Brian Dowson - who passed away 20 years ago . . . By David Morton Newcastle Chronicle @ncjmedia

There is a press release on the university website which mentions him:

One character Prof Graham is happy to identify is Kent, "the good guy in King Lear". It is a moving portrait of Big Hec, (real name Brian Dowson) the larger-than-life charity collector who became a familiar figure around the streets of Newcastle until he died at the age of 38 in 1996. The towering six feet eight inch giant of a man with size 18 feet is said to have raised more than £1 million.
http://www.ncl.ac.uk/press.office/press.release/item/1006524581

My guess is if you contact that Professor he will share some of his research with you as he must have done some digging when writing the character.

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^^
I think this is the place you are looking for. I used to live nearby, and I remember passing that stone wall at the bottom of Reid Park Road, daily, on my way across the Dene to Manor Park School.


From - Bygone Jesmond, 1987 edition.

IT IS ! !
Thank you! The "Apple Tree Inn", yes, that's exactly what I wanted to know, and exactly the image I remember having seen. Much appreciated!

That WALL is indeed still there. Photo taken 27th May 2010 . .


The wall, from exactly the same angle, is much more overgrown, but its 'shape' can still be seen. The pillars and gates are still there, just to the right of my photo. I thought they were 'in shot' actually!!
 

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The Legend
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Does anyone have any photos or know what the building on Newgate Street currently "sinners bar" was?
I think that was part of the Mayfair, but I'm not too sure. I didn't tend to go down that way before the Gate opened.

I'm sure NH will have a picture for you, I remember one not long ago of it being somewhere on here.

By the way welcome to the forum.
 

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Sinners used to be called Lennon's.

Can't remember what it was called before that.

Sinners is in the same building that Lennon's was, it isn't a new building.

The Mayfair was further up Newgate Street, in the old "Newgate House' building (now demolished) that is where The Gate now is.

The entrance to the Mayfair was a little way along Low Friar St.
 
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