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Newcastle University students uncover the stories behind the names on a World War One plaque

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/north-east-news/newcastle-university-students-uncover-stories-8051668
Newcastle University students uncover the stories behind the names on a World War One plaque
Nov 05, 2014 09:24 By Ian Robson


From left: Scott Bradley, Ian Johnson and Ben Howson

University students have discovered the dramatic stories behind the names of the dead on a World War I memorial plaque.

Researchers have revealed the heroism and heartache behind some of the 223 names on the inscription inside the Armstrong Building at Newcastle University.

The project started as a student’s dissertation before being expanded by head of archaeology Dr Jane Webster as part of the Armstrong Building Digital Memory Book. She said: “Most people don’t even look at the plaque when they walk past it. It’s just become part of the furniture. This seemed a real shame to me and that’s where the idea for the digital memory book came from.”

Students Ben Howson and Holly Johnson helped to research around 200 names using the University archives and online sources such as the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website. “It felt like an honour really,” said Ben. “The way we were able to learn about the staff and students who came before us and made that sacrifice. Armstrong College was quite small at the time so for 223 men to die in the war would have had a huge impact.”

The story which stands out for Ben is that of Wallace Moir Annand, who studied maths, physics, chemistry and engineering. He died on 4 June 1915, aged 27, while serving in the Navy at Gallipoli.

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/north-east-news/newcastle-university-students-uncover-stories-8051668

The Project's web site is @ http://memorial.ncl.ac.uk/
 

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The Cattle Market and Marlborough Crescent Bus Station in 1963

An interesting photograph uploaded by Tyne & Wear Archives to their Flickr Photostream showing The Cattle Market and Marlborough Crescent Bus Station in 1963:

Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums
Cattle Market to Central Station, Newcastle upon Tyne, 1963

Aerial view of the area between the Cattle Market and Newcastle Central Station, July 1963 (TWAM ref. DT.TUR/2/31899A).
This area has changed significantly since this photograph was taken. Marlborough Crescent Bus Station, the Station Car Park and the Cattle Market have disappeared. New additions include the Centre for Life.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/twm_news/15103815023/sizes/l
 

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What's that hexagonal looking building? In fact what is that entire bottom quarter?
It's the old cattle market (the area), which latterly became a car park after the new Redheugh bridge and conmnecting road took awy the eastern 1/2 (ish) of it. It is now the home of Jurys Hotel, The Bar Apartments and a couple of office blocks.
 

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Discussion Starter #5,006
It's the old Cattle Market area, which latterly became a car park after the new Redheugh bridge and connecting road took away the eastern 1/2 (ish) of it. It is now the home of Jurys Hotel, The Bar Apartments and a couple of office blocks.

Quite a lot about the 'Cattle Market Area', with more good photos, on the forum now . . .

CATTLE MARKET, NEAR CENTRAL STATION . . .
The Cattle Market as it looked many years ago (in an old postcard)
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=53154073&postcount=831
The Cattle Market as it looked many years ago (in a series of photos obtained from 'Facebook')
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=100139216&postcount=3504
Old Map of the Cattle Market area, showing the nearby Slaughterhouses
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=83900790&postcount=1646
Cattle Market - A photo from the 1930s book "Souvenir of a Visit to Newcastle" showing the 'Market Keepers House' in the background
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=100155961&postcount=3506
Cattle Market - 1950s Plans for Hotel / Multi Storey Car Park / Helicopter Terminal / Bus Station (Newcastle as it might have been)
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=56010227&postcount=324
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=56151203&postcount=328
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=56215499&postcount=329
Cattle Market area from the air - Mid 20th Century
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=53166211&postcount=833
Cattle Market area from the air - Taken in 1963
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=118886432&postcount=5002
The Cattle Market "Market Keepers House" - Today (without being moved) it is part of 'Times Square', Centre for Life
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=85077364&postcount=2562
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=85078091&postcount=2563
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=85078850&postcount=2564
Market Keepers House Clock Tower photo (and other photos) taken May 2013
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=103974006&postcount=2664
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=103979130&postcount=2666

Also, about 'Marlborough Crescent Bus Station' . . .

.
 

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On This Day In History - 9th November 1828

John Sykes passes on this piece of historical note in his Local Records for this day in history, 9th November 1828.

A fire occurred in All Saints' church, Newcastle.

When the congregation assembled at three o'clock for divine service, there was a great deal of smoke in the church, and it increased so much during the sermon that many of the congregation were obliged to leave the sacred edifice, and, therefore, the minister (the Rev. W. A. Shute) who was preaching, thought it best to conclude abruptly.

The church being warmed by a stove, it was found that the upright flue or chimney had been filled with soot, and this having ignited, had heated the iron flue red hot, and as this passed near one of the main timbers of the roof; and separated from it only by lime, the beam had caught fire, and the flames had communicated to some of the rafters which it supported.

Fire engines being immediately sent for, the devouring element was apparently overcome about a quarter-past six o'clock. It, however, partially broke out again about half-past ten; but as the precaution had been taken to leave one engine and the firemen upon the spot, it was immediately discovered, and finally extinguished about eleven o'clock at night. It was supposed that in half an hour more the conflagration would have become general, and reduced this elegant structure to a heap of ruins.

So great was the public anxiety for the preservation of the church, that the corpse of Mr. Lax, which was in waiting at four o'clock, could not be interred until between six and seven o'clock.

The damage amounted to about £260.


Image hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.com/All Saints Church

This story reminds me of the many chimney fires that seemed to happen back in the 1960's - folk not having their chimneys swept and the soot catching fire - spectacular displays with smoke and sparks coming out of the chimneys.
 

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On This Day In History - 11th November 1844

Thomas Fordyce writing a report from this day in history, 11th November 1844.

General Tom Thumb, a dwarf, was exhibited in the Music Hall, Newcastle, on this and the four following days, and there, as elsewhere, drew immense crowds of spectators.

The child, who was 25 inches in height and weighed only about 15 lb, was drawn about the streets in a very handsome chariot of most diminutive dimensions.

He was represented to be in his thirteenth year, by his exhibitor, Mr. Barnum, one of the most accomplished social humbugs existing at that time, although, in reality, he was only in his fifth year, which Mr. Barnum unblushingly acknowledged, afterwards, when lecturing in Newcastle on "Humbug."

This is an image of Tom Thumb (January 4, 1838 – July 15, 1883) courtesy of the Montana's New Country Leader @ http://kyssfm.com/today-is-tom-thumb-day/



This is the Music Hall in Nelson Street:


Image hosted on www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
 

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On This Day In History - 15th November 1873

Thomas Fordyce writes about this event in Newcastle in his Local Records for this day in history, 15th November 1873.

Two American revivalists—Messrs. Moody and Sankey—who, after visiting the North of England, created quite a religious panic in various parts of the country, took a farewell of their friends at a meeting in Brunswick Place Chapel, Newcastle-on-Tyne.

The spacious place of worship was crowded to the doors by an earnest and devout congregation, it being estimated that not less than 3,000 persons were present. It was, indeed, one of the largest religious meetings ever held in the town, and was singularly representative in character. Merchants from the Quayside, wealthy coal-owners and large manufacturers, aldermen and town councillors, magistrates belonging to Newcastle and neighbouring boroughs, tradesmen (though the Saturday is the busiest day of the week), artisans, seafaring people, pitmen and their families, and members of county families, were in the congregation.

The platform was crowded with ministers of all denominations, and also members of the Society of Friends. Mr. Moody presided, and Mr. Sankey conducted the singing.

At the close of the service, a meeting was held for the purpose of taking steps to build a Religious Institute in Newcastle. In connection with this movement, Mr. Moody said he had been impressed by the idea that there was a great need for such a structure, on a model similar to that of the Mildmay Park Conference Hall in London. The object of the building would be to form a Christian union, where Methodists, Baptists, Presbyterians, and members of other denominations could meet on one platform. It was the tabernacle that kept the tribes together, and why could not a tabernacle or Temple be built in Newcastle, in order that the different denominations might keep themselves banded together in one great Christian union, in a place where they might meet, and by their united efforts keep back the dark waves of death and of hell?

When he first entered the town he was struck with astonishment that such a town should allow the Young Men's Christian Association to meet in a small, dirty room. Now, it would be best to erect such a building as he had named, and have the Young Men's Christian Association, Bible Society, and Sunday School Union on the same premises. He had faith to believe that there was a sufficient number of religious gentlemen in the town who would voluntarily give £1,000 each towards this object. He then strongly urged the need of such an institution, and after doing so said he would appoint a committee in order to raise the amount required.

Moody and Sankey
This from Wikipedia @ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moody_and_Sankey

Moody and Sankey was the evangelical duo of Ira David Sankey and Dwight Lyman Moody. Starting after their meeting in June 1871, the team wrote Christian songs and traveled throughout the United States and the United Kingdom calling people to God through their use of song, with Moody preaching and Sankey singing. Together they published books of Christian hymns.

Moody had started in Christian ministry as a Sunday School teacher in Chicago. His application to teach Sunday School in his church was rebuffed, but undeterred he rounded up children from the city streets and soon had a Sunday School several hundred strong. Later, Moody was to be challenged by the event of the Great Chicago Fire. The Sunday before he had preached a moving sermon on human sinfulness. He concluded his sermon by announcing that the following Sunday he would explain how sins could be forgiven. Many of his congregation never returned, having perished in the fire.

From that moment Moody vowed never to close a meeting without giving the congregation an opportunity to respond to his gospel message. The format of the meetings with Sankey acting as song leader and singing while accompanying himself on an American Organ became a template for many evangelists in the 20th Century including Dr. Billy Graham. Sankey's rousing hymns and solos softened hearts before Moody preached.

They came to the United Kingdom in 1875, first in Scotland, and attracted large crowds.

Young Men's Christian Association - Blackett Street


The YMCA was first housed within the former premises of St James Chapel on the corner of Blackett Street and Grainger Street, more or less where the Monument entrance to Intu Eldon Square stands today. The original chapel was designed by John Dobson and opened in 1826. However that building was demolished in 1859 to be replaced by this building - image courtesy of the Newcastle City Libraries Archive Collection on Flickr:

Newcastle Libraries
055245:Blackett Street Newcastle upon Tyne P.M. Laws undated

Description : View of Blackett Street Newcastle upon Tyne by P.M. Laws



The above building had been purchased by the YMCA in 1884 but they soon realised that larger premises were required. This led to the demolition of the former chapel and foundations for a new building on the site having its foundation stones laid in 1896 by the Countess of Ravensworth, Sir Richard Webster, Mr Cruddas and Mr Emmerson Bainbridge MP.

The new building was opened in 1900 by Queen Victoria's son Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn and his wife Louise, the cost of the build having been £50,000. The building including Connaught Hall which had two halls to seat 700 and 300 people, a reception room, reading room and library. The ground floor was leased to shopkeepers.

This is a photograph of the YMCA - courtesy of the Newcastle City Libraries.

Newcastle Libraries
070766:Blackett Street Newcastle upon Tyne Unknown 1905

Type : Photograph Description : An undated view of Blackett Street Newcastle upon Tyne. The view is looking towards the YMCA building at the junction of Grainger Street and Blackett Street. In the foreground to the left is a range of buildings which includes 'Northern Goldsmiths'. Grey's Monument and the YMCA building are in the background. Horse-drawn vehicles are travelling along Blackett Street and Pilgrim Street.



The YMCA was demolished in the 1970's to make way for the Eldon Square Shopping Centre but some of its carved reliefs were relocated to Prudhoe Chare:




Images hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.com/Prudhoe Chare
 

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On This Day In History - 18th November 1812

This is a strange one from John Sykes in his Local Records for this day in history, 18th November 1812.

Some workmen employed in a quarry at Byker-hill, near Newcastle, on splitting a huge block of freestone, nearly three tons weight, found a living toad in the middle of it. The cavity that contained the animal, to which there was no passage, was the model of its figure, and was lined with a black substance suffused with moisture.
 

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On This Day In History - 20th November 1844

From Thomas Fordyce's Local Records for this day in history, 20th November 1844.

As Mr. Hernaman, proprietor of the "Newcastle Journal," was proceeding from his residence in Lovaine Row towards his office in Grey Street, he was accosted, near the Barras Bridge, by Mr. Addison Potter, jun. (eldest son of the then Mayor of Newcastle), who produced a copy of the journal of the previous week, and demanded the name of the author of a grossly offensive paragraph, which unjustly reflected on some part of Mr. Potter's family.

Mr. Hernaman replied that this was not the place to answer such a question. Mr. Potter then introduced himself by name, and repeated his demand for the author to be given up to him instantly.

Mr. Hernaman having again refused to comply with the request, Mr. Potter immediately began to apply a whip to the shoulders and legs of the former, whose cries attracted to the spot two or three gentlemen who were passing near, one of whom, in interfering, received an inadvertent cut or two.

Mr. Potter apologized to the gentleman for the accident, at the same time observing to Mr. Hernaman that in case he should hereafter publish any insinuations respecting his (Mr. Potter's) family, he would punish him again in a similar manner.

It is, however, proper to add that the authorship of the paragraph in question was generally supposed not to be with Mr. Hernaman.

John Hernaman
gets a mention in the Monthly Chronicle of North Country Lore and Legend (January 1889 edition) within an article on the Streets of Newcastle - Grey Street:

At the corner of the little lane just a step or so further down Grey Street, the Newcastle Journal had its printing and publishing offices at one time.

Mr. John Hernaman was the editor of this paper for some years, and got into several scrapes owing to the violence with which he attacked his political opponents.

On one occasion he fell foul of Mr. Larkin, who, in return, made mincemeat of him (metaphorically) in a scathing pamphlet, entitled, "A Letter to Fustigated John"—the word "fustigated" being an old synonym for "whipped." It was, in fact, Mr. Hernaman's unpleasant experience to have to endure corporal chastisement more than once in the course of his journalistic career.

One of his whippings occurred at the Barras Bridge. In another case, several Sunderland men came over to Newcastle to avenge themselves for what they considered an unfair criticism on certain of their transactions. They suddenly burst in upon the editorial presence, and asked Hernaman for the name of the writer of the objectionable article. The latter declined to furnish them with any information on the subject. On this refusal, he was attacked with walking-sticks and horsewhips.

The case came up in due time at the Sessions, where the defendants were "strongly recommended to mercy on account of the very great provocation hey had received." They were each called upon to pay a fine of £50.

Fortunately, the days of such journalistic amenities in Newcastle may be safely enough regarded as over now for good.
 

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On this Day In History - 24th November 1786 - Black Bull Link

"About ten o'clock at night, some company went into Mr. Pinkney's, a publican, in the Bigg-market, Newcastle, when words arose between them and Ewan Macdonald, a recruit in general Guise's regiment, quartered in that town, from words they came to blows, which caused some of the company to leave the room, but Macdonald followed them out, laid hold on one Mr. Robert Parker, a cooper, in the entry of the above house, and wickedly stabbed him with a knife in the neck, in so desperate a manner that he died immediately."
Local records; or, Historical register of remarkable events, May 23rd 1752, Volume 1, John Sykes.

This entry from Sykes is an almost verbatim copy of a newspaper report from the Newcastle Courant, and represents the sum total of the known facts about the murder. A second report appeared in the newspaper in September detailing his execution - how he tried to throw the hangman off the gallows - and his subsequent revival on the dissection table. This story also mentions the murder having taken place at "Mr Pinkney's in the Bigg Market". Both the Courant stories form the basis of a lengthy and considerably embellished article in the Monthly Chronicles, published over a century later, which doesn't shed any more light on where the crime was committed.

Pinkney is an unusual name, and therefore relatively easy to find and track through the records and newspapers. Unfortunately it was a large family, at least three of whom shared the name 'Robert'. So there are several candidates for the mysterious Mr Pinkney, not to mention possible locations for his "public house".

The first Robert Pinkney kept the Blue Bell public house in Gateshead, and appears regularly in newspaper reports from 1733 to 1766 at that address. Another Pinkney, Christopher, had the Rose Tavern on the Quayside in 1711, and a Mrs Pinkney was landlady of the Sign of the Angel, said in an advertisement from 1732 to be in the "Oat Market". Other well-known inns such as the Half Moon and the Turk's Head are also described as being in the Oat Market, so from this we can deduce that it was another term for what would now be called the Bigg Market.

The Angel was one of Newcastle's principle coaching inns at the beginning of the eighteenth century. According to an article in Archaeologia Aeliana, the other important coaching inns in the neighbourhood at that time included the Black Horse by the White Cross in Newgate Street; the White Hart and Bull in the Flesh Market; the Bull and Crown in the Flesh Market; and Black Bull. This last inn gave its address variously as Oat Market and the Bigg Market, but like the Angel, the Black Bull was actually in High Bridge.

The Black Bull was where judges were wined and dined before performing their duties at the Assizes for the County of Northumberland. A manuscript circular dated 1709 was sent out by the High Sheriff of Northumberland, William Carr of Eshott, requesting their company for a glass of wine at "the house of Mr Elrington", who kept the Black Bull at the time.


The Black Bull is a few yards behind the three men in the picture, along High Bridge. Its access from the Bigg Market was by the entrance to Black Bull Yard, on the far left. The picture is from an unknown source.


In an advertisement from The Journal in 1845, the Black Bull gives its address as both High Bridge and the Bigg Market.

It was directly opposite the Angel, and in 1745 it was in the possession of Elizabeth Pinkney, most likely the same Mrs Pinkney. Advertisements often appeared in local newspapers from innkeepers who moved to "more commodious accommodation" a few doors away from their current premises, the same handful of names upgrading or downgrading according to their fancy or fortune. One of the most prominent of these names in the Bigg Market area in the eighteenth century was Pinkney.

So it's no surprise to see a Mrs Pinkney mentioned as landlady of another nearby coaching inn a few years later, the Old George, in 1770. This is probably the same Elizabeth Pinkney, who according to the Newcastle Courant, died in 1777. She is named as the wife of Robert Pinkney of the Groat Market. This new Robert Pinkney's profession is given as a grocer, and this description continues for the next few years. Nowhere is he described as a "publican".

However, he had a lot of property in the area, so it's possible he owned at various times the three inns that were run by his wife. The Angel was offered to let in 1732 and the Black Bull in 1745, and the name Pinkney doesn't appear in relation to either after these dates. He didn't own the Black Bull in May 1752, the month of the murder, when an advertisement for a dinner at the Infirmary for the Sick and Lames Poor tells us it belonged to Ralph Steel, and a later one says it was bought from him by John Nelson in 1769.

It's difficult to pin down when the Pinkneys moved to the Old George, which is also frustrating, as the Old George's history is otherwise unusually well documented. But this is crucial in establishing where the "Mr Pinkney's" was, in which the murder occurred. Although I can't put a Pinkney in the Old George at the date of the murder in 1752, there is a link between the inn and the family at that time.

A man by the name of Achurch was an actor who specialised in Shakespearean roles, and staged several plays at the "Bigg Market Theatre", which was in Mr Parker's Yard at the Turk's Head, at the head of the Bigg Market. Achurch was lodging at the Old George in 1749. Advertisements for these events say that tickets were available from the Old George and a handful of inns around the Bigg Market, as well as "Mr Pinkney's, Blue Bell, Gateshead". This may suggest a relationship between these two inns, but it is undermined by another advert in 1750 for a “Concert of Musick” at the Turk’s Head, for which tickets were available at “Mr Haines’s, the George, in the Flesh Market”.

If the Pinkneys were in the Old George at the time of the murder, they’d have to have moved there after 1750. They were long gone from the Sign of the Angel by then, and had left the Black Bull, which was owned by Ralph Steel at the time of the murder. But their name doesn’t occur in relation to any other inn between 1745 and 1770, so I’m inclined to believe once again that the Old George is the leading contender for the location of the murder.

A third Robert Pinkney, who had a silversmith’s shop a few doors from the Old George, removed to the Head of the Side a few years later. A lot of his work survives, and fetches thousands of pounds when it comes up for auction.
While looking to see what happened on this day in history I happened upon this report from John Sykes which mentions the previous manager of the Black Bull, Flesh Market - so I thought it useful to link to this posting:

24th November 1786

A most shocking circumstance happened at Benwell, near Newcastle. Mr. Sparke, whose mother formerly kept the Black Bull ale-house, in the Flesh Market, Newcastle, having spent a considerable part of the evening with his mother in her apartment up stairs, and having, it was supposed, got himself rather intoxicated, came down, and told the maid-servant he would kill the cat, when he instantly caught hold of the animal and dashed out its brains; after which he forcibly turned the girl to the door, and locked it after her.

She went to a neighbouring house to stay till the morning, when she returned and found the door open, and was met by her master, who informed her he had been fighting with the devil all night, and had killed him, and he was then lying dead up stairs, dressed in his mother's clothes.

The girl did not much regard what he said, as she had discovered, several times previous thereto, strong marks of insanity; but thinking her mistress unusually long in coming down stairs, she went up to awake her, when, on entering the room, a most dreadful spectacle presented itself; Mrs. Sparke lying dead, wounded in many places, and the bed-clothes, all bloody, strewed about the room.

Upon examination, her neck being black and swelled, corroborated with other circumstances, the jury gave in their verdict, wilful murder by her own son, on which he was committed to Morpeth gaol. Previous to this act, he had been intoxicated for some days, which never failed to produce delirium, which often occasioned him to commit acts that testified the most perfect insanity.

At the assizes, held in Newcastle, in August, 1787, he was acquitted.
 

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Hidden Newcastle phone app brings 800 years of city's history to life

Courtesy of the Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/north-east-analysis/analysis-news/phone-app-reveals-hidden-newcastle-8171282
Hidden Newcastle phone app brings 800 years of city's history to life
Nov 25, 2014 19:00 By Tony Henderson


Westgate Road

A happy ending was not in prospect the day the three bears visited Newcastle and caused panic across the city centre.

The incident 60 years ago happened when the bears, due to appear in a show at the city’s Palace Theatre, escaped from a temporary cage in which they were being exhibited in Eldon Square. The ensuing hour which saw shoppers fleeing and several people injured is one of 75 tales and bizarre happenings from the last 800 years of Newcastle’s history.

Now they are available as a free Hidden Newcastle mobile phone app for use on a walking tour of the city. The app is a much expanded and revamped version of an initial venture trialled two years ago. The number of stories has been increased by 50, with new features which include an alert when the walk nears locations connected to the tales. A map allows users to see stories in text, images and video and uses information from documents, photographs and newspaper cuttings from Tyne & Wear Archives and Newcastle City Libraries. The map allows people to match stories to locations, and listen to them while standing in the spot where they took place. The new app comes from Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums (TWAM) and NE1 Ltd, the business improvement district company for the city centre.

In the case of the three bears, they ran off separately to the Haymarket, Percy Street and Morden Street, injuring several people in their path who included shoppers, a car park attendant, an Evening Chronicle photographer and a policeman. The bears – standing 6ft on their hind legs – were on the loose for an hour before being recaptured, tethered and muzzled. One had ripped the bumper from a car, bit a woman on the back of the neck, and knocked down a police inspector when he tried to placate it with sugar lumps. The bears’ trainer, Norwegian Hans Peterson, said they would be performing that night as usual in the theatre.

Hidden Newcastle is a free app available for iOS and Android. It can be downloaded for free at www.hiddennewcastle.org

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/north-east-analysis/analysis-news/phone-app-reveals-hidden-newcastle-8171282
 

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On This Day In History - 28th November 1861

This piece from Thomas Fordyce from his Local Records of this day in history, 28th November 1861 demonstrates that mugging is not a new "invention". From what I understand the victim wasn't killed, simply garrotted until they became semi-conscious owing to oxygen deprivation:

One of the most audacious garotte robberies was perpetrated this evening about six o'clock.

It appeared that Mr. Robert Turnbull, a commercial traveller, who represents the firm of Messrs. Church and Son, fruit merchants, London, and whose residence was in Summerhill Terrace, Newcastle, was proceeding homeward, and on turning in towards the back of Westmoreland Terrace he was met by two men, who immediately seized him, and succeeded in rifling Mr. Turnbull's pocket, from which they abstracted a pocket-book and a purse, the latter containing about £70 in gold and £30 in notes, together with a cheque for £8.

The robbery was only the work of a few moments, and, when effected, the perpetrators of the daring deed immediately made off.
 

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On This Day In History - 30th November 1969

Today is the 45th anniversary of the Callers fire on Northumberland Street - something which was instrumental in so many changes to the City Centre.

There was a piece in the Chronicle on 28th November 2014 by Dave Morton which is scanned below:



Copyright NCJMedia Ltd - hosted on www.steve-ellwood.org.uk

The forum is of course a mine of information on Callers which can be seen in the Forum Index @ http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1159925

CALLERS OF NORTHUMBERLAND STREET (FURNITURE, GIFTS, ELECTRICALS, RECORDS, & 'CALLERS PEGASUS') . . .
The full story of the 1969 Callers Fire, with photos from then to the present day
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=44745826&postcount=1
Memories of the time of the fire, by a director of 'McConnells' (who handled the advertising for the Callers Group)
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=82325148&postcount=2363
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=82387657&postcount=2364
More Memories of the fire - this time from a "4 year old" at the time
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=82619603&postcount=2394
Subsequent Occupants of the "re-built" Callers Building, from 1971 to date
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=73975533&postcount=206
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=99207774&postcount=5971
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=116296655&postcount=1751
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=116322840&postcount=1753
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=116459931&postcount=8173
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=118867683&postcount=8378
A "Remember When" article about Callers, in the Newcastle Evening Chronicle, in 2012
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=90908589&postcount=663
Two recently discovered "Torday Collection" PHOTOS (from the early 1970s) of the new Callers, rebuilt after the 1969 fire
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=102719698&postcount=3732
Christmas Displays - In the 'front-arcade' of the original (pre-1969 fire) Callers Store
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpost.php?p=119030273&postcount=259
 

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On This Day In History - 1st December 1239

John Sykes records this historical note in this Local Records for this day in history, 1st December 1239.

King Henry III. granted a charter to Newcastle, to dig coals and stones in the common soil of that town, without the walls thereof, in a place called the Castle Field, and the Forth.

Here, it is supposed, the first coals about Newcastle were wrought.

In 1280, the coal trade had increased so much as to double the worth of the town of Newcastle, and in the latter end of Queen Elizabeth's reign, a duty of fourpence per chaldron upon coals produced £10,000 a-year.

After the great fire in London, in 1666, duties were laid upon this article to assist in rebuilding St. Paul's and fifty parish churches in that city.

In the year 1677, Charles I. granted to his natural son, Charles Lennox, Duke of Richmond and his heirs, a duty of one shilling a chaldron on coals, which continued in the family till it was purchased by government in 1800, for the annual payment of £19,000.
 

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Talking of Dog Leap Stairs, I was at the Local History Fair at St Mary's Gateshead today and was talking to a guy who mentioned there had also been a Dog Leap Stairs in South Shields. I had heard of Penny Pie Stairs at Holborn, South Shields but not before today Dog Leap Stairs.

If anyone's got any further information it would be appreciated.
I came across this while looking for something else, it might give you a better idea of where the Dog Leap Stairs was in South Shields:


Shields Daily Gazette, December 3rd, 1884

My favourite South Shields street name is Comical Corner, which was near the Halfpenny Ferry Landing. I believe there's still a sign on a wall for it, and it wasn't far from Dog Leap Stairs.
 

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The Hancock Museum in Newcastle during World War II

Courtesy of the Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/history/hancock-museum-newcastle-during-world-8203508
The Hancock Museum in Newcastle during World War II
Dec 01, 2014 19:00 By David Morton

The Trustees of the Natural History Society of Northumberland, Durham and Newcastle upon Tyne, held an emergency Council meeting to discuss the protection of their museum and the valuable collections. T Russell Goddard, the Museum Curator, was given the immense task of saving the museum and its contents from the threat of the imminent conflict. Various items were removed from display and carefully placed in strong wooden packing cases to be stored in a variety of ‘safe’ locations. Among the many items dispatched were the collection of drawings and watercolours by Thomas Bewick, Albany Hancock‘s drawings of Nudibranchs (Sea Slugs), the Atthey and Hutton collection of Coal Measure fossils and the irreplaceable specimens of the Great Auk. The Society’s minute books and a complete set of its transactions as well as other valuable documents were also packed ready for removal.

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/history/hancock-museum-newcastle-during-world-8203508
 

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On This Day In History - 5th December 2013

Courtesy of the Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/north-east-news/one-year-on-30-dramatic-8226180
One year on: 30 dramatic pictures of Newcastle Quayside flooded after tidal surge
Dec 05, 2014 07:00 By Sarah Jeffery



It's 12 months since the Quayside in Newcastle was suddenly flooded following a tidal surge caused by stormy weather.

On the afternoon of December 5 2013, the Quayside was closed from the Law Courts to the Side due to flooding after the River Tyne burst its banks and reached its highest water level for three decades.

Following a tidal surge along the North East coastline at high tide between 4pm and 5pm, the Tyne flooded at several locations. Pubs and businesses were suddenly flooded as the waters of the Tyne rose and inches-deep water poured over the roads and pavements.

A 400-metre between the Tyne Bridge and the Millennium Bridge was flooded almost instantly, and traffic came to a standstill as police were forced to close the roads. Elsewhere in the region, the tidal surge caused problems in coastal areas with both piers submerged at Cullercoats in North Tyneside.

The Environment Agency said the tidal surge was the biggest seen on the east coast for 30 years. Tidal levels peaked at South Shields before beginning to drop slowly.

See image gallery and video's @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/north-east-news/one-year-on-30-dramatic-8226180
 
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