SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 20 of 111 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In a recent thread we witnessed people argue nonstop about silly little downtowns. Now let's get to the meat of a city, the part that truly matters, the neighborhoods. Which major cities in the midwest have the best neighborhoods in order.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
My list would go something like this

1 - Saint Louis
2 - Chicago
3 - Cincinnati
4 - Detroit
5 - Cleveland
6 - Milwaukee
7 - Columbus
8 - Minneapolis
9 - Indianapolis
10 - Kansas City
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,426 Posts
What do you mean by 'best?' I never get why people post superlatives like 'best' without clarifying some kind of criteria. Some people may like quiet neighborhoods and considers those the 'best,' while others like dense, vibrant neighborhoods mixed with retail and such and consider those the 'best.'
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Soulbrotha said:
Makes more sense to list the neighborhood names.
But it's not about individual neighborhoods. It's about which cities as a whole have the best neighborhoods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Lmichigan said:
What do you mean by 'best?' I never get why people post superlatives like 'best' without clarifying some kind of criteria. Some people may like quiet neighborhoods and considers those the 'best,' while others like dense, vibrant neighborhoods mixed with retail and such and consider those the 'best.'
It's up to you to base it upon your criteria to come up with your own individual list of which cities that you believe have the best neighborhoods. This isn't a communist board. I'll allow free thought.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,426 Posts
No, I was just hopping you'd offer some direction, not restrict thought. If not, these things turn into flame wars (as you yourself noted about in the one about midwest downtowns).

I like Soul's idea, too. Instead of which city has the 'best' neighborhoods, why not just list what you think the 'best' neighborhoods are for each respective city, or the ones that you know?
 

·
born again cyclist
Joined
·
3,671 Posts
if it's just the sum total of all neighborhoods in a city, then no midwest city can touch chicago, it's more than 3 times bigger than the next closest city, and offers everything from true skyscraper residential hoods (streeterville), to dense low-rise urban (pilsen) to bungalow belt (jeff park) to street car suburbia (beverly) to 50's curvy road/ranch house suburbia (sauganash), and all kinds of various mixtures in between. lot's of midwest cities offer all kinds of great neighborhoods, but if we're to just judge on a cumulative basis, i don't see how chicago can't win.
 

·
The Jive is Alive.
Joined
·
1,537 Posts
I think Chicago has great neighborhoods, but they aren't as beautiful in general as the urban neighborhoods of other cities. The flatness and lack of trees is a detriment. Chicago is very predictable. The Gold Coast, Lincoln Park and River North of course are exceptions, but so many of Chicago's 'hoods look alike. Most of the time I can't tell where one ends and another begins. Saint Louis and Cincinnati have very distinct 'hoods. Almost no two look alike. They all have their own unique vibe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,929 Posts
I'd bet that there are very few people in here that have truly explored all of the major midwestern cities. Downtowns are one thing, but to have an idea about what the neighborhoods are like, you have to spend some time in each of these cities.
 

·
born again cyclist
Joined
·
3,671 Posts
JivecitySTL said:
I think Chicago has great neighborhoods, but they aren't as beautiful in general as the urban neighborhoods of other cities. The flatness and lack of trees is a detriment. Chicago is very predictable. The Gold Coast, Lincoln Park and River North of course are exceptions, but so many of Chicago's 'hoods look alike. Most of the time I can't tell where one ends and another begins. Saint Louis and Cincinnati have very distinct 'hoods. Almost no two look alike. They all have their own unique vibe.
you and your silly vibes again LOL! ;)

i totally, utterly, and respectfully disgaree....... but that wouldn't be the 1st time. you and i rarely see eye to eye, so it ain't worth getting into for the umpteenth time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
JivecitySTL said:
I think Chicago has great neighborhoods, but they aren't as beautiful in general as the urban neighborhoods of other cities. The flatness and lack of trees is a detriment. Chicago is very predictable. The Gold Coast, Lincoln Park and River North of course are exceptions, but so many of Chicago's 'hoods look alike. Most of the time I can't tell where one ends and another begins. Saint Louis and Cincinnati have very distinct 'hoods. Almost no two look alike. They all have their own unique vibe.
Chicago has more neighborhoods so sometimes there is a gradual change from one neighborhood to the other. So for instance, northern Lincoln Park looks just like Lakeview when you cross Diversey. So what? I don't see how not having a clear line in the sand between 'hoods invalidates the fact that Chicago has very diverse neighborhoods which can look nothing alike.

And where in St. Louis can you find an area like Korea Town? Like Pilsen? Like Chinatown? Chicago has the ethnic diversity in the critical mass necessary to create ethnic neighborhoods like this. I am certainly not saying St. Louis doesn't have any ethnic neighborhoods (it absolutely does), but it does not have enough of certain ethnic groups to create neighborhoods like Chicago has.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,929 Posts
Ah, now I get it.

This thread was started by the same guy who responded in the thread asking about dense urban neighborhoods in Minneapolis. After I posted some picks, this guy from St. Louis says, "so the answer is no, but they do have some apartment buildings scattered about?" Smart ass. No, it can't be possible that Minneapolis has urban neighborhoods AND a great looking downtown. That's just too much for you to handle.

Since STL4EVER didn't like the way the downtown thread went, he starts up another one asking about which city has the best neighborhoods, then picks his own city as the best? If your city can't win, selectively pick different criteria, start a new thread, then declare your city the winner!!! I see how it works around here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
The anti-cheesehead said:
I'd bet that there are very few people in here that have truly explored all of the major midwestern cities. Downtowns are one thing, but to have an idea about what the neighborhoods are like, you have to spend some time in each of these cities.
Yeah, I would imagine that most of the people on this board aren't truly qualified to make an accurate list, simply because they haven't spent several months in each city absorbing the culture of each neighborhood.

My family and I have to been to every major city in the midwest, but we rarely spend any time hanging out in the neighborhoods. When we visit a city, we experience all of the attractions and points of interest, we don't waste time people watching and admiring houses in a neighborhood.

I was qualified and capable of joining in the downtown rankings, but I am unable to contribute to this thread.
 

·
Live from red brick mama
Joined
·
368 Posts
HumbleHoosier said:
Yeah, I would imagine that most of the people on this board aren't truly qualified to make an accurate list, simply because they haven't spent several months in each city absorbing the culture of each neighborhood.

My family and I have to been to every major city in the midwest, but we rarely spend any time hanging out in the neighborhoods. When we visit a city, we experience all of the attractions and points of interest, we don't waste time people watching and admiring houses in a neighborhood.

I was qualified and capable of joining in the downtown rankings, but I am unable to contribute to this thread.

That sucks-- you obviously miss out on the true essence of the city. I can't think of anything more lame than hitting the usual tourist traps. I like to dig a little deeper to get a true feel for a city I'm visiting.

And just for the record, I disagree with Jive. Chicago's neighborhoods are fantastic. I think Jive was just saying that they aren't as architecturally distinct from one another as Cincy's or St. Louis's are. I think that's mostly because Chicago boomed so quickly at the turn of the century with no natural barriers to its growth. Chicago has some of the finest urban neighborhoods in the country, although I do many areas feel pancake-flat and could use a little more green to complement the architecture. Cincy of course has hills galore, and St. Louis at least has a little topography to keep it interesting. Of course, Chicago has the lake which is a major compensator to its flat-as-a-board topography.

In essence, I think what makes Chicago's neighborhoods so great is the vibrancy and diversity that they offer, not necessarily the charm. St. Louis and Cincy pack in the charm and maintain an old-world feel, and are urban yet relaxed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
STLgasm said:
That sucks-- you obviously miss out on the true essence of the city. I can't think of anything more lame than hitting the usual tourist traps. I like to dig a little deeper to get a true feel for a city I'm visiting.
Well, that's your opinion. This is the beautiful thing about human beings. We don't all like and care about the same things. I personally think it is unbelievably boring to hang out in neighborhoods. It's just where people live. I just couldn't get too excited monitoring how different people retrieve their mail from their mailbox.
 

·
The Jive is Alive.
Joined
·
1,537 Posts
You guys-- don't jump on me for my response. I just meant that I don't think Chicago's neighborhoods are as aesthetically appealing on the whole as some other Midwest cities. Of course it has more ethnic and cultural diversity, of course it is more crowded and dense and all the like, but as far as the bulk architecture and layout of the city is concerned, I think there are other cities with more beautiful neighborhoods.
 

·
Live from red brick mama
Joined
·
368 Posts
^It's just that downtowns all feel the same after a while. The big attractions, popular chains, sports arenas, etc. What makes cities really unique from each other are the neighborhoods. No, I'm not talking about the houses themselves, but the commercial districts that have independent businesses, restaurants and bars such as Wicker Park in Chicago, the Central West End in St. Louis, Mt. Adams in Cincinnati, etc.
I hate areas that are overrun with tourists.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
469 Posts
HumbleHoosier said:
Well, that's your opinion. This is the beautiful thing about human beings. We don't all like and care about the same things. I personally think it is unbelievably boring to hang out in neighborhoods. It's just where people live. I just couldn't get too excited monitoring how different people retrieve their mail from their mailbox.
He isn't implying that you should sit Indian style on a sidewalk in some neighborhood and watch people walk their dogs. He's saying if you come to Chicago, don't spend all of your time at Gino's East or ESPNZone in RiverNorth. Head out to Wicker Park, grab a coffee, and walk around the streets of the neighborhood. Get lost...walk in a random bookstore or music store, have a beer in some random bar, go eat lunch at some sidewalk cafe you've never heard of.
 

·
born again cyclist
Joined
·
3,671 Posts
JivecitySTL said:
You guys-- don't jump on me for my response. I just meant that I don't think Chicago's neighborhoods are as aesthetically appealing on the whole as some other Midwest cities. Of course it has more ethnic and cultural diversity, of course it is more crowded and dense and all the like, but as far as the bulk architecture and layout of the city is concerned, I think there are other cities with more beautiful neighborhoods.
i ain't jumping on you dude, just strongly disagreeing with you. you're entitled to express your opinion of st louis' neighborhood aesthetic superiority, and i'm entitled to express my opinion that chicago takes a back seat to no midwest city in that department. it's no big deal, you and i usually have differing opinions.

if i disagree with you, it doesn't mean that i'm jumping on ya.
 
1 - 20 of 111 Posts
Top