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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This little tour of Raleigh will be in two parts. Enjoy. As always, comments and corrections are welcome. :)



The North Carolina State Capitol from 1840 is one of the finest examples of a major civic
building in the Greek Revival style of architecture.








Fayetteville Street with the Wachovia Capitol Center. The tower is 400 ft. (122 m.) tall
and was completed in 1991.








The red Briggs Hardware Building was the city's first tall building.




Century Postal Office.




More of Fayetteville Street.






2 Hannover Square was completed in 1991. It is currently the tallest building in Raleigh with
its 431 ft. (131 m.).






Raleigh Memorial Auditorium with Lichtin Plaza in front.






The Archdale Building.




The Hawkins-Hartness House from approximately 1882.




One Progress Plaza.




The RBC Center is home to the 2006 NHL Champions, Carolina Hurricanes.
The capacity is 18,176 seats for hockey, 19,722 for basketball, 19,500 for center-stage
concerts, and 18,900 for endstage 360 performances.




The Andrews-Duncan House from 1874.




The Banking & Trust Company Building on Martin Street.

 

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Great pics--thanks for sharing! That Fayetteville Street vista really does look nice---with the developments underway or soon-to-start in that area, I'm very excited for the future.

I had a chance to walk around the other day and scout out many of the developments underway. That area is truly transforming, and the convention center and RBC tower are beginning to take form. Exciting to see! I was particularly impressed with the amount of housing going in to the core---always a sign that a place is getting ready to explode.:) A place I'm particularly impressed with (somewhat to my surprise) is that Palladium Plaza near Progress II. That is really turning in to a nice urban corridor down there.

I can now see how some key areas are starting to merge together--City Market, Fayetteville/Wilmington Street, The Warehouse District and Glenwood.
 

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DenverDane, having seen some of your work made me anticipate an excellent thread on Raleigh, and you certainly delivered the goods :eek:kay: Now, I am anxious to see the sequel. A funny little thing: I used to work in the Andrews-Duncan House (not Andrews-London, since you asked for corrections):


Now, tell us about your experience here. Which areas in Raleigh did you visit? Things you liked, or disliked. You may hurt the feelings of some of us, but we'll have to get over it :lol: Honestly, we know we are not there yet, and even though we always talk about the year 2008 as the magic year for our skyline, it will be the year 2010 when we'll be able to cheer, after several other projects are done and some of the ongoing ones have matured a little. In the meantime, we have to enjoy the ride!!! Still, it is nice to hear the opinions of other people, who don't live here?
 

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WOW! What a beautiful city. Great pictures!


I also think that it's a beautiful city. I hope they plan to go up rather than out in the future! Has it been since '91 that they have built a skyscraper? I would imagine with all the growth something else should have sprouted out.

Is RBC still building a tower? I heard rumors they were scaling it down a bit. :eek:hno:
 

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I also think that it's a beautiful city. I hope they plan to go up rather than out in the future! Has it been since '91 that they have built a skyscraper? I would imagine with all the growth something else should have sprouted out.

Is RBC still building a tower? I heard rumors they were scaling it down a bit. :eek:hno:
RBC Plaza is going full speed ahead, without ANY interruption, or reduction. At 32 floors and 538ft, it will be Raleigh's new tallest - see photo below from two weeks ago.


You are probably thinking about Reynolds Tower 1, which went from 31 floors to 27 floors (actually 28, if we count the top mechanical floor). What you may not know is that the developers actually removed the office component, plus parking spaces, in favor to additional condos and hotel rooms. That is a positive change, in my opinion. Soleil Center 1, in Crabtree Valley, is another project you might have heard of, planned as a 43-story/480ft tall tower. That is not stalled, or reduced, just delayed due to some geological challenges - it is proposed for a flood-prone parcel - and the increased cost (from $100 to $170 million). The developers have split several larger units and added 4 more condos. Each time they request a change, a new review process must take place, and this would delay the project for another 3-4 months. MY guess is they are waiting to see how much demand exists before they submit the final plan and get all permits.

Other ongoing and planned projects are also moving ahead, some of them 20 stories and above, so stick around and you'll see a VERY dynamic skyline. Block "B" alone - partly visible to the left of the red crane in the photo above, where the cleared area is - may become home to a new tallest, if rumors are correct, and probably 1-2 additional high-rises. By 2008, Raleigh's skyline will be the 2nd tallest in the state. By 2010 it will also be the second largest, by far, assuming nothing goes wrong. Today's DT Raleigh leaves much to be desired in terms of skyline quality, but it is still a pleasant place to live, work and play. The problem is that the best parts are normally not seen in the photo tours here. Glenwood South, City Market, Oakwood, Boylan Heights, Mordecai... Our focus on CBD is sometimes hurting the image of our downtown more than promoting it.
 

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Well, this trend exists not only in downtown, but outside, too. I honestly do not know how much you follow the developments in Raleigh, particularly in the downtown area, but I can assure you that many lessons have been learned. More work needs to be done, but the direction is good. The trend is more for towers between 15 and 30 floors, but those are useful, too :) What will definitely change is the skyline, adding height and density in areas that are hurting for image. Along the Hillsborough Str corridor, besides the 28-story Reynolds Tower 1, we should probably hear official plans for the 25-story Winston Project and the 20-story tower by TMC/Boulevard Centro, before the end of this year. One more high-rise is envisioned, and Reynolds Tower 2 is still in the future plans of Reynolds & Reynolds. Three more sites are receiving attention, so stay tuned for a lot more projects, in the downtown section of Hillsborough Str, alone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you for the nice comments, all.

DenverDane, having seen some of your work made me anticipate an excellent thread on Raleigh, and you certainly delivered the goods :eek:kay: Now, I am anxious to see the sequel. A funny little thing: I used to work in the Andrews-Duncan House (not Andrews-London, since you asked for corrections):
Thank you, very much! I got the "Andrews-London" house from the VistitRaleigh.com website. :)

Now, tell us about your experience here. Which areas in Raleigh did you visit? Things you liked, or disliked. You may hurt the feelings of some of us, but we'll have to get over it :lol: Honestly, we know we are not there yet, and even though we always talk about the year 2008 as the magic year for our skyline, it will be the year 2010 when we'll be able to cheer, after several other projects are done and some of the ongoing ones have matured a little. In the meantime, we have to enjoy the ride!!! Still, it is nice to hear the opinions of other people, who don't live here?
I pretty much only went to places in downtown Raleigh, i.e. all the places you see (or will see) in the pictures. It seemed like a very nice, green and safe city and easily accessible on foot, which I liked. The Wachovia Capitol Center is my favorite highrise in Raleigh (at least until the new RBC Tower is complete).

I might be wrong, but it looked like public transportation was rather limited and the downtown area could use more stores or cafes to create some more life in the streets (that may also mean more residentials).

It's impressive with the new projects coming up, and it looks like the city's got a bright future.
 

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DenverDane, I visited the Downtown Raleigh Walking Tour page and saw the entry for the Andrews-London house (35). A little further down they also have the Andrews-Duncan house (38), which is the one you captured in your photo. Let me tell you this: you did a wonderful job with the names and building and this little "error" is not enough to ruin it :lol:

Your observation on transportation is right on the money. Our bus system sucks and I have heard very little in terms of fixing it. While I am optimistic, I cannot praise the existing bus system, even if you paid me big money :lol: It works for some people, but not for a number of residents large enough to make our city a public transportation haven. I am hoping for a decent light rail system in the future, more than useful bus lines.

Another point you touched was the limited retail and restaurants/cafes options, but I am sure you are referring to the three major streets of the city's core: Wilmington, Fayetteville and Salisbury. City Market and Glenwood South have a fair share of destinations, but without significant amount of retail and entertainment venues along the aforementioned streets, the two districts cannot function as major attractions indefinitely. The good news is that several solid projects more than guarantee changes in that department. Again, patience is the only thing we can arm ourselves with. Another 2-3 years and the picture will look MUCH different on the street-level. As is, DT Raleigh leaves a lot to be desired and I think that your evaluation is very balanced.

One statement may "draw fire" from skeptics is the walkability - easy access by foot - comment. Downtowns are normally walkable, but the majority of the city suffers from the suburban patterns of development. It is not as horrible in every area of Raleigh as one might htink, but nevertheless our city has fallen victim to bad and irresponsible planning. I think you are too generous with Raleigh :lol: If you are speaking strictly for the downtown area, then I would totally agree with you; it is pretty walkable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
DenverDane, I visited the Downtown Raleigh Walking Tour page and saw the entry for the Andrews-London house (35). A little further down they also have the Andrews-Duncan house (38), which is the one you captured in your photo. Let me tell you this: you did a wonderful job with the names and building and this little "error" is not enough to ruin it :lol:
Ah, damn... :doh: Too many Andrews houses... There is yet another one in the second part, namely the Heck-Andrews house. :) Thanks again.

One statement may "draw fire" from skeptics is the walkability - easy access by foot - comment. Downtowns are normally walkable, but the majority of the city suffers from the suburban patterns of development. It is not as horrible in every area of Raleigh as one might htink, but nevertheless our city has fallen victim to bad and irresponsible planning. I think you are too generous with Raleigh :lol: If you are speaking strictly for the downtown area, then I would totally agree with you; it is pretty walkable.:
Okay, but I have seen worse.. ;)
 

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By the way, DenverDane, I loved your Madrid photos :) Lots of good memories. I am a big supporter of getting two towers like Kio Torres 1 & 2 for the city-owned Sites 2 and 3, at the Southmost end of Fayetteville Street :yes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
@Burt, PiperPig, Faltan.Lunas: Thanks, guys.
@Raleigh-NC: Glad you liked the Madrid shots too. Yes, that would have looked cool!

Time for the second and final part....

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First Baptist Church.




The beautiful Heck-Andrews House from 1870.






Executive Mansion.




North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.








First Presbyterian Church




Raleigh Water Tower.




City Market.






Raleigh is the "City of Oaks," so in Moore Square stands a giant copper acorn as a symbol
of the city.






Tabernacle Baptist Church.




State Legislative Building.




The Carter-Finley Stadium is home to the North Carolina State University Wolfpack football
team. The capacity is currently 57,583 spectators.








The Haywood House.




The Rogers-Bagley-Daniels-Pegues House.

 

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Excellent work :applause:

From the shadows I can tell that you visited downtown during the morning hours, most likely during the weekend - the roads are too empty for a weekday. Love the crarity of your images :eek:kay:
 
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