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Beth at http://newcastleupontynedailyphoto.com/ has given me permission to post this picture of an old stamp machine in Walker "on the building next to the post office near the metro station". I am amazed that it has survived. They used to be a common sight outside of our Post Offices and in some of the bigger ones, inside. Does anybody know of any others that have survived?



I am devastated that I can't access this photograph. I wonder if it is still there.
 

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I seem to remember that as Gateshead "got" the Team Valley, Newcastle "got" Longbenton National Insurance.

This was the "Ministry of National Insurance", as it was in the 1970s after (as can be seen) three pockets of "1960s re-development" had taken place, but the bulk of the site still consited of the old single storey "ward-style" buildings . . .




Here is the same site as it largely is now. The difference between this next photo and "right now" (2011) is that even the last remnants of the old single-storey buildings have now gone.

The site is now named (as it has been for many years) Benton Park View, and is the largest HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) office location in the country (by a LONG way). HMRC being the new Government Department that took over the work of the former HM Customs and Excise (HMCE) and former Inland Revenue (IR) on 16th April 2005 . . .



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This was the "Ministry of National Insurance", as it was in the 1970s after (as can be seen) three pockets of "1960s re-development" had taken place, but the bulk of the site still consited of the old single storey "ward-style" buildings . . .

Here is the same site as it largely is now. The difference between this next photo and "right now" (2011) is that even the last remnants of the old single-storey buildings have now gone.

The site is now named (as it has been for many years) Benton Park View, and is the largest HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) office location in the country (by a LONG way). HMRC being the new Government Department that took over the work of the former HM Customs and Excise (HMCE) and former Inland Revenue (IR) on 16th April 2005 . . .

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Just to add a little to the Ministries history.

Built originally as a Hospital for servicemen injured in the 2nd World War and erected with the assistance of both German and Italian Prisoners of War. It was however unfinished at the end of the War and never used for casualties. However its structure was very much on the basis of wards.

The complex was at one stage the largest concentration of administrators in Europe and in its hey day was quite self contained with its own on site post office, bar, canteens, hairdressers and even a bank.

I relocated there just as the present 'new' buildings were being erected under PFI and for a few months was housed in the old part of the site. I was in a Spur that was linked to what was claimed to be the longest office corridor in the Country. The old buildings certainly lived up to their description of being 'Jerry Built'. Indeed I can well remember their demolition which took very little effort!

The new buildings were far superior and I quite liked working in them, plenty of space and being what I call airey and open plan. However just before I took early retirement they were cutting down everyone's space and cramming more and more workers in.

Non of the old war time buildings exist now, the only remnant being the memorial stone which was created when King George VI opened the complex - see the arrow on the more up to date aerial shot from Google below:

 

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Beth at http://newcastleupontynedailyphoto.com/ has given me permission to post this picture of an old stamp machine in Walker "on the building next to the post office near the metro station". I am amazed that it has survived. They used to be a common sight outside of our Post Offices and in some of the bigger ones, inside. Does anybody know of any others that have survived?
This is the stamp dispenser still on the external wall of the old Post Office in Pink Lane:



This is the Grade II Listed K4 Telephone Kiosk which incorporates both a public telephone and a stamp dispenser and letter box which stands outside of Whitley Bay Station.

Listing courtesy of http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-303435-k4-telephone-kiosk-whitley-bay

Description: K4 Telephone Kiosk

Grade: II
Date Listed: 2 October 1986
English Heritage Building ID: 303435

OS Grid Reference: NZ3573671879
OS Grid Coordinates: 435736, 571879
Latitude/Longitude: 55.0401, -1.4423

Location: Station Square, North Tyneside NE26 2QT

Locality: Whitley Bay
Local Authority: North Tyneside
County: Tyne And Wear
Country: England
Postcode: NE26 2QT

Telephone kiosk. 1930 or later. Type K4: cast iron, painted red overall. 3 top panels with perforated crowns for ventilation. Stamp selling machines and posting box to rear. 18-pane windows to three sides, all in fluted surrounds with panels beneath.
Listing NGR: NZ3573671879

These photographs taken in 2003:





 

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Just to add a little to the Ministries history.

Built originally as a Hospital for servicemen injured in the 2nd World War and erected with the assistance of both German and Italian Prisoners of War. It was however unfinished at the end of the War and never used for casualties. However its structure was very much on the basis of wards.

The complex was at one stage the largest concentration of administrators in Europe and in its hey day was quite self contained with its own on site post office, bar, canteens, hairdressers and even a bank.
[/IMG]
There is a very interesting series of short films of the history of the DHSS at Longbenton. have a look at the first one
http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediaselector/check/nationonfilm/00152?size=4x3&bgc=C0C0C0&nbram=1&bbram=1

Others can be found at http://www.bbc.co.uk/nationonfilm/location/north-east-cumbria/tyneside.shtml

Cheers
GBDT
 

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Just as an 'aside' . .

Looking back at this series of historical NGP documents now, one thing I have noticed that is 'revealed' by them (not actually NDA or NGP related, at all!) but if you look at the documents shown in Part 5 (August 1998) and those in Part 6 (November 1998) it must have been during that 3 month period in 1998, that the City Council changed its LOGO from the traditional one . . .



to the modern style one (as it was described at the time) that we still have today . . .




Just a little bit of 'trivia'!

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Another bit of trivia re the modern logo.

The Graphics department were asked to come up with a number of options for a new, up to date logo for Newcastle. They duly came up with a selection of possible logos but found themselves one short. So they quickly came up with a logo using a quirky typeface (it was a friday afternoon afterall :) ) to make up the numbers. Imagine their surprise when the quirky one was chosen!!

Cheers
GBDT
 

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Another bit of trivia re the modern logo.

The Graphics department were asked to come up with a number of options for a new, up to date logo for Newcastle. They duly came up with a selection of possible logos but found themselves one short. So they quickly came up with a logo using a quirky typeface (it was a friday afternoon afterall :) ) to make up the numbers. Imagine their surprise when the quirky one was chosen!!

Cheers
GBDT
Newcastle City Council Corporate Identity (ID) Protocol @ http://www.newcastle.gov.uk/wwwfileroot/cxo/comms/NCCCorporateIdentityProtocolFINAL.pdf
 

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I seem to remember that Newcastle had the "rights" of a big swath of Gateshead around Saltmeadow and it was only in the 19th century that Gateshead council got it back and was able to develop it..
I think Newcastle Corporation had the lease of the Saltmeadows for several centuries, and Gateshead only regained this even later than you suggested, Grace - mid c20 if memory serves, though I could well be mistaken.

By coincidence, the Saltmeadows was one of the areas considered when the Commissioner for Special Areas was looking for a site in the NE for the industrial estate that was eventually created at Team Valley.
 

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I think Newcastle Corporation had the lease of the Saltmeadows for several centuries, and Gateshead only regained this even later than you suggested, Grace - mid c20 if memory serves, though I could well be mistaken.

By coincidence, the Saltmeadows was one of the areas considered when the Commissioner for Special Areas was looking for a site in the NE for the industrial estate that was eventually created at Team Valley.
Courtesy of Gateshead Local Studies @ http://www.localhistorygateshead.com/gatesheads-history/gateshead-places/saltmeadows

From the mid 15th century the leaders of the Newcastle Corporation owned the Tyne river. Attracted by Gateshead's rich coalfields Newcastle made numerous attempts between the 13th and the 16th centuries to rule Gateshead as well. They succeeded briefly in 1553 when an Act of Annexation was passed handing control of the town to Newcastle. This lasted merely two years yet they retained an interest in Saltmeadows as it had been leased to them by in 1555 by a bishop for a period of 450 years. This issue was to create much bitterness between Gateshead and Newcastle. Up until the 19th century the leaders of Newcastle rented increasing acres of Saltmeadows reaping the financial rewards, as the 19th century was an era of its greatest industrial value. Just before the Second World War the Newcastle Corporation sold most of Saltmeadows back to Gateshead. What the leaders of Gateshead received, however, was largely derelict land with Newcastle overseeing around 17 acres of profitable terrain. It needed required heavy investment and effort by Gateshead to make Saltmeadows viable again.
 

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A history of the Tyne Tees Television LOGO, showing some of its many incarnations since the station started in the 1950s, up to almost the present day . . .


LOGOS Courtesy of this Website - http://www.transdiffusion.org/tmc/cityroad/history/
Great to see a link to one of my favourite sites - I believe much of this material was originally put online by meldrum.co.uk, associated with transdiffusion, back in the very early Noughties. I remember when their site didn't even work properly :p.


Another site worthy of mention in this thread is Newcastle's own sidetv.net, not to do with TV idents, but rather a monthly-changing 8-channel station webcasting documentaries by Amber Films and affiliates. Many of you will be aware of it - it is mentioned here to introduce those that aren't to this awesome site devoted to films of North East history. :)
 

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Another site worthy of mention in this thread is Newcastle's own sidetv.net, not to do with TV idents, but rather a monthly-changing 8-channel station webcasting documentaries by Amber Films and affiliates. Many of you will be aware of it - it is mentioned here to introduce those that aren't to this awesome site devoted to films of North East history. :)

An excellent site, indeed.

For those of you who have not yet checked it out, it is included along with a LOT of other "Local Interest" Websites, on our WEBSITES Listing Thread, which is one of the Sticky threads, at the top of the Forum.

It is included in 'Category 09' of that thread, here . . .

09 - PHOTOS: Local Photos, Local History & Local Interest Websites
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=59482683&postcount=10


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Did Gateshead ever develop business on the quayside or was it always on the Newcastle side? and how much can the leasing of Saltmeadows prevent the growth of the town of Gateshead or was it hamper by the Bishop of Durham?
 

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Did Gateshead ever develop business on the quayside or was it always on the Newcastle side? and how much can the leasing of Saltmeadows prevent the growth of the town of Gateshead or was it hamper by the Bishop of Durham?
The Gateshead Quayside was also heavily populated and commercialised/industrialised, especially at Pipewellgate - take a read through http://www.localhistorygateshead.com/gatesheads-history/gateshead-places/pipewellgate

Also worth a read to understand some of the industry an hisotry of Saltmeadows take a look at http://www.localhistorygateshead.com/gatesheads-history/gateshead-places/saltmeadows
 

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I think much of the hampering wasn't by the Bishop but by the Corporation of Newcastle, which made strenuous efforts to preserve its monopoly of the most lucrative Tyne trade: the shipping of coal. It was only in 1850 with the formation of the Tyne Improvement Commission that Newcastle's hold was broken.
 

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So the building of the Dunston staithes is a big deal as it's takes the Durham coal, where did the coal from this side of the water leave? Blyth?
 

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Initially carried by Newcastle keels to ships at the Quayside or downriver; later from staithes and coal drops on the north bank (which up to 1850 required approval from the Corporation even if they weren't in Newcastle) at places like Northumberland Dock (1857), Whitehill Point and Albert Edward Dock (1884).
 

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Well, it was pretty radical for Tyneside but it's fair to say the Tyne was lagging way, way behind other rivers/ports in terms of effective governance - for example the River Wear Commissioners had been established in the 18th century to improve the Wear. But when the TIC was founded in 1850 it represented all the Tyneside communities as well as the Admiralty, rather than just Newcastle Corporation, and it was far readier than Newcastle to invest money in improving the river. It brought it an engineer called John Ure, who had been responsible for straightening and deepening the River Clyde - and he effectively turned the Tyne into a massive ship canal. Under his plan (and over a period od decade) the river was dredged and embanked. Shallows and sands were removed; protruding 'points' of land sticking into the river were dynamited and removed. Kings Meadows island was dredged away. The 18th century Tyne Bridge was demolished (replaced by the Swing Bridge). A new cut of the river was made to by-pass what is now Lemington Gut; and the river broadened and straightened opposite Blaydon.

The 'by pass' or new course of river by Lemington was known as 'Cowen's Cut', after Joseph Cowen snr - father of Cowen the radical MP/Cowen's Monument/Tyne Theatre etc fame, - who (Joseph snr) was chairman of the TIC for many years.
 

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Initially carried by Newcastle keels to ships at the Quayside or downriver; later from staithes and coal drops on the north bank (which up to 1850 required approval from the Corporation even if they weren't in Newcastle) at places like Northumberland Dock (1857), Whitehill Point and Albert Edward Dock (1884).
There was also a set of staithes to the West of the Ouseburn which was linked to the Spittal Tongues Colliery via the Victoria Tunnel.

Using the Spital Tongues Colliery (STC) as an example - the vast majority of coal produced by the pit was sold to London, as was a lot of the coal of Northumberland and Durham. The Tyne made it possible to transport the coal to London and this is why so many staithes could be found on both sides of the river.

This is the staithes for the STC taken from the 1860 1st Edition OS Map :



Strategically the closest point that the STC could have reached the Tyne with its coal was Elswick but the problem with that was that Collier Brigs could not pass under the arches of the Tyne Bridge. Thus Keelmen had to be paid to transport the coal from the West of the Tyne Bridge down to waiting Colliers lower down in the river. This added to the cost of transporting the coal and therefore the STC originally moved its coal on horses and carts passing through Newcastle Town and onto Keels as the Quayside.

This is a drawing from the Newcastle Libraries Archive Collection which shows the old Tyne Bridge and Keels passing underneath it. Drawing courtesy of http://www.flickr.com/photos/newcastlelibraries/4077574596/sizes/o/in/photostream/



Owing to complaints from the Town Council and residents the STC were forced to find an alternative route for their coal delivery and this is why the Victoria Tunnel was built - coal could then be transported by rail down to the river, onto Keels and then taken down river to the waiting Colliers.

One of the problems at the time was the fact that the river was not being dredged and therefore in the higher reaches was too shallow for Colliers and thus the need for Keels. This was of course overcome by the creation of the Tyne Improvement Commission in 1854.

This is an example of a coal chute which was probably located in the Wallsend area, here coal could be loaded directly into the Collier without any requirement for the Keels - again courtesy of the City Libraries Archive Collection @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/newcastlelibraries/4077627664/sizes/o/in/photostream/



In the River Tyne Official Handbook of 1925 the Tyne Improvement Commission operated coal staithes at:

Whitehill Point - 5 individual staithes
Albert Edward Dock - 2 staithes
Northumberland Dock - 8 staithes (4 owned by the TIC and 4 privately by colleries)
Tyne Dock Staiths (owned by the London and North Eastern Railway Co but operated by the TIC) - 4 staithes
Dunston Staithes (owned by LNER and operated by TIC) - 6 loading berths
West Dunston Staithes (owned by LNER and operated by TIC) - 3 loading berths.

Private staithes on the Tyne in 1925 were:

Harton Staithes - South Shields
Springwell Staithes - Jarrow
Hebburn Colliery Staith - Hebburn
Wallsend Colliery Staith - Wallsend
Seaton Burn Staith - Wallsend
Pelaw Main Staith - Pelaw
Dean Primrose Staiths - Heworth
Felling Staiths - Felling
Low Elswick Staith - Elswick
Elswick Staith - Elswick
Derwenthaugh Staiths - Derwenthaugh
Montague Staithes - Scotswood
Walbotle Staith - Lemington
Throckley Staith - Lemington
Priestman Staith - Blaydon
Stella Staiths - Stella

A couple of scans from the Second Edition 1897 OS map showing Northumberland Dock, Whitehill Point and Albert Edward Dock detailing the extensive railway lines and staiths.



 

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I am loving the 1897 map of Northumberland dock the railways come direct from the coal fields and a custom house as well! Any of this remaining?
I may try and trick the husband to take me out on an excursion but he loathes these jaunts.
 
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