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Can anyone remember what this bar (now Sinners) was called before it was called Lennon's?

I have found out a bit more about this place (63 Newgate Street) . . .


1 - In the 1800s (!) it was called The Victoria Hotel.

2 - It was rebuilt in the 1920s, but was still called The Victoria.

3 - It closed (as the Victoria) in 1960 and became a carpet shop!

4 - It was re-opened as a pub in 1977, when 'John Smiths' opened it as The Canny Lad.

5 - In the late 1980s, it briefly became called Mr Smiths.

6 - In the early 1990s it became Lennon's.

7 - It is now (as we know) Sinners.
 

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It was indeed Lennon's and great for a pre-match cheap pint .. it's now a bloody awful place, even for a student bar !

I remember last year they had signs up offering free drinks to any female who would show her breasts to bar staff !!

A real classy joint :eek:hno:
 

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cogito ergo sum
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Arthur's Hill

This is a long standing mystery . . . . .

Who was the Arthur of Arthur's Hill, and what and when was his involvement in the area?

I'd appreciate any ideas.
 

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This is a long standing mystery . . . . .

Who was the Arthur of Arthur's Hill, and what and when was his involvement in the area?

I'd appreciate any ideas.
According to David Simpson, local journalist and historian:

ARTHUR'S HILL (TYNESIDE)
Named after Arthur, the son of Isaac Cookson who built the houses in this part of Newcastle. Sadly it has nothing to do with King Arthur.

http://www.englandsnortheast.co.uk/PlaceNameMeaningsAtoD.html
 

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^^

Yes CDBOO, you beat me to it!

I can add a little bit of 'background' to the origin of the name, and thought I would take the opportunity to show a few photos (etc) from the Arthurs Hill area of West Newcastle . . .


From the book Bygone Elswick, by A D Walton.


As part of my research, I found a lovely little book that I knew I had, but hadn't read for ages . . .


Compiled (also) by A D Walton, along with "The Stanhope Street Area Action Centre", in 1979.

Some photos (examples) from the 'A Century of Arthurs Hill' book . .




ALSO from the same book, an interesting 'illustration', drawn in September 1891 . .




I was lucky enough to attend Arthurs Hill Junior School (sometimes called 'Westgate Hill' School) for a couple of enjoyable years, when I lived in nearby Crown Street. Sadly, Crown Street was demolished shortly after we left, but its identical continuation street (Kingsley Terrace) is still there today.

I enjoyed my time in Elswick/Arthurs Hill, I can well remember the MASSIVE bonfire I helped build in our back lane one year (we had got loads of stuff to burn from areas of nearby Scotswood that were being demolished) and it was so big, we nearly set fire to the houses. At the time, I thought it was GREAT (aged 9).

Interestingly, shortly after we moved to Elswick, there was a big article in the Evening Chronicle, entitled "The slum schools of Newcastle". It used Arthurs Hill School as its main example, and stated that it would be demolished within two years. Well, its still there in 2010!


.
 

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Looking for Info on Lisle Street

Hello - New poster seeks help :)

Would anyone have or be able to help me find photos of Lisle Street (off Northumberland Street) before it was redeveloped in the 1960's? It's now a little service street between Greggs and WH Smith but my family lived and worked there from the 1840's until the turn of the 20th Century (when they decamped to Byker) and I'd love to know what it looked like.
 

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Anyone know if Westgate Hill Primary School has always been a school?
I think it has. The gates are obviously Victoria with girls and boys on them, and my gran has some stories about living round it too.

So between my gran's time and Victorian times must only be about 50 years. So if it was anything before a school it must've been short lived.

It looks a bit similar to Chillingham Road school so they might've been built at similar times.

Is it still in special measures?
 

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Not sure BUT I know that towards the end of last year it was federated with Moorside Primary School to create Arthurs Hill Federation - the Headteacher for Moorside became the executive headteacher
 

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Anyone know if Westgate Hill Primary School has always been a school?

Judging by this newspaper article from 1899, about its opening when newly built, it appears to have always been a school.

When I used to attend that school, I remember there was also a physically 'totally identical' school along Westmorland Road somewhere. I don't think that one is there now (?)

Hope you can read this! . . .

 

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Hello - New poster seeks help :)

Would anyone have or be able to help me find photos of Lisle Street (off Northumberland Street) before it was redeveloped in the 1960's? It's now a little service street between Greggs and WH Smith but my family lived and worked there from the 1840's until the turn of the 20th Century (when they decamped to Byker) and I'd love to know what it looked like.

Hi Cloudyblu, and welcome to the Skyscraper City Newcastle Forum.

Thats an interesting one!

No info yet, but I will do some research . . . may take a while.

You may well get info/photos, from various others on here, before I can get there!

Regards.
 

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Lisle Street.

Hello - New poster seeks help :)
Would anyone have or be able to help me find photos of Lisle Street (off Northumberland Street) before it was redeveloped in the 1960's? It's now a little service street between Greggs and WH Smith but my family lived and worked there from the 1840's until the turn of the 20th Century (when they decamped to Byker) and I'd love to know what it looked like.

It is proving quite difficult to find anything on Lisle Street from before it became a service street for underneath Princess Square in the early 1960s.

However, I have found a few things . . .

1 - An 1830 map of Newcastle, showing the layout of the 'Lisle Street area', some ten years BEFORE your family moved there. I imagine it would have been much the same as this map shows, in 1840. There is an ENLARGEMENT of the precise Lisle Street area, beneath the main map . .






2 - The entrance to Lisle Street, from Northumberland Street, as it looked in 1897. NOTE, the "ornate building with the sloping roof" is on the North side of Lisle Street, and the building on the South Side of Lisle Street (the old one that is still there today, with 'Greggs' now in it, has NOT YET been built . .




3 - Only six years later (in 'circa' 1903) the "Greggs" building is now there on the South side of Lisle Street (with the 'New York Life' lettering attached to the second floor windows) and the the mentioned 'ornate building with the sloping roof', on the North side of Lisle Street, can be even more clearly seen . .




4 - Moving on to 1974, and the 'ornate building' has gone from the North side of Lisle Street and has been replaced by the giant "Littlewoods Store" building (which is now, partly, a W H Smith) and Lisle St is now effectively the 'service street' that it still is today.




IN CONCLUSION,

Sorry that I have not been able to (yet) find any photos/pictures "along" Lisle Street, from the 1840-1960s era. I will keep looking, but can anyone else help?

I hope what I have found is of some interest.
 

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Can anyone help me with the history of this building?

It's on Waterloo Street, just up from the traffic lights at the junction with Westmoreland Road.



The upper 2 floors have recently been converted to a "City Express" budget hotel and part of the lower floor has always been from my memory the "Happy Chippy".

Until recently, i'm sure there were signs in the 1st floor window suggesting a nightclub called "Manhatten's or something like that, and there is evidence in the left hand side windows of a bar, possibly called "Presidential"?

The front seems to be a selection of stairways, both up and down and the break in the footpath, in front of the chippy entrance kind of suggests there used to be some kind of archway/cart entrance in there at some point.

Anyone know what the building used to be in the dim and distant past?
 

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6ft of fun.
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Lisle Street.

4 - Moving on to 1974, and the 'ornate building' has gone from the North side of Lisle Street and has been replaced by the giant "Littlewoods Store" building (which is now, partly, a W H Smith) and Lisle St is now effectively the 'service street' that it still is today.




IN CONCLUSION,

Sorry that I have not been able to (yet) find any photos/pictures "along" Lisle Street, from the 1840-1960s era. I will keep looking, but can anyone else help?

I hope what I have found is of some interest.
Interestingly, the mystery doorway from the recent general knowledge thread makes another appearance.
 

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NH, do you do all your research in the City Library using all the copies of newspapers and maps etc. on the 6th floor?

It is impressive research?
 

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Can anyone help me with the history of this building?

It's on Waterloo Street, just up from the traffic lights at the junction with Westmoreland Road.

. . . . and part of the lower floor has always been from my memory the "Happy Chippy".
I can only help a little bit. When it was covered in scaffolding about 8 years ago, I took several pictures, but all viewed through the scaffolding of the opposite side of the road!

At that time, the "Happy Chippy" was on the corner opposite, on the north side of Waterloo Street.
Small Picture here from Happy Chippy facebook page

There had been difficulties in aquiring all the old properties there for the developments between Waterloo Street and Blenheim St (now St James Bvd.). The proprietor of the Happy Chippy held out and wouldn't move. Some believed that his legal costs were being underwritten by a certain developer/bar operator (but who knows?). It was quite a news story - the local paper featured his, er, shop, with tables and chairs in use outside at 3am and posters offering "liquid cannabis" among other exotica. Oh, yes, and chips.
Thariq Mohammed, 34, and his brother Sajit, 31, admitted selling magic mushrooms alongside fish suppers from their shop, the Happy Chippy, on Waterloo Street, Newcastle.

But the brothers, who once displayed signs saying "new magic mushrooms - get off your head", were let off because of a legal loophole.

Magistrates had ruled that the mushrooms were a Class-A drug and were being illegally sold in plastic bags.

But the brothers were cleared after the court accepted they did not realise they were doing anything illegal.

Now they hope to start selling mushrooms again in their new shop, directly opposite the Happy Chippy, which has been pulled down under a compulsory purchase order by the city council.
But the building you refer to? I know it was completely re-structured (ie new entrances, g.floor frontages, etc.) but someone else will have to help.

One interresting feature is that the cafe, the SW side of the building, has curved paving stones leading into a cobbled road entrance into the front of the building. Although I can't remember it, it looks like it was a vehicle entrance - perhaps a garage, goods loading bay, parking?
 

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NH, do you do all your research in the City Library using all the copies of newspapers and maps etc. on the 6th floor?

It is impressive research

No, I am very lucky, I can do almost all my research at home, via my lifetimes accumulation of books, leaflets, newspapers (and newspaper cuttings), magazines, etc, etc. I also have a few items that my father preserved from the late 1950s/early 1960s.

The internet helps also, but quite often I can find what I need from my own resources, though I wish I had a professional 'librarian' (or something like that) to help me to catalogue things fully. I have a good system, but it could be better!

For example, on this thread there is a question about a fairly 'obscure' street, called Lisle Street. Now, I have found a fair bit of information, but not everything the questioner asked for, or that I KNOW that I have. But, when it is something about a place or street (in this case) that is not often asked about, it is quite difficult sometimes, to track the info down!

I wouldn't normally travel out to find information, it would be difficult to find the time, but once recently, I did do so! I used the resources of the City Library a few months ago (see the Historic thread) when I was trying to find a newspaper cutting that WilfBurnsFan had referred to, from a 1957 newspaper. His copy of the paper (he said) was in too poor a condition to scan in, and I did not have that paper, so I went to the City Library and found it there.

It was an enjoyable visit, and I will go back again.

Anyway, thanks for your interest!
 

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Lisle Street.




It is proving quite difficult to find anything on Lisle Street from before it became a service street for underneath Princess Square in the early 1960s.

However, I have found a few things . . .

1 - An 1830 map of Newcastle, showing the layout of the 'Lisle Street area', some ten years BEFORE your family moved there. I imagine it would have been much the same as this map shows, in 1840. There is an ENLARGEMENT of the precise Lisle Street area, beneath the main map . .






2 - The entrance to Lisle Street, from Northumberland Street, as it looked in 1897. NOTE, the "ornate building with the sloping roof" is on the North side of Lisle Street, and the building on the South Side of Lisle Street (the old one that is still there today, with 'Greggs' now in it, has NOT YET been built . .




3 - Only six years later (in 'circa' 1903) the "Greggs" building is now there on the South side of Lisle Street (with the 'New York Life' lettering attached to the second floor windows) and the the mentioned 'ornate building with the sloping roof', on the North side of Lisle Street, can be even more clearly seen . .




4 - Moving on to 1974, and the 'ornate building' has gone from the North side of Lisle Street and has been replaced by the giant "Littlewoods Store" building (which is now, partly, a W H Smith) and Lisle St is now effectively the 'service street' that it still is today.




IN CONCLUSION,

Sorry that I have not been able to (yet) find any photos/pictures "along" Lisle Street, from the 1840-1960s era. I will keep looking, but can anyone else help?

I hope what I have found is of some interest.
Ah thanks for looking Newcastle Historian. The ornate building is quite interesting as I'm assuming the rest of the street would have looked similar to North Street and Saville Row. I'd found a written description of Lisle Street from 1828 which described it as a quiet street - so quiet it was forgotten about :lol:

I'm interested in what the 'proposed roads' are on the map.
 
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