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Map: 24

In the last decades of the 18th century, further modifications were brought, including the rebuilding of the main altar in 1760. The altar is coated with different kinds of marble (ancient green marble, alabaster, oriental black and white marble), and the apse houses four paintings from the 18th and 19th centuries, showing important episodes of the Church of Ravenna:

Interior of the Cathedral of Ravenna by Wasso H., on Flickr

The dome was also completely rebuilt in 1781. It is 47 meter high, topped by a lantern, and rests on a tambour illuminated by eight big windows:

The dome of the Cathedral of Ravenna, seen from below by Wasso H., on Flickr
 

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The arms of the transept house two magnificent 17th century chapels. On the left side is the chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, whose altarpiece depicts "Moses and the Picking of Manna" and is flanked by two columns of pavonazzeto marble:

The chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, inside the Cathedral of Ravenna by Wasso H., on Flickr

The chapel is richly adorned with frescoes: "Melchisedek Blessing Abraham and his Victorious People" in the lunette above the altar, "The Redeemer and the Archangels in Glory in the dome", "The Prophets" in the four pendentives of the dome, and "The Virtues" and "Two Angels with Eucharistic Symbols" in the underarches:

The chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, inside the Cathedral of Ravenna by Wasso H., on Flickr
 

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On the right side is the richly stuccoed chapel of the Madonna del Sudore (Our Lady of the Sweat), originally erected in 1630 as a vow of the city in the hope of being spared a plague that had spread all over Italy. The 18th century altar depicts “The Glory of Angels”, carved in Carrara marble. A tabernacle houses a little 14th century tempera wooden tablet by Giotto’s school in Rimini, depicting “The Virgin Carrying the Baby in her Arms”. It is known as Our Lady of the Sweat for a miracle rumored to have occurred in 1512, when the icon sweated blood on the occasion of the tragic Battle of Ravenna:

The Madonna del Sudore chapel, inside the Cathedral of Ravenna by Wasso H., on Flickr

The fresco in the dome represents “The Virgin Amidst the Celestial Chorus”, while the ones in the pendentives are of “The Four Evangelists”:

The Madonna del Sudore chapel, inside the Cathedral of Ravenna by Wasso H., on Flickr

The lateral niches of the chapel house two monumental sarcophagi standing on lion paws.
 

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In the immediate vicinity of the Cathedral is the circular church of Santa Giustina, built in 1745-47 for the needs of the Confraternity of the Blessed Sacrament and consecrated in 1799. It was originally unadorned; work on the embellishment of the façade began only in 1856 with the laying of the stone plinth, the portal and the lunette:

The church of Santa Giustina by Wasso H., on Flickr

The interior is now elegantly decorated with niches, pilasters, green, pink and white moldings, and Murano glass chandeliers, but sadly I don’t have photos of it as the church was closed. After WW2, it housed the religious services previously carried out in the Duomo that was undergoing restoration, and underwent a major restoration between 2008 and 2009.

Map: 28

From there, I head north to search for the last monuments mentioned on my ticket, passing next to the Rasponi Garden (or Garden of Forgotten Herbs). The Cathedral is visible from there in all its majesty, with its windows bathed in the golden light of the late afternoon, as is the garden's external wall:

The Cathedral of Ravenna seen from next to the Rasponi Garden by Wasso H., on Flickr
 

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Excellent updates! :eek:kay:
Thank you :hug: I need more likes to keep me motivated please :lol:

How long did it take you to go from 1 to 55?
Depending on what I did between them, either 30 seconds, or 4 hours :lol: You should have noticed the two spots are very close on the map, so I first passed through 55 right after 1, while walking towards the entrance of San Giovanni Battista. I passed there again on my way back to the train station to leave (I had arrived in Ravenna around 2pm, and left around 6pm), and that was when I took the last picture.

I will watch now the second final of the ESC that begins in 10 minutes, and may post new updates tonight after it's over (in about 2:30 hours)
 

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Depending on what I did between them, either 30 seconds, or 4 hours :lol: You should have noticed the two spots are very close on the map, so I first passed through 55 right after 1, while walking towards the entrance of San Giovanni Battista. I passed there again on my way back to the train station to leave (I had arrived in Ravenna around 2pm, and left around 6pm), and that was when I took the last picture.
:lol: I meant how long did it take you to complete the whole itinerary. It was the last picture you posted that made me curious. We are still halfway, but the sun has already starting to set. :)
 

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It was the last picture you posted that made me curious. We are still halfway, but the sun has already starting to set. :)
It was starting to go lower over the horizon, but not to set yet. That happened around #51 as you will see later, and sadly the pictures I took inside the church at #52 came out very grainy because of that :(
 

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Map: 29

A little later, I arrive to Ravenna’s most central and best known square, Piazza del Popolo (Square of the People), which was built by the Venetians as the core of the renewal process they carried out in the city:

Piazza del Popolo panorama by Wasso H., on Flickr

Its dimensions were defined in the years 1470 – 1480 after widening a small area along the bank of river Padenna, the main channel that used to flow within the city’s medieval walls. Following the example of Piazza San Marco in Venice, two columns were erected on the square in 1483. The lion of San Marco was placed on top of one column, while on the other stood a statue of Saint Apollinaris, patron saint of Ravenna. When Pope Julius II defeated the Venetians in 1509 and conquered the city, the lion of San Marco was replaced by the statue of Saint Vitalis. The square owes its present name to the constitutional referendum of 1946, when more than 88% of Ravenna voters (the highest percentage in Italy) chose republic over monarchy.
 

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I present below some of the main buildings lining the square:

Piazza del Popolo panorama by Wasso H., on Flickr

The Town Hall / Palazzo Communale (the crenelated building with the two columns standing in front of it) consists of two adjacent buildings joined by a vault called Cavalcavia that opens onto Via Cairoli. One is the ancient Palazzetto Veneziano (Venetian Palace), on the southwestern side of the square, which was erected by the Venetians as the seat of their governors after conquering the city, and the other is Palazzo Merlato or Palazzo del Comune, which occupies the square’s western side, and was constructed between the late 17th and the 18th century on the spot where the river Padenna used to flow in the Middle Ages. Arcades run along the perimeter of these two palaces. In particular, Palazzetto Veneziano is supported by eight granite columns topped by capitals dating back to Theodoric’s era (late 5th century).

The Palazzo Rasponi del Sale, then Gargantini (the tall beige building on the northeast corner) is a baroque palace built around 1770, an exception in the context of the generalized stagnation of Ravenna in the second half of the 18th century, when many noble families were in economic difficulty.

On the other side is the vast Palazzo della Prefettura (Prefecture Palace, the salmon colored building) occupies about two thirds of the south side of Piazza del Popolo, and was built on the site of the Apostolic Legate Palace, which served as the seat of a permanent representative of the Holy See in Ravenna starting in the 13th century. The building was damaged and rendered unusable during the sack of Ravenna in 1512 by the French, restored several times, then enlarged in 1558 at the expense of the adjacent Palazzetto Veneziano, but was eventually demolished because of the serious damage suffered during the 1688 earthquake, and rebuilt between 1694 and 1696. Serving as the seat of the Prefecture since 1863, it has a simple facade with three orders of windows, embellished by a marble baroque portal with broken tympanum and flanked by columns. The ground floor is made of exposed brick and bounded by a molding in Istrian stone, while a blind attic stands above the last floor.
 

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On the east side of the square stands Palazzo del Monte and its clock tower. The clock originally dates back to the late 15th century, when it was incorporated in the façade of the Venetian church of San Ruffillo (later San Sebastiano). The building was then flanked by a second church dedicated to San Marco; together they came to form a single complex, surmounted by a bell tower erected above the clock. Around 1783, architect Camillo Morigia rearranged the façade and gave it a neoclassical style, repositioning the clock on the side of the tower overlooking the square, and in 1789, a new clock mechanism and quadrant were commissioned:

20160127_153120 by Wasso H., on Flickr

Map: 31

The ancient religious complex was then deconsecrated during the Napoleonic suppressions, and used over time as the Custom House, the city’s first cinema, and other functions. The building was demolished and entirely rebuilt in 1925, preserving only the façade remodeled by Morigia, and the clock tower took on its current appearance. It houses today the local headquarters of some banks:

Palazzo del Monte by Wasso H., on Flickr
 

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To the left of Palazzo del Monte is the baroque Church of Santa Maria del Suffragio, commissioned by the Confraternity of the Blessed Virgin of the Suffragi, and built between 1701 and 1728. It was plagued by numerous static problems, including the collapse of the dome during construction, which led to important structural restorations at the end of the 18th century by Camillo Morigia. The church’s octagonal structure with alternating long and short sides is quite unusual for the city of Ravenna:

Santa Maria del Suffragio church by Wasso H., on Flickr

Map: 32

It has an Istrian stone façade consisting of two parts. In the lower part, pilasters with composite capitals support a curvilinear tympanum above the portal, while the upper part bears a triangular tympanum, two volutes flanked by the statues of Justice and Charity, and a bas-relief in the center depicting the liberation of souls from Purgatory:

Santa Maria del Suffragio church by Wasso H., on Flickr

The interior has rich baroque decorations and eight chapels, one on each side of the octagon, containing many statues of saints, but like many other churches it was closed that day.
 

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To the north of the church, on Via Serafino Ferruzzi, stands Palazzo Pompili. This refined building dates back to the late 16th or early 17th century, and bears a characteristic Istrian stone base and a Renaissance portal. Above the portal is the partially preserved Pompili family's coat of arms. The obelisks and the volutes of the portal suggest a possible execution by the Ferrara school:

Palazzo Pompili by Wasso H., on Flickr

The Pompili family died out in the late 18th century, and the palace passed to several other owners, one of whom was Serafino Ferruzzi, a prestigious local industrialist whom the street was named after.
 

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When I was touring central Italy a couple of years ago, I decided to take a day and visit Ravenna. My motivation lied on getting to know a city world famous reknown by its mosaics.

I got several photos to share, I only share one not to hijack the owner's thread, but I got to say that I very much enjoyed this daytrip. I found the city very tranquil and full of beautiful places. A plus? It was almost without tourists so we could roam the place at a leisurely step.

 
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I got several photos to share, I only share one not to hijack the owner's thread
Thanks for sharing this one! I did take a picture of this same mosaic (coming later), but from farther away as I only had my cell phone and not a professional camera with an effective zoom mode. The quality of my picture is also noticeably worse, but the vivid colors of the mosaic can still be appreciated.

I found the city very tranquil and full of beautiful places.
It is! Maybe a bit too tranquil to my taste, but thinking about it again it allowed me to explore the city and take pictures without any disturbance!

A plus? It was almost without tourists so we could roam the place at a leisurely step.
You're right, I had been to Florence the weekend before I visited Ravenna, and felt overwhelmed by the overly touristic vibe and the sheer number of people walking around and snapping pictures, although it was in the dead of winter! There was almost no picture I took there that wasn't "photobombed" by tourists in some part of it :nuts:
 
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